Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • National Book Award-winning author Nathaniel Philbrick discusses his new book about the Battle of Little Bighorn.
    Nathaniel Philbrick: The Last Stand
    Monday, May 17, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    National Book Award-winning author Nathaniel Philbrick discusses The Last Stand, his new book about the Battle of Little Bighorn.

    In his narrative, Philbrick sketches the two antagonists, Sitting Bull and George Armstrong Custer, and reminds readers that the Battle of the Little Bighorn was also, even in victory, the last stand for the Sioux and Cheyenne Indian nations. Philbrick evokes the history and geography of the Great Plains with an archetypal story of the American West, which continues to haunt imaginations.

  • Kenneth H. Winn tells the story  of Indian agent George Sibley and Ellen Lorr whose failure to marry touched off a legal and political battle in early 1800s Missouri.
    Kenneth H. Winn: George Sibley and Breach of Promise on the American Frontier
    Sunday, May 16, 2010
    Central Library

    Kenneth H. Winn tells the seldom-heard story of Indian agent George Sibley and Ellen Lorr, whose failure to marry touched off a legal and political battle in early 1800s Missouri, on Sunday, May 16, at 2 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

  • For every person in the world there are 62 Lego bricks. Author Jonathan Bender realized at the age of 30 he didn’t have a single one and set out to discover why Legos remain so popular with fans young and old.
    Jonathan Bender: Lego, A Love Story
    Thursday, May 13, 2010
    Central Library

    Jonathan Bender discusses his new book Lego: A Love Story, chronicling his time spent researching the colorful and creative world of Legos, on Thursday, May 13, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library 14 W. 10th St.

    For every person in the world, there are 62 Lego bricks. At age 30, Jonathan Bender realized he didn’t have a single one and set out to relive his childhood dream of becoming a Master Model Builder.

  • Art historian Carol Inge Hockett discusses the role of women in ancient Egypt as learned through sculptures, carvings, tomb paintings and other forms of art.
    Carol Hockett: Nefertiti’s Sisters
    Tuesday, May 11, 2010
    Plaza Branch

     Art historian Carol Inge Hockett presents Nefertiti’s Sisters: Women in Ancient Egypt – an examination of the role of women in ancient Egypt as learned through sculptures, carvings, tomb paintings, and other forms of art – on Tuesday, May 11, at 1 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

  • In his new biography, Terry Teachout draws on newly available sources, including hundreds of private recordings of backstage and after-hours conversations with Louis Armstrong.
    Terry Teachout: Pops, A Life of Louis Armstrong
    Thursday, May 6, 2010
    Central Library

    Louis Armstrong was among the greatest jazz musicians of the 20th century and a giant of modern American culture, knocking the Beatles off the top of the charts and writing one of the finest jazz autobiographies.

    In Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong, Terry Teachout draws on new sources, including hundreds of private recordings of backstage and after-hours conversations. Teachout is an arts columnist for The Wall Street Journal.

  • Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and bestselling author Anna Quindlen discusses Every Last One, an  unforgettable portrait of a mother, a father, a family, and the explosive, violent consequences of what seem like inconsequential actions.
    Anna Quindlen: Every Last One
    Wednesday, May 5, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and bestselling author Anna Quindlen discusses her book, Every Last One, an unforgettable portrait of a mother, a father, a family, and the explosive, violent consequences of what seem like inconsequential actions.

  • Jerry Muller discusses the  historical relationship between capitalism and the Jewish people and explains why anti-capitalism and anti-Semitism have frequently been linked.
    Jerry Muller: Capitalism and the Jews
    Tuesday, May 4, 2010
    Central Library

    Jerry Muller discusses his new book Capitalism and the Jews, a collection of four essays examining the historical relationship between capitalism and the Jewish people, on Tuesday, May 4, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

    Muller will explain why the Jewish experience with capitalism has been so important and complex, as well as ambivalent.

  • One of the leading Chicano writers in the country with 14 published books in memoir, fiction, nonfiction, children’s literature, and poetry, Luis J. Rodriguez will discuss his body of work.
    An Evening with Luis J. Rodriguez
    Thursday, April 29, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    One of the leading Chicano writers in the country with 14 published books in memoir, fiction, nonfiction, children’s literature, and poetry, Luis J. Rodriguez will discuss his prolific work.

    Rodriguez’s master work, Always Running: La Vida Loca, Gang Days in L.A., is a 1993 memoir of gang life. With more than 300,000 copies sold, this book garnered a Carl Sandburg Literary Award, a Chicago Sun-Times Book Award, and was designated a New York Times Notable Book.

  • The co-founder of the Knowledge Is Power Program Schools examines the effectiveness of ideas such as longer school days, summer classes, and a more strenuous academic curriculum.
    Mike Feinberg: Going Beyond Z
    Wednesday, April 28, 2010
    Central Library

    Mike Feinberg, co-founder of the Knowledge Is Power Program Schools, discusses an examination of KIPP-endorsed ideas such as longer school days, summer classes, and a more strenuous academic curriculum.

  • A native of the American Midwest, Juliet Gael presents her novel, a mix of fact and fiction that captures the passions, hopes, dreams, and sorrows of literature’s most famous sisters.
    Juliet Gael: Romancing Miss Brontë
    Tuesday, April 27, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    A native of the American Midwest, Juliet Gael presents her novel, a mix of fact and fiction that captures the passions, hopes, dreams, and sorrows of literature’s most famous sisters.