KC Public Library Blog

Exodusters Mark the Spot

"Negro Exodusters en route to Kansas, fleeing from the yellow fever, " Photomural from engraving. Harpers Weekly, 1870. Historic American Building Survey Field Records, HABS FN-6, #KS -49-11 Prints and Photographs Division (106)

April 25, 1879: The Wyandotte Commercial Gazette reports that more than 1,000 destitute people have arrived in Wyandotte City, most of them freed slaves drawn by Kansas' reputation as a free state.

Time Travel

Wormhole

Apparently, one of the big trends in new young adult books coming out is time travel. That pesky fourth dimension that has us trapped right now isn’t going to stop authors. Imaginations aren’t bound by reality. So, characters hurtle though time and face the different triumphs and challenges of another era.

No words? No problem!

Float by Daniel Miyares

Talk. Sing. Read. Write. Play. These words aren’t just on the walls of our libraries because they look cool in bubble letters. The American Library Association’s Every Child Ready to Read initiative came up with these benchmarks based on feedback from previous research they had done. When caregivers talk, sing, read, write, and play with their little ones, they are preparing them to be future readers.

A Beer Baron Is Born

George Muehlebach, source unknown. Image courtesy vintagekansascity.com

April 24, 1833: George Muehlebach, who will develop his brewery at 18th and Main into one of the most successful businesses in Kansas City, is born in Argau, Switzerland.

To Promote the General Welfare

William Volker

April 14, 1910: The City Council passes an ordinance drafted by the shy philanthropist, William Volker, which creates the nation’s first Board of Public Welfare.

Book Review - Front Lines

Cover Image

Front Lines by Michael Grant

publication date: 2016
pages: 544
ISBN: 978-0-06-234215-7

Coming Up

Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America

Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America by Jill Leovy is featured as May's FYI Book Group selection.

And Then It Happened

Swope Park Swimming Pool

April 9, 1968: With tensions high after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., riots break out in Kansas City, leaving seven people dead and nearly 100 buildings damaged.

Wrong Way Corrigan

Bernard Corrigan

March 31, 1882: In an editorial, The Kansas City Star supports a new streetcar company and argues against a monopoly held on Kansas City transportation by Thomas Corrigan.

Go Girl! Essential sports reading for girls and their families.

As Women’s History Month comes to a close and the Spring sports season ramps up on the court and field, I thought it might be fun to find books, fiction and nonfiction alike, that tell the stories of women and girls in athletics. From the true story of 1940’s Rollerderby rough-housers featured in Sue Macy’s Rollerderby Rivals to the critically acclaimed graphic novel Rollergirl tracking one young girl’s tumultuous introduction into contact skating at summer camp, these stories are bound to inspire and inform.

FICTION

Death Takes a Holiday (Maybe)

Postcard of Woodward Hall at Park College

March 27, 1836: George S. Park, who will go on to found Parkville, Missouri, and what has become Park University, purportedly survives a Mexican firing squad during the fight for Texan independence by pretending to be dead.

Local History

Wide Open Town Symposium: Kansas City during the Pendergast Era

The Library, UMKC, and 18 local and national historians partner to explore Kansas City’s vibrant history of the 1920s and ’30s in a public symposium, April 1-2.

Book Reviews

Book Review: Shakespeare by Mark van Doren

Mark van Doren’s Shakespeare is a sensitive, enthusiastic, and insightful collection of short essays on Shakespeare’s plays and his poetry first published in 1939.

Book Review - We Are the Ants

Cover Image

We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson

publication date: 2016
pages: 451
ISBN: 978-1-4814-4963-2

A Man of Many Parts

Lafayette Tillman

March 15, 1858: Lafayette Tillman, who will go on to become a veteran of the Spanish-American War and one of Kansas City's first African American police officers, is born in Evansville, Indiana.

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