Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • Author and businessman Barnett C. Helzberg, Jr. and Library Director Crosby Kemper III hold a public conversation with some of the local entrepreneurs profiled in Helzberg's new book Entrepreneurs + Mentors = Success: 22 Convincing Stories.
    Barnett C. Helzberg Jr. - Entrepreneurs + Mentors = Success: 22 Convincing Stories
    Thursday, June 28, 2012
    Central Library

    No matter what the business problem, there’s usually someone who’s dealt with it before. That’s the power of mentoring, business veterans share their insights with up-and-coming entrepreneurs.

    Author and businessman Barnett C. Helzberg Jr. and Library Director Crosby Kemper III hold a public conversation with some of the local entrepreneurs profiled in Helzberg’s new book Entrepreneurs + Mentors = Success: 22 Convincing Stories.

  • Historian Jeff Broadwater discusses the presidency of James Madison who played key roles in the creation of the Constitution and Bill of Rights, but whose clear political mind became muddled when it came to slavery and race.
    Jeff Broadwater: James Madison
    Wednesday, June 27, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    Historian Jeff Broadwater argues that no single figure can tell us more about the origins of the American republic than our fourth president, James Madison, a bookish political theorist who played key roles in the creation of the Constitution and Bill of Rights, but whose thinking became muddled on the issue of race.

    Broadwater is professor of history at Barton College and author of James Madison: A Son of Virginia and a Founder of the Nation.

  • Ethno-biologist Edwin Marty looks at the exploding urban farming movement, which he believes has the potential to transform our national food system.
    Edwin Marty - Breaking Through Concrete: Building an Urban Farm Revival
    Tuesday, June 26, 2012
    Central Library

    Author Edwin Marty looks at successful urban farm programs, part of an environmental and social movement that could transform our national food system. From backyard food swaps to a restaurant supply garden on a Brooklyn rooftop, Marty chronicles changing attitudes and offers advice on keeping livestock in the city, decontaminating toxic soil, and even changing zoning laws.

    Marty is an ethno-botanist, former assistant garden editor for Southern Living magazine and founder of the Jones Valley Urban Farm in Birmingham, Alabama.

  • Author Brandon G. Kinney explores the complex series of events that led to Missouri’s brief but bloody Mormon War of 1838, a conflict over religion, ideology, and land.
    Brandon G. Kinney: The Mormon War of 1838
    Sunday, June 24, 2012
    Central Library

    Author Brandon G. Kinney explores the complex series of events that led to the brief but bloody Mormon War of 1838, a conflict over religion, ideology, and land pitting Joseph Smith and his Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints against other Missouri residents, the governor, and the state militia.

    Kinney is a graduate of the Creighton University School of Law and practices law in Butler, Missouri. He is the author of The Mormon War: Zion and the Missouri Extermination Order of 1838.

  • When her husband, President Woodrow Wilson, suffered a stroke in 1919, did Edith Wilson control the reins of power to become, in effect, our first woman president?
    Kristie Miller: Edith Bolling Wilson
    Thursday, June 21, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    Flamboyant, confident, and controversial, Edith Bolling Wilson was not your traditional First Lady. After her husband, Woodrow Wilson, suffered a debilitating stroke in 1919, she took the reins of government and acted on behalf of her ailing spouse. Historian Kristie Miller looks into the life of the woman known as “Madame Regent” and “the Assistant President” and asks: Was Edith Wilson, in effect, our first woman president?

  • Author Max Holland delves into the mystery of Mark Felt, the FBI official who as the legendary “Deep Throat” helped bring down the presidency of Richard Nixon.
    Max Holland - Leak: Why Mark Felt Became Deep Throat
    Monday, June 18, 2012
    Central Library

    Author Max Holland delves into the enigma that is Mark Felt (1913-2008), the FBI official who as the mysterious Deep Throat shared with reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein insider information on the Watergate scandal and by doing so helped to bring down President Richard Nixon.

  • Philip E. Auerswald predicts that a new wave of entrepreneurship will improve the lives not only of the previously excluded global majority, but also the citizens of the industrialized nations.
    Philip E. Auerswald - The Coming Prosperity: How Entrepreneurs Are Transforming the Global Economy
    Tuesday, June 12, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    In his new book, Philip E. Auerswald envisions an optimistic future in which forward-thinking entrepreneurs emerge from cultures around the world to tackle challenges like climate change, water scarcity, and rapid urbanization. By introducing new goods and services while challenging established business interests, these visionaries will improve the lives not only of the previously excluded global majority, but also of the citizens of the industrialized nations.

  • A survivor of a Nazi concentration camp and a veteran of the U.S. Special Forces, Major General Sid Shachnow relates highlights of the incredible life recorded in his memoir Hope and Honor.
    Maj. Gen. Sid Shachnow: Hope and Honor
    Tuesday, June 12, 2012
    Central Library

    Sid Shachnow discusses his new memoir Hope and Honor, which traces his life from a childhood spent in the notorious Kovno concentration camp to his rise to the rank of Major General in the U.S. Army.

    Born in Lithuania in 1934, Sid Shachnow spent three years in a Nazi concentration camp. With most of his family dead, he escaped both the Nazis and the Soviets and immigrated to the United States.

    Co-sponsored by the Command and General Staff College Foundation, Inc.

  • Military historian Ethan S. Rafuse delves into the life and accomplishments of Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson, perhaps the Confederacy’s greatest military strategist.
    Ethan S. Rafuse: “Stonewall” Jackson
    Thursday, June 7, 2012
    Central Library

    Ethan S. Rafuse of the military history department of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the life and accomplishments of Thomas Jonathan “Stonewall” Jackson.

  • Walter Cronkite biographer Douglas Brinkley looks at the life and career of the CBS newsman who became “Uncle Walter,” the most trusted man in America.
    Douglas Brinkley: Cronkite
    Tuesday, June 5, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    Biographer Douglas Brinkley looks at the life and career of CBS newsman Walter Cronkite, the St. Joseph native who became the most trusted man in America. Drawing on newly disclosed letters, diaries and interviews with nearly 200 of Cronkite’s friends and colleagues, Cronkite reveals not an icon but a real human with passions, loves, and occasional enmities.