Event Audio

To listen to an audio recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The audio file will launch the media player on your computer.

The most recent recording displays at the top. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter.

  • Dowling College historian Yanek Mieczkowski, the author of Eisenhower's Sputnik Moment: The Race for Space and World Prestige, discusses Ike’s calm, effective response to the Soviet Union’s inauguration of the Space Age in 1957.
    Understanding Ike: Four Key Eisenhower Traits and Their Role in the Space Race - Yanek Mieczkowski
    Thursday, September 17, 2015
    Central Library

    The Soviet Union’s 1957 launch of Sputnik, the world’s first satellite, was a critical Cold War moment for Dwight D. Eisenhower. What he called “a small ball” became a source of Soviet pride and propaganda and wounded him politically as critics charged the American president with responding sluggishly to the challenge of space exploration.

    Dowling College historian Yanek Mieczkowski, the author of Eisenhower's Sputnik Moment: The Race for Space and World Prestige, argues otherwise. Eisenhower stayed calm and moved effectively in guiding the U.S. into the Space Age.

  • Kicking off a two-month, citywide celebration of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Mark Burstein – former president of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America – discusses the impact that Carroll’s story and characters have had on literary and popular culture.
    What Is It About Alice? - Mark Burstein
    Wednesday, September 16, 2015
    Central Library

    Few literary works are more quoted, translated, and adapted than Lewis Carroll’s Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. This year marks the sesquicentennial of the 1865 publication of the tale of a young girl who falls through a rabbit hole into a world full of curious characters.

    Kicking off a two-month, citywide celebration of the book, Mark Burstein—former president of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America—discusses the impact that Carroll’s story and characters have had on literary and popular culture.

  • On the 10th anniversary of the publication of his seminal, Kansas City-based novel, UMKC’s Whitney Terrell joins a discussion of its themes of prejudice, greed, and segregation. How much has the city’s racial climate changed in the past decade?
    The King of Kings County
    Wednesday, September 9, 2015
    Central Library

    Whitney Terrell’s novel, The King of Kings County, remains a landmark examination of white flight and the manipulative, prejudice-laced real estate practices that helped to segregate Kansas City. Selected as a best book of 2005 by the Christian Science Monitor, its inquiry into the economic roots of racial inequality feels even more current today.

    On the 10th anniversary of its publication, Terrell—assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Missouri-Kansas City—revisits the issues he explored in the book. Has the city’s racial climate changed in the past decade? If so, how? If not, why? Joining the discussion are Gwen Grant, president and CEO of the Urban League of Kansas City and new Black Archives of Mid-America Manager Emiel Cleaver. Gina Kaufmann, the host of KCUR-FM’s Central Standard, moderates.

  • KCPT-TV’s Nick Haines emcees an event spotlighting participants in Literacy Kansas City’s adult- learning program, who tell their stories. Kansas City Star columnist Jenee Osterheldt and playwright Frank Higgins also discuss what writing has brought to their lives.
    The Power of Reading and Writing
    Tuesday, September 8, 2015
    Plaza Branch

    An estimated 225,000 adults in Kansas City function at the lowest literacy level, denied some of the simplest and most important moments in life because they cannot read.

    The nonprofit organization Literacy Kansas City targets that issue through tutoring and other direct services, advocacy, and collaboration. Its seventh annual event at the Library, The Power of Reading and Writing, emceed by KCPT-TV’s Nick Haines, commemorates the effort and the adult learners benefitting from it. A number of them share their stories. Kansas City Star columnist Jenee Osterheldt and playwright Frank Higgins also discuss what writing has brought to their lives.

    Co-presented by Literacy Kansas City and The Writers Place. Co-sponsored by the Friends of the Kansas City Public Library.

  • Colby and Megan Garrelts, the award-winning chef- owners of Bluestem in Kansas City and Rye in Leawood, discuss some of the 50 handcrafted recipes included in their new book, Made in America.
    Made in America: A Modern Collection of Classic Recipes - Colby & Megan Garrelts
    Thursday, August 27, 2015
    Plaza Branch

    Award-winning chefs Colby and Megan Garrelts discuss some of the 50 handcrafted recipes included in their new book, Made in America.

    These recipes—American classics redefined by easy, chef inspired techniques, quality ingredients, and a love for regional flavors from their Midwestern roots—will soon be the classics you refer to again and again for true Americana cooking. Made in America features recipes sorted by the cooking methods commonly used in American kitchens from daybreak to the bakeshop. Many recipes begin with a childhood memory from Colby or Megan that describes the roots and the journey of each recipe.

