Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • Barron H. Lerner – professor of medicine and public health at Columbia University – discusses his new book One for the Road and explains why, after decades of warning, people continue to drink and drive.
    Barron H. Lerner - One for the Road: Drunk Driving Since 1900
    Thursday, December 1, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Barron H. Lerner – professor of medicine and public health at Columbia University – discusses his new book One for the Road and explains why, after decades of warning, people continue to drink and drive.

    Lerner examines drunk driving in the context of American beliefs about alcoholism, driving, individualism, and civil liberties and narrates the debate between two factions: those vehemently against drunk driving and those who say the problem is exaggerated.

  • Shawn Faulkner of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College explains the motivation of Civil War soldiers to fight and endure the hardships of war.
    Shawn Faulkner: Jonny Reb and Billy Yank
    Wednesday, November 30, 2011
    Central Library

    Shawn Faulkner of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the conditions faced by the average Civil War soldier – on and off the battlefield – in a presentation titled Jonny Reb and Billy Yank.

    Faulkner explains the many factors that shaped the daily lives of the soldiers, including the quality and availability of food, clothing, shelter and medical care. Faulkner also answers the question: What motivated soldiers on both sides to fight and to endure the hardships of war?

  • Authors James Leiker and Ramon Powers recount the epic story of the escape of the Cheyennes from their Indian Territory reservation and their arduous trek to their northern homeland.
    James Leiker & Ramon Powers: The Northern Cheyenne Exodus in History and Memory
    Sunday, November 20, 2011
    Central Library

    Drawing from their book, The Northern Cheyenne Exodus in History and Memory, authors James Leiker and Ramon Powers recount the epic story of the escape of the Cheyennes from their Indian Territory reservation and their arduous trek to their northern homeland.

  • The Bach Aria Soloists bring to life the drama of the cherished children’s classic Ferdinand the Bull with music by English composer Alan Ridout, performed by violinist Elizabeth Suh Lane and further interpreted by actor Stuart Rider.
    Bach Aria Soloists: Musical Tales featuring Ferdinand the Bull
    Saturday, November 19, 2011
    Central Library

    The Bach Aria Soloists bring to life the humor and drama of the cherished children’s classic Ferdinand the Bull with music by English composer Alan Ridout, performed by violinist Elizabeth Suh Lane and further interpreted by actor Stuart Rider.

    This performance includes musical and theatrical interpretations of Roger Quilter compositions based on Shakespeare's "As You Like It," as well as Franz Schubert's "Die Spinnrade," based on Goethe poems.

  • To close out Global Entrepreneurship Week,  Clara Reyes discusses how her newspaper, Dos Mundos, has grown to become an innovative, beneficial source of information and education for the Hispanic community.
    A Conversation with Clara Reyes
    Friday, November 18, 2011
    Central Library

    Global Entrepreneurship Week closes as Library Director Crosby Kemper III conducts a public conversation with Clara Reyes, founder of the Kansas City bilingual newspaper, Dos Mundos.

  • Jamie Van Leeuwen, senior policy advisor to Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, offers a briefing on Denver’s Road Home program aimed at addressing chronic homelessness in the Mile High City.
    Jamie Van Leeuwen: A Blueprint To End Homelessness
    Friday, November 18, 2011
    Central Library

    Jamie Van Leeuwen, senior policy advisor to Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, offers a briefing on Denver’s Road Home program aimed at addressing chronic homelessness in the Mile High City, on Friday, November 18, 2011 at 8 a.m. at the Kansas City Public Library, 14 W. 10th St. Kansas City Mayor Sly James introduces the session and delivers opening remarks.

  • The Writers at Work series returns with Winter’s Bone author Daniel Woodrell discussing his new collection of short stories, The Outlaw Album, in a public conversation with Kansas City author Whitney Terrell.
    Daniel Woodrell: The Outlaw Album
    Thursday, November 17, 2011
    Central Library

    Author Daniel Woodrell discusses his new collection of short stories, The Outlaw Album, in a discussion led by Kansas City’s own Whitney Terrell.

    The Outlaw Album includes the stories of a husband who cruelly avenges the killing of his wife’s pet, and an injured rapist who is cared for by a young girl until she reaches her breaking point.

    Organized by Whitney Terrell and co-sponsored by the Writers at Work Round Table.

  • Ollie Gates discusses how his family restaurant, Gates Bar-B-Q, has served as a tasty calling card for Kansas City on the national food scene since its inception in 1946.
    A Conversation with Ollie Gates
    Wednesday, November 16, 2011
    Central Library

    For more than 60 years, the name Ollie Gates has been synonymous with Kansas City-style barbeque, sauces, and their trademark greeting, “Hi! May I help you?” Reception courtesy of Gates Bar-B-Q.

  • Swedish author Steve Sem-Sandberg discusses his award-winning novel The Emperor of Lies – a work of historical fiction set in the Lódz ghetto and centered on its controversial leader Mordechai Chaim Rumkowski.
    Steve Sem-Sandberg - Emperor of Lies: A Novel
    Tuesday, November 15, 2011
    Central Library

    In February 1940, the Nazis established what would become the second largest Jewish ghetto in Poland. The ghetto’s chosen leader, Mordechai Chaim Rumkowski, realized that his survival rested on his ability to make the ghetto indispensable and set out to transform it into a productive industrial complex, forcing adults and children to work punishing hours to provide supplies for the German military.

  • Pulitzer Prize-winning book critic Michael Dirda presents an insider’s account of The Baker Street Irregulars – an association of Holmes fanatics who delight in playful scholarship relating to the most famous detective of all time.
    Michael Dirda - On Conan Doyle: or, The Whole Art of Storytelling
    Monday, November 14, 2011
    Central Library

    A lifelong fan of the Sherlock Holmes adventures, Pulitzer Prize-winning book critic Michael Dirdaa presents an insider’s account of The Baker Street Irregulars – a worldwide association of Holmes fanatics who delight in curious and playful scholarship relating to the most famous detective of all time.