Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • Don Lambert discusses the efforts of 40 anti-slavery "free-staters" whose so-called Topeka Constitution helped lead to Kansas' eventual entry into the Union as a free state.
    Don Lambert: Against All Odds
    Sunday, July 18, 2010
    Central Library

    Don Lambert discusses the efforts of 40 men and women whose so-called Topeka Constitution marked a milestone on the road Kansas would take to eventually enter the Union as a free state on Sunday, July 18, at 2 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

    On March 30, 1855, a mass influx from Missouri of several thousand armed "border ruffians" overwhelmed voting for delegates to the first Kansas Territorial Legislature, resulting in a landslide victory for proslavery adherents.

  • Baseball historian G. Michael Green discusses his new book, the first full biography of former Athletics owner Charlie Finley.
    G. Michael Green: Charlie Finley
    Thursday, July 15, 2010
    Central Library

    Baseball historian G. Michael Green discusses his new biography of Charlie Finley, the former owner of the Athletics who moved the team from Kansas City to Oakland, on Thursday, July 15, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

  • The best-selling author of The Time Traveler’s Wife discusses her latest novel, Her Fearful Symmetry.
    Audrey Niffenegger: Her Fearful Symmetry
    Wednesday, July 14, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Audrey Niffenegger, author of the bestselling The Time Traveler's Wife, discusses her new novel, Her Fearful Symmetry, a story about the complications of love, identity, and sibling rivalry.

    When Elspeth Noblin dies, she leaves her apartment to her American twin nieces, Julia and Valentina.

  • Harry S. Truman Book Award winner Steven Casey explains how the Truman and Eisenhower administrations shaped public opinion and influenced the media during the Korean War.
    Steven Casey: Selling the Korean War
    Tuesday, July 13, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Steven Casey discusses his new book Selling the Korean War: Propaganda, Politics, and Public Opinion in the United States on Tuesday, July 13, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

    The book, which won the 2010 Harry S. Truman Book Award, explains how the Truman and Eisenhower administrations shaped public discourse about the Korean War, influenced media, and gained political and public support.

  • Exhibit creator Joseph Opala draws on his 30 years of research to discuss Bunce Island’s history and ties to the American slave trade.
    Joseph Opala: Bunce Island
    Thursday, July 8, 2010
    Central Library

    Joseph Opala, the exhibit creator for Bunce Island: A British Slave Castle in Sierra Leone, draws on his 30 years of research to discuss Bunce Island’s history and ties to the American slave trade. From this site off the coast of West Africa, slave traders sent nearly 30,000 African captives to the Americas from 1670 to 1807. Many were shipped to South Carolina and Georgia. The Gullah who live in this region today are descendants of these slaves.

  • Just in time for Independence Day, William Hogeland discusses his new book that reveals how the American Revolution really began.
    William Hogeland: Declaration, The Nine Tumultuous Weeks When America Became Independent
    Thursday, July 1, 2010
    Central Library

    Just in time for Independence Day, William Hogeland presents new research and top-notch scholarship to reveal how the American Revolution really began.

  • In-depth discussions of five sacred structures that inspire those within and without.
    Historic Churches of Kansas City
    Sunday, June 27, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Architect Paul Helmer examines the classical design of Central Presbyterian Church and Grand Avenue Temple United Methodist Church, which share similar histories and architectural designs.

  • The Festival Internacional de Música Española y Latinoamericana (FIMEL) presents the second annual International Festival of Spanish and Latin American Music.
    International Festival of Spanish and Latin American Music
    Thursday, June 24, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    With a mission to bring together master musicians, dancers, and young artists from across the world to "share the beauty and artistry of Spanish and Latin American music through study, collaboration, and performance," the Festival Internacional de Música Española y Latinoamericana (FIMEL) presents the second annual International Festival of Spanish and Latin American Music.

  • Joelouis Mattox discusses his series in The Kansas City Call about the NAACP and the history of African-American activism.
    Joelouis Mattox: The NAACP, Bound for the "Promised Land"
    Sunday, June 20, 2010
    Central Library

     Joelouis Mattox discusses his series of articles in the Kansas City Call about the NAACP and the history of African-American activism on Sunday, June 20, at 2 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

    Mattox will share information about Roy Wilkins, a former managing editor of The Call and longtime executive director of the NAACP; the history of the NAACP Kansas City branch, The Branch on the Vine; and President Truman’s support for civil rights. 

  • After a volcanic cloud over much of Europe postponed his presentation in April, Matthew Bishop, U.S. business editor for The Economist, will be in Kansas City to share his thoughts on the economy and capitalism’s future.
    Matthew Bishop: The Road from Ruin
    Thursday, June 17, 2010
    Central Library

    Matthew Bishop discusses his new book, The Road from Ruin: How to Revive Capitalism and Put America Back on Top, and shares his thoughts on the economy and capitalism’s future.  His scheduled visit in April was postponed when Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull halted travel.

    Bishop, the U.S. business editor for The Economist, says we should learn from past financial crises to map the way to a reformed 21st century capitalism.