Event Audio

All Library locations will be closed on Sunday, April 20, in observance of the Easter holiday.

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • Joelouis Mattox discusses his series in The Kansas City Call about the NAACP and the history of African-American activism.
    Joelouis Mattox: The NAACP, Bound for the "Promised Land"
    Sunday, June 20, 2010
    Central Library

     Joelouis Mattox discusses his series of articles in the Kansas City Call about the NAACP and the history of African-American activism on Sunday, June 20, at 2 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

    Mattox will share information about Roy Wilkins, a former managing editor of The Call and longtime executive director of the NAACP; the history of the NAACP Kansas City branch, The Branch on the Vine; and President Truman’s support for civil rights. 

  • After a volcanic cloud over much of Europe postponed his presentation in April, Matthew Bishop, U.S. business editor for The Economist, will be in Kansas City to share his thoughts on the economy and capitalism’s future.
    Matthew Bishop: The Road from Ruin
    Thursday, June 17, 2010
    Central Library

    Matthew Bishop discusses his new book, The Road from Ruin: How to Revive Capitalism and Put America Back on Top, and shares his thoughts on the economy and capitalism’s future.  His scheduled visit in April was postponed when Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull halted travel.

    Bishop, the U.S. business editor for The Economist, says we should learn from past financial crises to map the way to a reformed 21st century capitalism.

  • Reporter and urban planning policy expert Anthony Flint discusses his new book Wrestling with Moses: How Jane Jacobs Took on New York’s Master Builder and Transformed the American City.
    Anthony Flint: Wrestling with Moses
    Wednesday, June 16, 2010
    Central Library

    Reporter and urban planning policy expert Anthony Flint discusses his new book Wrestling with Moses: How Jane Jacobs Took on New York’s Master Builder and Transformed the American City on Wednesday, June 16, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

  • Robin Stone discusses the life  of her late husband Gerald Boyd, including his rise to become the first black managing editor of  The New York Times and his  devastating fall in the wake of  the Jayson Blair scandal.
    Robin Stone: My Times in Black and White
    Thursday, June 10, 2010
    Central Library

    Robin Stone, who wrote the afterward for her late husband Gerald Boyd’s memoir, discusses the book and Boyd’s life, including his rise to become the first black managing editor of The New York Times and his devastating fall on Thursday, June 10, at 6:30 p.m.. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

  • Kansas native Ande Parks discusses his work with graphic novels and explains his belief that they are an important art form, capable of telling any kind of story uniquely and effectively.
    Ande Parks: Graphic Novels as Art and Literature
    Wednesday, June 9, 2010
    Central Library

    Kansas native Ande Parks discusses his two graphic novels, Union Station and Capote in Kansas, and their form as art and literature on Wednesday, June 9, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

  • Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Russo discusses his new novel about marriage and all of the other ties that bind.
    Richard Russo: That Old Cape Magic
    Tuesday, June 8, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Russo discusses his new novel about marriage and all of the other ties that bind, from parents and in-laws to children and the promises of youth.

    That Old Cape Magic is a novel of deep introspection and every family feeling imaginable, with a middle-aged man confronting his parents and their failed marriage, his own troubled one, his daughter’s new life, and, finally, what it was he thought he wanted and what in fact he has.

  • In-depth discussions of five sacred structures that inspire those within and without.
    Historic Churches of Kansas City
    Sunday, June 6, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Helix architect Reeves Wiedeman discusses the recent renovation of this structure and offers historical highlights of St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church, the unique shape of which has made it an architectural favorite.

  • New York-based writer Elizabeth Bettina tells the  amazing story of how thousands  of Jews in Italy were saved during World War II.
    Elizabeth Bettina: It Happened in Italy
    Thursday, June 3, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    New York-based writer Elizabeth Bettina, discusses her book It Happened in Italy: Untold Stories of How the People of Italy Defied the Horrors of the Holocaust on Thursday, June 3, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

    It Happened in Italy tells the amazing story of how thousands of Jews in Italy were saved during World War II.

  • Newsweek senior editor Jonathan Alter discusses his new book, a detailed examination of President Barack Obama’s first year in office.
    Jonathan Alter: The Promise: President Obama, Year One
    Wednesday, June 2, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Newsweek Senior Editor Jonathan Alter discusses his new book The Promise: President Obama, Year One on Wednesday, June 2, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

    The Promise is the first detailed examination of President Barack Obama’s first year in office and offers an insider’s look at Obama’s decisions and accomplishments.

  • Veteran journalist James McCommons presents Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service – A Year Spent Riding Across America, a book that is equal parts travel narrative, personal memoir, and investigative journalism.
    James McCommons: Waiting on a Train, The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service
    Thursday, May 27, 2010
    Central Library

    Veteran journalist James McCommons discusses his new book that is equal parts travel narrative, personal memoir, and investigative journalism.

    McCommons explores how the country may move passenger rail forward in America—and what role government should play in creating and funding mass-transportation systems. Against the backdrop of the nation’s stimulus program, he explores what it will take to build high-speed trains and transportation networks, and when the promise of rail will be realized in America.

    The book will be available for sale.