Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • Australian motivational speaker and personal trainer M.D. “Dorsal” Finn discusses his book The Vulture Perspective, which he calls “a self-help book for the average Joe six-pack.”
    Denis Finn - The Vulture Perspective: A Real Man’s Guide to a Happy, Successful Life
    Tuesday, September 13, 2011
    Central Library

    Australian motivational speaker and personal trainer M.D. “Dorsal” Finn discusses his book, The Vulture Perspective, which has been billed a “self-help book for the average Joe six-pack.”

    Finn considers the book to be an instructional manual for the game of life. He seeks to help men (and women) find the answers to all of life’s big questions and covers subjects ranging from choosing a partner to living a balanced life to careers, success, and wealth.

    Finn recently published his second book, The Female Vulture Perspective.

  • Author and former Kansas City resident Justin Martin discusses his new biography of renowned landscape architect, abolitionist, and early environmentalist Frederick Law Olmsted.
    Justin Martin - Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted
    Wednesday, September 7, 2011
    Central Library

    Author and former Kansas City resident Justin Martin discusses his latest book, Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted, a biography of the renowned landscape architect, early environmentalist, and abolitionist.

  • Karen Cox explains how northern-based advertisers, manufacturers, musicians, writers, and filmmakers fashioned a romantic version of Dixieland to push products, calm anxiety about modernity – and maintain a racist status-quo.
    Karen Cox - Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture
    Tuesday, August 30, 2011
    Central Library

    From the late nineteenth century through World War II, popular culture portrayed the American South as a region ensconced in its antebellum past, draped in moonlight and magnolias, and represented by such southern icons as the mammy, the belle, the chivalrous planter, white-columned mansions, and even bolls of cotton. But what if this constructed nostalgia for the Old South was actually manufactured by outsiders?

  • Cricket enthusiast Martin Rowe discusses the parallel and occasionally intertwined history of baseball and cricket.
    Martin Rowe: Right Off the Bat
    Wednesday, August 24, 2011
    Central Library

    Cricket buff Martin Rowe, co-author of Right Off the Bat, explains the parallel and occasionally intertwined history of baseball and cricket in a presentation that includes anecdotes, diagrams, photographs, and a curve (or dipper) or two.

    Along the way, Rowe examines how the two sports mirrored British and American social and racial struggles while expanding beyond the shores of their founding countries to become multinational endeavors commanding global followings that now challenge the future of both sports.

  • Library Director Crosby Kemper III leads a public conversation with Boulevard Brewing Company founder John McDonald exploring how his award-winning company became the largest craft brewer in the Midwest and the largest independent American brewer  in Missouri.
    A Conversation with John McDonald
    Wednesday, August 3, 2011
    Central Library

    Join a public conversation with local brewing pioneer John McDonald, founder of Boulevard Brewing Company.

    McDonald, recently named the 2011 Brewers Association Recognition Award winner, started the brewery in 1989 and hand delivered Boulevard beer to local restaurants in his pick-up truck. Today, his company employs over 90 people.

    Since 1989, the award-winning company has grown to become the largest craft brewer in the Midwest and the largest independent American brewer in Missouri.

  • John Ferling discusses his compelling and accessible one-volume chronicle of the most pivotal period in America’s history, the battle in the Continental Congress over declaring American independence.
    John Ferling - Independence: The Struggle To Set America Free
    Wednesday, July 27, 2011
    Central Library

    No event in American history was more pivotal — or more contested — than the decision by Congress to declare independence in July 1776. Even months after American blood had been shed at Lexington and Concord, many colonists remained loyal to Britain.

  • Representatives from the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum discuss the scientific, social, and political changes that took place during the Eisenhower presidency. The talk complements a new exhibit on display at the Museum in Abilene, Kansas.
    Eisenhower: Agent of Change
    Thursday, July 21, 2011
    Central Library

    Often referred to as eight years of peace and prosperity, the administration of President Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953-61) was in fact an era of great scientific, social, and political changes. Some were positive, others negative—but all came at a price and greatly affected the lives of the American people.

  • Timothy Noel Tegge, clown, illusionist, ringmaster, and curator of the Tegge Circus Archives,  speaks about his experiences in the circus and provides insight into the Reckless Beauty and Mounting Laughter exhibit.
    Timothy Noel Tegge - Reckless Beauty and Mounting Laughter
    Wednesday, July 20, 2011
    Central Library

    Born to a circus-clown father, Timothy Noel Tegge began performing in the ring by age 5. Today, while still working as a clown, he also acts as a circus illusionist, ringmaster, and performance director—and is curator of the Tegge Circus Archives, a repository of circus posters and ephemera he began collecting as a child.

  • Columbia University marketing expert David Rogers examines how digital technologies—from smartphones to social network— connect us in networks that  transform our relationships to businesses and each other.
    David Rogers - The Network Is Your Customer: Five Strategies To Thrive in a Digital Age
    Thursday, June 30, 2011
    Central Library

    Marketing expert David Rogers, executive director of the Center on Global Brand Leadership at Columbia Business School, examines how digital technologies — from smartphones to social networks — connect us in networks that transform our relationships to businesses and each other.

  • Emory University historian Deborah E. Lipstadt examines the May 1960 capture of SS Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann by Israeli agents in Argentina and his  subsequent trial that electrified  the world.
    Deborah E. Lipstadt: The Eichmann Trial
    Wednesday, June 29, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Emory University historian Deborah E. Lipstadt examines the May 1960 capture of SS Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann by Israeli agents in Argentina and his subsequent trial that electrified the world.