Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • New York-based writer Elizabeth Bettina tells the  amazing story of how thousands  of Jews in Italy were saved during World War II.
    Elizabeth Bettina: It Happened in Italy
    Thursday, June 3, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    New York-based writer Elizabeth Bettina, discusses her book It Happened in Italy: Untold Stories of How the People of Italy Defied the Horrors of the Holocaust on Thursday, June 3, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

    It Happened in Italy tells the amazing story of how thousands of Jews in Italy were saved during World War II.

  • Newsweek senior editor Jonathan Alter discusses his new book, a detailed examination of President Barack Obama’s first year in office.
    Jonathan Alter: The Promise: President Obama, Year One
    Wednesday, June 2, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Newsweek Senior Editor Jonathan Alter discusses his new book The Promise: President Obama, Year One on Wednesday, June 2, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

    The Promise is the first detailed examination of President Barack Obama’s first year in office and offers an insider’s look at Obama’s decisions and accomplishments.

  • Veteran journalist James McCommons presents Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service – A Year Spent Riding Across America, a book that is equal parts travel narrative, personal memoir, and investigative journalism.
    James McCommons: Waiting on a Train, The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service
    Thursday, May 27, 2010
    Central Library

    Veteran journalist James McCommons discusses his new book that is equal parts travel narrative, personal memoir, and investigative journalism.

    McCommons explores how the country may move passenger rail forward in America—and what role government should play in creating and funding mass-transportation systems. Against the backdrop of the nation’s stimulus program, he explores what it will take to build high-speed trains and transportation networks, and when the promise of rail will be realized in America.

    The book will be available for sale.

  • Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Shirley Christian presents an original talk on Carrie Westlake Whitney, librarian and director of the Kansas City Public Library from the late 1800s to the early 1900s.
    Shirley Christian: Carrie Westlake Whitney
    Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    Central Library

    Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Shirley Christian presents an original talk on Carrie Westlake Whitney, librarian and director of the Kansas City Public Library from the late 1800s to the early 1900s.

  • Henry Adams provides new insights into two of the greatest artists of the 20th century when he presents Tom and Jack: The Intertwined Lives of Thomas Hart Benton and Jackson Pollock.
    Henry Adams: Tom and Jack, The Intertwined Lives of Thomas Hart Benton and Jackson Pollock
    Tuesday, May 25, 2010
    Central Library

    Henry Adams unfolds a poignant personal drama that provides new insights into two of the greatest artists of the 20th century when he presents his book, Tom and Jack: The Intertwined Lives of Thomas Hart Benton and Jackson Pollock.

  • The best-selling author of Life of Pi discusses his latest novel, Beatrice and Virgil, a story about a donkey and a howler monkey.
    Yann Martel: Beatrice and Virgil
    Thursday, May 20, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Best-selling Life of Pi author, Yann Martel, discusses his latest novel, Beatrice and Virgil, on Thursday, May 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

    Beatrice and Virgil is about asuccessful writer named Henry who becomes discouraged when his book about the Holocaust, a "flip book" made up of a novel and an essay that can be read in any order, is rejected by publishers.

  • National Book Award-winning author Nathaniel Philbrick discusses his new book about the Battle of Little Bighorn.
    Nathaniel Philbrick: The Last Stand
    Monday, May 17, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    National Book Award-winning author Nathaniel Philbrick discusses The Last Stand, his new book about the Battle of Little Bighorn.

    In his narrative, Philbrick sketches the two antagonists, Sitting Bull and George Armstrong Custer, and reminds readers that the Battle of the Little Bighorn was also, even in victory, the last stand for the Sioux and Cheyenne Indian nations. Philbrick evokes the history and geography of the Great Plains with an archetypal story of the American West, which continues to haunt imaginations.

  • Kenneth H. Winn tells the story  of Indian agent George Sibley and Ellen Lorr whose failure to marry touched off a legal and political battle in early 1800s Missouri.
    Kenneth H. Winn: George Sibley and Breach of Promise on the American Frontier
    Sunday, May 16, 2010
    Central Library

    Kenneth H. Winn tells the seldom-heard story of Indian agent George Sibley and Ellen Lorr, whose failure to marry touched off a legal and political battle in early 1800s Missouri, on Sunday, May 16, at 2 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

  • For every person in the world there are 62 Lego bricks. Author Jonathan Bender realized at the age of 30 he didn’t have a single one and set out to discover why Legos remain so popular with fans young and old.
    Jonathan Bender: Lego, A Love Story
    Thursday, May 13, 2010
    Central Library

    Jonathan Bender discusses his new book Lego: A Love Story, chronicling his time spent researching the colorful and creative world of Legos, on Thursday, May 13, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library 14 W. 10th St.

    For every person in the world, there are 62 Lego bricks. At age 30, Jonathan Bender realized he didn’t have a single one and set out to relive his childhood dream of becoming a Master Model Builder.

  • Art historian Carol Inge Hockett discusses the role of women in ancient Egypt as learned through sculptures, carvings, tomb paintings and other forms of art.
    Carol Hockett: Nefertiti’s Sisters
    Tuesday, May 11, 2010
    Plaza Branch

     Art historian Carol Inge Hockett presents Nefertiti’s Sisters: Women in Ancient Egypt – an examination of the role of women in ancient Egypt as learned through sculptures, carvings, tomb paintings, and other forms of art – on Tuesday, May 11, at 1 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.