Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • Western author Johnny D. Boggs examines the cinematic heritage of Missouri outlaw Jesse James to separate fact from fiction and myth from reality.
    Johnny D. Boggs - Jesse James and the Movies
    Sunday, July 15, 2012
    Central Library

    Since his first celluloid depiction in 1908, Jesse James has been the subject of more than 40 films and has been portrayed by the likes of Tyrone Power, Audie Murphy, Robert Duvall, and Brad Pitt. Western author Johnny D. Boggs examines this cinematic heritage to separate fact from fiction and myth from reality.

    Boggs has written more than 40 novels about the Old West. He is a six-time winner of the prestigious Spur Award from Western Writers of America, and in 2004 received the Western Heritage Wrangler Award.

  • Biographer John Robert Greene examines the domestic issues, personality factors, and the vagaries of the 1992 campaign that confined George H.W. Bush to a single term.
    John Robert Greene - George H.W. Bush
    Thursday, July 12, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    How could a president have won a war and lost a re-election? For George H.W. Bush, being Commander-in-Chief during Desert Storm was not enough.

    John Robert Greene, author of The Presidency of George Bush, sets Bush’s presidency in the context of the Reagan years and reviews his foreign policy successes, such as the war with Iraq and an improved relationship with Russia, and nagging domestic issues such as economic recession, “Read My Lips,” and the Clarence Thomas Supreme Court appointment.

  • Be part of the studio audience as KCPT tapes the latest installment of Meet the Past when Crosby Kemper III interviews basketball inventor and former Kansas Jayhawks coach James Naismith, as portrayed by Bill Worley.
    Meet the Past - James Naismith
    Wednesday, July 11, 2012
    Central Library

    Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III returns for a conversation with James Naismith, portrayed by Bill Worley.

    In 1891 Canadian minister and physical education teacher James Naismith invented a game that could be played indoors. He called it “basket ball” after the peach baskets which served as goals. A few years later he founded the University of Kansas basketball program (he worked for KU until his retirement in 1937 at the age of 76).

  • Governor Jay Nixon - Kansas City Land Bank
    Monday, July 9, 2012
    Lucile H. Bluford Branch

    Gov. Jay Nixon today signed House Bill 1659 which allows Kansas City to create a land bank for the purpose of acquiring, rehabilitating, and reselling abandoned and blighted properties. The Governor went to the Lucile H. Bluford Branch Library in Kansas City to sign the bill.

  • Author and businessman Barnett C. Helzberg, Jr. and Library Director Crosby Kemper III hold a public conversation with some of the local entrepreneurs profiled in Helzberg's new book Entrepreneurs + Mentors = Success: 22 Convincing Stories.
    Barnett C. Helzberg Jr. - Entrepreneurs + Mentors = Success: 22 Convincing Stories
    Thursday, June 28, 2012
    Central Library

    No matter what the business problem, there’s usually someone who’s dealt with it before. That’s the power of mentoring, business veterans share their insights with up-and-coming entrepreneurs.

    Author and businessman Barnett C. Helzberg Jr. and Library Director Crosby Kemper III hold a public conversation with some of the local entrepreneurs profiled in Helzberg’s new book Entrepreneurs + Mentors = Success: 22 Convincing Stories.

  • Historian Jeff Broadwater discusses the presidency of James Madison who played key roles in the creation of the Constitution and Bill of Rights, but whose clear political mind became muddled when it came to slavery and race.
    Jeff Broadwater: James Madison
    Wednesday, June 27, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    Historian Jeff Broadwater argues that no single figure can tell us more about the origins of the American republic than our fourth president, James Madison, a bookish political theorist who played key roles in the creation of the Constitution and Bill of Rights, but whose thinking became muddled on the issue of race.

    Broadwater is professor of history at Barton College and author of James Madison: A Son of Virginia and a Founder of the Nation.

  • Ethno-biologist Edwin Marty looks at the exploding urban farming movement, which he believes has the potential to transform our national food system.
    Edwin Marty - Breaking Through Concrete: Building an Urban Farm Revival
    Tuesday, June 26, 2012
    Central Library

    Author Edwin Marty looks at successful urban farm programs, part of an environmental and social movement that could transform our national food system. From backyard food swaps to a restaurant supply garden on a Brooklyn rooftop, Marty chronicles changing attitudes and offers advice on keeping livestock in the city, decontaminating toxic soil, and even changing zoning laws.

    Marty is an ethno-botanist, former assistant garden editor for Southern Living magazine and founder of the Jones Valley Urban Farm in Birmingham, Alabama.

  • Author Brandon G. Kinney explores the complex series of events that led to Missouri’s brief but bloody Mormon War of 1838, a conflict over religion, ideology, and land.
    Brandon G. Kinney: The Mormon War of 1838
    Sunday, June 24, 2012
    Central Library

    Author Brandon G. Kinney explores the complex series of events that led to the brief but bloody Mormon War of 1838, a conflict over religion, ideology, and land pitting Joseph Smith and his Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints against other Missouri residents, the governor, and the state militia.

    Kinney is a graduate of the Creighton University School of Law and practices law in Butler, Missouri. He is the author of The Mormon War: Zion and the Missouri Extermination Order of 1838.

  • When her husband, President Woodrow Wilson, suffered a stroke in 1919, did Edith Wilson control the reins of power to become, in effect, our first woman president?
    Kristie Miller: Edith Bolling Wilson
    Thursday, June 21, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    Flamboyant, confident, and controversial, Edith Bolling Wilson was not your traditional First Lady. After her husband, Woodrow Wilson, suffered a debilitating stroke in 1919, she took the reins of government and acted on behalf of her ailing spouse. Historian Kristie Miller looks into the life of the woman known as “Madame Regent” and “the Assistant President” and asks: Was Edith Wilson, in effect, our first woman president?

  • Author Max Holland delves into the mystery of Mark Felt, the FBI official who as the legendary “Deep Throat” helped bring down the presidency of Richard Nixon.
    Max Holland - Leak: Why Mark Felt Became Deep Throat
    Monday, June 18, 2012
    Central Library

    Author Max Holland delves into the enigma that is Mark Felt (1913-2008), the FBI official who as the mysterious Deep Throat shared with reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein insider information on the Watergate scandal and by doing so helped to bring down President Richard Nixon.