Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter. Please allow 7-10 days for the recording to be posted.

  • Library Director Crosby Kemper III hosts a conversation on humanities studies and the future of America’s place in the world with Librarian of Congress James H. Billington and Princeton University engineering professor David Billington.
    Monitoring the Humanistic Heartbeat Of America
    Thursday, January 21, 2010
    Central Library

     Kansas City Public Library Director Crosby Kemper III hosts a conversation about humanities studies and the future of America's position in the world with brothers James H. and David Billington on Thursday, January 21, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library.

    James Billington, the librarian of Congress, will discuss why the decline of humanities studies has diminished America's position in the world.

  • Author and former Kansas City resident Gretchen Rubin discusses her new book The Happiness Project, which chronicles the year she spent trying to live a happier, more fulfilling life.
    Gretchen Rubin: The Happiness Project
    Wednesday, January 20, 2010
    Plaza Branch

    Author Gretchen Rubin discusses her new book The Happiness Project: Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun on Wednesday, January 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

  • Author Michael Gates Gill  demonstrates that it is possible  to make a leap to a better life at any point, regardless of your age, career path, or family situation.
    Michael Gates Gill: How to Save Your Own Life
    Tuesday, January 19, 2010
    Plaza Branch

     Bestselling author Michael Gates Gill discusses his new book How to Save Your Own Life: 15 Lessons on Finding Hope in Unexpected Places on Tuesday, January 19, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

  • Twyla Dell discusses the rapid rise of Kansas City in its first 100 years and the role that energy played in its development.
    Twyla Dell: Flame, Furnace, Fuel - Creating Kansas City
    Sunday, January 17, 2010
    Central Library

    Twyla Dell discusses the rapid rise of Kansas City in its first 100 years and the role that energy played in its development on Sunday, January 17, at 2 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

    The site that would become Kansas City was founded in the Wood Age as the steamboat era began, grew to a major railroad junction 50 years later in the Coal Age and expanded into the Oil Age in the early 1900s.

  • Economist Tyler Cowen, one of the most respected behavioral economists in the world, offers an essential guide to success in a radically new hyper-networked age.
    Tyler Cowen: Create Your Own Economy
    Thursday, January 14, 2010
    Central Library

    Economist Tyler Cowen discusses his new book Create Your Own Economy: The Path to Prosperity in a Disordered World on Thursday, January 14, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

  • Jacqueline Edelberg chronicles  the transformation of Chicago’s Louis Nettelhorst Elementary School from an underutilized and struggling neighborhood institution  into a successful, vibrant pillar of the community.
    Jacqueline Edelberg: How To Walk To School
    Wednesday, January 13, 2010
    Central Library

    To open the latest season of the What Works in Urban Education series, Tom Bloch and the University Academy present Jacqueline Edelberg and her book, How to Walk to School: Blueprint for a Neighborhood School Renaissance on Wednesday, January 13, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

  • Urban League of Greater Kansas City President & CEO Gwen Grant presents the State of Black Kansas City 2010 Equality Index.  Following the presentation, historian Bryan LeBeau answers the question What Would Abraham Lincoln Think?
    The State of Black Kansas City/What Would Lincoln Think?
    Tuesday, January 12, 2010
    Central Library

    Urban League of Greater Kansas City President Gwendolyn Grant leads a discussion of data from the State of Black Kansas City 2010 Equality Index on Tuesday, January 12, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

    The 2010 Index indicates that black unemployment is three times that of whites, that more than three times as many blacks as whites live below poverty line, and that more than 50% of blacks do not have medical insurance.

  • Lee Lamar recounts his wartime experiences and return to Croatia, where he crash landed during a World War II bombing run.
    Lee Lamar and Dennis Okerstrom: Final Mission
    Wednesday, November 18, 2009
    Central Library

    Piloting a bomber nicknamed "Bottoms Up" during WWII, Lee Lamar was shot down over northern Italy on this day 65 years ago. Hit not once but twice, the plane veered out of control and crashed in Croatia. Lamar was the last crewman to parachute away, landing in the hands of German soldiers, who sent him to a POW camp for the final six months of the war.

    In 2007, Lamar returned to Croatia to visit the site of his bailout and capture, upon invitation of a Croatian archaeological team that had recovered the remains of "Bottoms Up."

  • The Library’s Presidential Series continues when Robert W. Merry discusses his new book about  James K. Polk - one of America’s most controversial, and arguably most successful, presidents.
    Robert W. Merry: A Country of Vast Designs
    Tuesday, November 17, 2009
    Central Library
    Recommended reading:
    Staff Picks: James K. Polk & the Mexican War

    The Library’s Presidential Series continues when Robert W. Merry discusses his new book about James K. Polk, one of the most controversial—and arguably one of America’s most successful single-term—presidents.

  • Carlotta Walls LaNier made history 52 years ago as one of The Little Rock Nine. After years of silence, Lanier shares her story for the first time with her new book.
    Carlotta Walls LaNier: A Mighty Long Way
    Monday, November 16, 2009
    Central Library
    Recommended reading:
    Staff Picks: The Little Rock Nine: Everyday Heroes of Civil Rights

    Carlotta Walls LaNier made history 52 years ago as one of "The Little Rock Nine." After years of silence, LaNier shares her story for the first time with her book A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High School.

    On September 25, 1957, LaNier and eight other students only wanted to make it to class. Descended from a line of proud black landowners and businessmen, LaNier was raised to believe that education was the key to success and she excelled in her studies at segregated schools throughout the 1950s. With Brown v. Board of Education erasing the classroom color divide, the teenager volunteered to be among the first black students—of whom she was the youngest—to integrate Central High School.