Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • Kief Schladweiler from the Foundation Center in New York hosts two workshops intended to help not-for-profit groups and individual grant seekers find additional revenue sources.
    Grant Seeking 101: Getting Started with Foundation Grants to Individuals Online
    Wednesday, May 18, 2011
    Central Library

    Kief Schladweiler from the Foundation Center in New York hosts two workshops intended to help not-for-profit groups and individual grant seekers find additional revenue sources on Wednesday, May 18, 2011.

  • Grant Seeking 101: Proposal Writing Basics and Introduction to Philanthropy In/Sight
    Wednesday, May 18, 2011
    Central Library

    Kief Schladweiler from the Foundation Center in New York hosts two workshops intended to help not-for-profit groups and individual grant seekers find additional revenue sources on Wednesday, May 18, 2011.

  • Robert Rydell discusses the Depression-era World’s Fairs that gave hope to millions and offered visions of future progress.
    Robert Rydell - Designing Tomorrow: America’s World’s Fairs of the 1930s
    Tuesday, May 17, 2011
    Central Library

    The World’s Fairs that took place in the United States during the Great Depression of the 1930s gave hope to millions and offered visions of future progress. These grand expositions showcased an optimistic, consumerist future.

  • Author Bonar Menninger discusses his new book about the massive EF-5 tornado that on June 8, 1966, cut a 22-mile swath across eastern Kansas before smashing through Topeka.
    Bonar Menninger: And Hell Followed With It
    Sunday, May 15, 2011
    Central Library

    On June 8, 1966, a massive EF-5 tornado cut a 22-mile swath across eastern Kansas before smashing through Topeka.

    Author Bonar Menninger recounts the events of that tragic day in his new book, And Hell Followed With It, for which he interviewed dozens of survivors to construct a tightly woven narrative that conveys in gut-wrenching detail what it’s like when nature careens out of control.

  • Historian John Curatola of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the military career of Curtis LeMay, the man credited with an effective, but controversial, incendiary bombing campaign during World War II.
    Great Commanders Series: Curtis LeMay
    Thursday, May 12, 2011
    Central Library

    John Curatola of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the military career of General Curtis LeMay.

  • Award-winning author Leo Damrosch discusses his book on Alexis de Tocqueville, who helped define a fledgling nation by writing about his nine-month tour of America in the 1830s.
    Leo Damrosch: Tocqueville’s Discovery of America
    Tuesday, May 10, 2011
    Central Library

    Award-winning author Leo Damrosch discusses his new biography, Tocqueville’s Discovery of America.

  • On the 50th anniversary of Alan Shepard's pioneering space mission, Roger D. Launius of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum reconsiders the legacy of Project Mercury and America's first astronauts.
    Roger D. Launius - The Right Stuff Revisited: Project Mercury 50 Years On
    Thursday, May 5, 2011
    Central Library

    On May 5, 1961, Alan Shepard became the first American in space, making a brief suborbital mission that marked the first manned launch of Project Mercury.

    Roger D. Launius, a senior curator at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, reconsiders NASA’s pioneering program, examining the origins of these first attempts to reach into space, the Cold War “space race,” and Project Mercury’s meaning a half-century later.

  • Gregorio Luke offers a blow-by-blow description of the Battle of Puebla in 1862 in a multimedia presentation featuring paintings, illustrations, and maps.
    Gregorio Luke: Cinco de Mayo
    Wednesday, May 4, 2011
    Central Library

    Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Mexican victory over the French invaders at the Battle of Puebla in1862. Now one of the most popular celebrations in the Latino community, it is an inspiration for the oppressed everywhere and an example that no army however powerful can overcome a united and determined people.

    On Wednesday, May 4, 2011, distinguished Mexican lecturer Gregorio Luke offers a blow by blow description of the battle plus historical background on the attempt by France to turn Mexico into a colony during the 1860s in a multimedia presentation featuring period paintings, illustrations, and maps. The program takes place at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., and begins at 6 p.m.

  • On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland boarded a friend’s yacht, sailed into the waters and vanished. Author Matthew Algeo discusses his new book, the first full account of the president’s disappearance and the medical condition that necessitated it.
    Matthew Algeo: The President Is a Sick Man
    Tuesday, May 3, 2011
    Central Library

    On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland boarded a friend’s yacht, sailed into the waters of Long Island Sound, and disappeared. What happened was so incredible that, even when the truth was finally revealed, many Americans would not believe it.

  • Best-selling author Arthur Phillips discusses his new novel, The Tragedy of Arthur, in a public conversation with Angela Elam of New Letters on the Air.
    Arthur Phillips: The Tragedy of Arthur
    Wednesday, April 27, 2011
    Central Library

    Bestselling author Arthur Phillips discusses his new novel, The Tragedy of Arthur.