Tuesday, September 26, 2017 is National Voter Registration Day and all of our Kansas City Public Library locations are ready to register you to vote.
The Library can be a valuable resource for artists as they develop their projects.  For instance, a handful of this year's Art in the Loop creators used the services of the Missouri Valley Special Collections to conduct research.
 
September is Library Card Sign-up Month, and the Kansas City Public Library is celebrating and hopefully inspiring by having staff rifle through their wallets and closets to find the earliest library cards they own. 
 
During fall 2017, the Kansas City area's six public library systems join together for a community-wide reading and discussion of Tim O'Brien's seminal work about the Vietnam War, The Things They Carried. The local edition of the 2017 NEA Big Read KC offers programs exploring veterans' war experiences, music of the period, Hollywood's handling of the war, comparisons of 1960s protests with present-day movements, writing about war, civil rights, and the era's cultural and political legacy.

During fall 2017, the Kansas City area's six public library systems join together for a community-wide reading and discussion of Tim O'Brien's seminal work about the Vietnam War, The Things They Carried. The local edition of the 2017 NEA Big Read KC offers programs exploring veterans' war experiences, music of the period, Hollywood's handling of the war, comparisons of 1960s protests with present-day movements, writing about war, civil rights, and the era's cultural and political legacy.
 

After about a month of being closed for renovations, the Library’s Southeast Branch will reopen to the public on Tuesday, September 5.

We DON'T Have Eclipse Glasses, But …
You may have heard on TV, radio, or online that “your local library has eclipse glasses free for the public.” That’s not entirely accurate. Not ALL local libraries have the glasses. Here’s why:

 
Wanting to photograph the upcoming solar eclipse with your smart phone? Do it with care, professional photographer Reed Hoffmann says.
 
FYI Book Group: All the Single Ladies
Writer Rebecca Traister’s fascinating social history All the Single Ladies explores the impact unmarried women have had on American culture throughout the ages, turning their energies toward political movements, social change, the economy, and more. The Kansas City Public Library recently organized an FYI Book Group conversation about the book and its themes of cultural progress, gender and race, political power, the workplace, personal relationships, and contemporary women's issues. 
 
On July 18, 2017, the heads of four KC-area library systems – Johnson County’s Sean Casserly, KCK’s Carol Levers, Mid-Continent’s Steve Potter, and KCPL’s Crosby Kemper III – joined KCPT’s Nick Haines for a public conversation at the Plaza Branch about Libraries Out Loud, a documentary series celebrating the work of our local libraries. Produced by filmmaker and documentarian Michael Price for KCPT’s Flatland website, the film series touches on ways today’s libraries fulfill their traditional missions while also serving our communities in innovative and vital ways.
 
The children’s book What the Dinosaurs Did Last Night became hugely popular after its 2014 publication. It features photographs of dinosaur toys caught in the middle of making messes in different rooms around the house.
Kansas City Councilman Quinton Lucas speaks at a recent event at a recent event at which the city and the Library were presented a 2017 LibraryAware Community Award.

Kansas City Councilman Quinton Lucas offered a moving tribute to libraries in general, and the Kansas City Public Library in particular, at a recent event at which the city and the Library were presented a 2017 LibraryAware Community Award. 

Eugene O’Neill’s first professionally produced play, a one-act play entitled “Bound East for Cardiff,” premiered in 1916, first at the small Provincetown (MA) playhouse, then in New York.  The play has personal significance for me as it was my introduction to O’Neill, back in the sophomore year of high school.  Following that introduction, I went on something of an O’Neill binge, reading a large portion of O’Neill’s oeuvre, starting with his four “Glencairn” plays.  Following “Bound East,” O’Neill wrote three more one-act plays (“The Moon of the Carribees,” “In the Zone,” and “Long Voyage Home”) about the crew of the Glencairn, a merchant ship operating in the Atlantic during WWI. 
Past and present are spelled out in a series of painstakingly researched interpretive panels recently installed along the Central Library’s rooftop perimeter. Collectively titled “What Surrounds Us: Reading the Past and Present,” they weave more than a century and a half of Kansas City history into narratives and accompanying illustrations.
The Kansas City Public Library is teaming up with our sister institutions across the area and the hometown Royals for Library Night at the K on Thursday, August 3.

I'm not sure I've ever had a novel recommended to me more highly, more insistently, by more people, than The Force by Don Winslow.

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