Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • Historian Terry Beckenbaugh of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College discusses the first year of the Civil War with an emphasis on battles and events that took place in Missouri.
    Terry Beckenbaugh: The First Year of the Civil War in Missouri
    Thursday, October 27, 2011
    Central Library

    Historian Terry Beckenbaugh of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses The First Year of the Civil War in Missouri.

  • Author Tracy Daugherty marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of Catch-22 with a presentation based on his new book, Just One Catch, the first major biography of Joseph Heller.
    Tracy Daugherty - Just One Catch: A Biography of Joseph Heller
    Wednesday, October 26, 2011
    Central Library

    Joseph Heller was a Coney Island kid, the son of Russian immigrants, and a military veteran whose experiences flying missions over France during World War II would become the inspiration for an American classic, Catch-22. When he passed away in 1999, Heller left behind a body of work, including the novels Something Happened and Good as Gold, that remain in print.

  • The Kansas City Star’s Steve Paul discusses his new book, a collection of “KC Architecture A-Z” columns that have appeared in Star Magazine. The book contains more than 200 photographs of Kansas City’s architectural scene.
    Steve Paul: KC Architecture A to Z
    Tuesday, October 25, 2011
    Central Library

    Architecture A-Z began as a Star Magazine feature based on a simple concept: What can we learn and share about Kansas City’s history and contemporary scene if we take a simple walk through the alphabet?

  • James Young, noted authority on memorial architecture, discusses architecture’s capacity for reflecting evolving narratives and mediating public spaces and personal memories.
    James Young: Stages of Memory in Berlin and New York After 9/11
    Sunday, October 23, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    James Young, noted authority on memorial architecture, and a juror for New York’s World Trade Center Memorial Site competition and Berlin’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, discusses architecture’s capacity for reflecting evolving narratives and mediating public spaces and personal memories. Young is distinguished professor of English and Judaic Studies, and director of the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

  • Archaeologist Dan L. Davis,  explains how he helped direct the first scientific excavation of two ancient deep-water wrecks in the Black Sea using a remotely operated vehicle.
    Dan L. Davis - Exploring in Jason’s Wake: Deepwater Archaeology in the Black Sea
    Thursday, October 20, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    The Black Sea once served as a maritime highway for ancient and medieval cultures. In its depths, an international team of archaeologists and oceanographers are now discovering shipwrecks using the latest in robotic and digital imaging technology.

  • CKE Restaurants Chief Executive Officer Andrew Puzder shares his views on job creation and explains why he believes government attempts to orchestrate labor markets usually backfire.
    Andrew Puzder - Job Creation: How It Really Works and Why Government Doesn’t Understand It
    Wednesday, October 19, 2011
    Central Library

    CKE Restaurants Chief Executive Officer Andrew Puzder shares his views on job creation and explains why he believes attempts by the government to orchestrate labor markets usually backfire.

    Puzder contends that the American private sector has always been the initiator of new employment, and consistently introduced the products and service innovations that put millions of people to work.

    Co-sponsored by the Show-Me Institute and Sinquefield Charitable Foundation.

  • Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III launches its second season with a conversation with Mark Twain, as portrayed by veteran Chautauqua performer George Frein.
    Meet the Past: Mark Twain
    Tuesday, October 18, 2011
    Central Library

    Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III launches its second season with a conversation with Mark Twain, as portrayed by veteran Chautauqua performer George Frein.

    Mark Twain’s novels, including The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, established him as one of the great American writers, while some accounts (like that of Ernest Hemingway) cite him as the source of American literature.

  • Supreme Discomfort, written by Washington Post staffers  Kevin Merida and Michael Fletcher, tracks Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas from his poor childhood to his law school years, to his rise within the Republican political establishment.
    Kevin Merida & Michael Fletcher: Supreme Discomfort
    Monday, October 17, 2011
    Central Library

    Supreme Discomfort, written by Washington Post staffers Kevin Merida and Michael Fletcher, tracks the odyssey of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas from his poor childhood in Georgia to his law school years at Yale, to his rise within the Republican political establishment.

    The book paints a haunting portrait of a man who straddles two different worlds, uneasy in both, and whose divided personality and conservative political philosophy will deeply influence American life for years to come.

  • In conjunction with the world-premiere of “The Darwin Project,” British scientist Andrew Berry demystifies the most important and misinterpreted of all biological ideas: evolution.
    Andrew Berry: Charles Darwin’s Theory Today
    Thursday, October 13, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    In conjunction with the world-premiere of “The Darwin Project,” an upcoming co-presentation of The Friends of Chamber Music and the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, British scientist Andrew Berry demystifies the most important and misinterpreted of all biological ideas: evolution. A lecturer in Organismic & Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, Berry’s research is dedicated to finding evidence of Darwin’s Theory of Natural Selection at the DNA level.

  • Public art inspires dialogue, provides visual appeal, and engages its viewers. This panel, moderated by Porter Arneill, includes Jacqueline Chanda, Julian Zugazagoitia, and Mike Burke.
    Public Art/Civic Catalyst – A Local Perspective
    Wednesday, October 12, 2011
    Central Library

    Public art inspires dialogue, provides visual appeal, and engages its viewers. This panel, moderated by Porter Arneill, public art administrator for Kansas City includes Jacqueline Chanda, president, Kansas City Art Institute; Julian Zugazagoitia, chief executive officer, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art; and Mike Burke, King Hershey, P.C., and member Mayor’s Task Force for the Arts.

    Co-sponsored by Art in the Loop, Downtown Council and Municipal Art Commission of Kansas City, Missouri.