Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • On the 50th anniversary of Alan Shepard's pioneering space mission, Roger D. Launius of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum reconsiders the legacy of Project Mercury and America's first astronauts.
    Roger D. Launius - The Right Stuff Revisited: Project Mercury 50 Years On
    Thursday, May 5, 2011
    Central Library

    On May 5, 1961, Alan Shepard became the first American in space, making a brief suborbital mission that marked the first manned launch of Project Mercury.

    Roger D. Launius, a senior curator at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, reconsiders NASA’s pioneering program, examining the origins of these first attempts to reach into space, the Cold War “space race,” and Project Mercury’s meaning a half-century later.

  • Gregorio Luke offers a blow-by-blow description of the Battle of Puebla in 1862 in a multimedia presentation featuring paintings, illustrations, and maps.
    Gregorio Luke: Cinco de Mayo
    Wednesday, May 4, 2011
    Central Library

    Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Mexican victory over the French invaders at the Battle of Puebla in1862. Now one of the most popular celebrations in the Latino community, it is an inspiration for the oppressed everywhere and an example that no army however powerful can overcome a united and determined people.

    On Wednesday, May 4, 2011, distinguished Mexican lecturer Gregorio Luke offers a blow by blow description of the battle plus historical background on the attempt by France to turn Mexico into a colony during the 1860s in a multimedia presentation featuring period paintings, illustrations, and maps. The program takes place at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., and begins at 6 p.m.

  • On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland boarded a friend’s yacht, sailed into the waters and vanished. Author Matthew Algeo discusses his new book, the first full account of the president’s disappearance and the medical condition that necessitated it.
    Matthew Algeo: The President Is a Sick Man
    Tuesday, May 3, 2011
    Central Library

    On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland boarded a friend’s yacht, sailed into the waters of Long Island Sound, and disappeared. What happened was so incredible that, even when the truth was finally revealed, many Americans would not believe it.

  • Best-selling author Arthur Phillips discusses his new novel, The Tragedy of Arthur, in a public conversation with Angela Elam of New Letters on the Air.
    Arthur Phillips: The Tragedy of Arthur
    Wednesday, April 27, 2011
    Central Library

    Bestselling author Arthur Phillips discusses his new novel, The Tragedy of Arthur.

  • One of the prime movers of the neighborhood revivals of New York’s Soho and Miami’s South Beach, Tony Goldman shares his experiences as an innovative real estate development leader.
    Tony Goldman: Re-Developing the Future
    Monday, April 18, 2011
    Central Library

    One of the prime movers of the neighborhood revivals of New York’s Soho and Miami’s South Beach, Tony Goldman shares his experiences as an innovative real estate development leader who has helped transform the urban landscape in four major U.S. cities while redefining the way people inhabit communities in America.

  • Longtime FBI agent William Ouseley discusses his new book about the family that ruled organized crime in Kansas City for three decades, during which time bodies turned up in car trunks, gunfire was exchanged in restaurants, and buildings were blown up.
    Bill Ouseley - Mobsters In Our Midst: The Civella Crime Family of Kansas City
    Sunday, April 17, 2011
    Central Library

    Organized crime formed part of the political, economic, and social fabric of Kansas City for much of the 20th century; and the mob’s power was never greater than in the three decades it was ruled by Nick Civella.

  • Historian Mark Gerges of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses Napoleon Bonaparte, the French emperor whose real life often differs from the English-speaking world’s stereotype.
    Mark Gerges: Napoleon Bonaparte
    Thursday, April 14, 2011

    Mark Gerges of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the influence and accomplishments of Napoleon Bonaparte.

  • International relations scholar John Mearsheimer offers a comprehensive examination of the strategic lies told in international politics.
    John Mearsheimer - Why Leaders Lie: The Truth About Lying in International Politics
    Wednesday, April 6, 2011
    Central Library

    International relations scholar John Mearsheimer from the University of Chicago discusses his new book, Why Leaders Lie, a comprehensive examination of the strategic lies told in international politics.

  • On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked Union-held Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. Military historian Ethan Rafuse discusses the battle and the effect it had on a nation that had feared a civil war for months before the first shots were fired.
    Ethan Rafuse : The Attack on Fort Sumter
    Tuesday, April 5, 2011
    Central Library

    On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked Union-held Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, ending an excruciating period of uncertainty and marking the start of the most destructive war ever waged on American soil—the Civil War.

    To mark the 150th anniversary of the battle at Fort Sumter, historian Ethan Rafuse of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the events leading up to the attack, the battle itself, and the effect it had on the nation.

  • Julian Zugazagoitia: Francisco Toledo’s Muse
    Monday, April 4, 2011
    Central Library

    Julian Zugazagoitia, director of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, interprets the life and art of Francisco Toledo, one of today’s most important Mexican artists.