    The Garrelts are chef-owners of Bluestem in Kansas City and Rye in Leawood.

    Co-presented by Andrews McMeel Universal.

  • Author Cynthia Bond joins Library Director of Readers’ Services Kaite Stover in a discussion of Bond’s acclaimed first book, a contemporary African American novel about a man determined to protect the woman he loves from a town desperate to destroy her.
    Ruby - Cynthia Bond
    Tuesday, August 25, 2015
    Central Library

    Author Cynthia Bond is joined by the Library’s Director of Readers’ Services Kaite Stover for a discussion of Bond’s debut novel which chronicles the story of a man determined to protect the woman he loves from a town desperate to destroy her.

    Ephram Jennings has never forgotten the girl with the long braids running through the piney woods of Liberty, their small East Texas town. Young Ruby Bell has suffered beyond imagining, so as soon as she can, she flees suffocating Liberty for the bright pull of 1950s New York; but when a telegram from her cousin forces her to return home, thirty-year-old Ruby finds herself reliving the devastating violence of her girlhood.

  • Best-selling author and former Kansas City Star columnist Joe Posnanski discusses his new book about the most remarkable rivalry and (eventual) friendship in modern golf – between Jack Nicklaus and KC-area icon Tom Watson.
    The Secret of Golf: The Story of Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus
    Wednesday, August 19, 2015
    Plaza Branch

    Bestselling author and former Kansas City Star columnist Joe Posnanski discusses his new book about the most remarkable rivalry and (eventual) friendship in modern golf.

    The first time they met, at an exhibition match in 1967, Tom Watson was a 17-year-old high school student and Jack Nicklaus, at 27, was already the greatest golfer in the world. Tom revered Jack. Jack barely knew who Tom was. But over the next 20 years they battled again and again for championships, a place at the top of the sport, and the title of greatest living golfer.

  • Donald Scott discusses his new memoir, which traces the rise of a poor black youth from Hunnewell, Missouri, to leadership as an Army brigadier general, founding director of Americorps, and ultimately chief operating officer of the Library of Congress.
    Recipient of Grace - Donald L. Scott
    Thursday, August 13, 2015
    Central Library

    Former Library of Congress Chief Executive Officer Donald Scott discusses his new memoir Recipient of Grace.

    Scott’s story begins as a poor black youth growing up in Hunnewell, Missouri, and concludes with his term as chief operating officer at the Library of Congress. In between, he recounts his service in the U.S. Army and the undercurrent of racial tensions.

  • Author Pete Dulin joins the Library’s director of programming and marketing, Steven Woolfolk, and representatives of local breweries Torn Label and Big Rip in a discussion of the burgeoning local beer scene and Dulin’s book KC Ale Trail.
    KC Ale Trail - Pete Dulin
    Tuesday, August 11, 2015
    Central Library

    Author Pete Dulin is joined by the Library’s director of programming and marketing Steven Woolfolk, and representatives from local breweries Torn Label and Big Rip for a discussion of the local beer scene and Dulin’s book KC Ale Trail.

    KC Ale Trail offers a guide to 23 modern breweries and examines the growth of craft brewing in Kansas City and the surrounding area. Dulin also includes interviews with some of the area’s leading craft beer advocates, including Boulevard Creative Director Payton Kelly and Bier Station owner John Couture.

    The event is preceded by a reception featuring samples provided by Torn Label and Big Rip.

  • In a discussion of his new book, Jack Cashill documents what he calls an unfortunate mutation in America's liberal tradition, namely the unholy rise of neo-puritanism. Its adherents show less interest in celebrating the many colors of the multicultural rainbow than they do in condemning those who resist the celebration.
    Scarlet Letters: The Ever Increasing Intolerance of the Cult of Liberalism
    Thursday, July 30, 2015
    Central Library

    Author Jack Cashill discusses his new book, Scarlet Letters: The Ever Increasing Intolerance of the Cult of Liberalism and documents what he calls an unfortunate mutation in America's liberal tradition, namely the unholy rise of neo-puritanism.

    Cashill argues that progressive neo-puritans show less interest in celebrating the many colors of the multicultural rainbow than they do in condemning those who resist the celebration. The accusers insist, he says, that resistance is born out of hatred – of blacks, of gays, of immigrants, of Muslims, of women, of poor people, even, yes, of mother earth. “Hate” stands as the umbrella sin for all dissenters.

Kansas City Public Library Beta