It’s one of the most important decisions we make when it comes to our kids: where they will go to school. In some cities and towns, it’s all about the neighborhood. In smaller communities, there might be a single school for all the kids to attend. Here in Kansas City, there are dozens of options for families and caregivers, and let’s face it, they can be overwhelming. That’s why Show Me KC Schools, the Office of the Mayor Sly James, and the Kansas City Public Library are co-sponsoring the City School Fair.
Halloween is the time of year when many of us think about what really scares us. To get you into the Halloween spirit, our staff highlights books or resources or digital services that gave us major heebie-jeebies or just have a great Halloween theme in them.

In the future, mankind has avoided self-destruction by a hair's breadth. Organized religions have been outlawed. Ultrafast transportation has rendered geographical nations irrelevant. Society has been rebuilt according to the ideals of 18th century Enlightenment philosophy. The world's most notorious criminal—serving a sentence in service to any who command—and a sensayer (a spiritual therapist and guide) discover a child who can perform miracles, with the power to irrevocably change the nature of reality itself. And a brazen theft threatens to expose secrets that could topple the world's greatest powers.

Too Like the Lightning by Ada Palmer is a near perfect blend of science fiction and philosophy.

During a special five-day event in partnership with Brian Frehner, a tenured professor of science, technology, and society at University of Missouri–Kansas City, the Kansas City Public Library offers free classes and drop-in sessions to help you with your smartphone, technology repair, and even prepare you for a job interview.

During a special five-day event in partnership with Brian Frehner, a tenured professor of science, technology, and society at University of Missouri–Kansas City, the Kansas City Public Library offers free classes and drop-in sessions to help you with your smartphone, technology repair, and even prepare you for a job interview.

Main Street History Crawl
The Kansas City Public Library, National World War I Museum and Memorial, and Kansas City Museum offered a unique glimpse into our city’s past by organizing a “history crawl” walking tour along a portion of the Main Street corridor downtown. The approximately two-mile tour, led by preservation consultant and architectural historian Cydney Millstein, began at the Central Library near 10th and Main, and wrapped up at the Liberty Memorial at the National World War I Museum.
 

Everyone from our frontline librarians to Director Crosby Kemper III takes pride in the often cutting-edge services offered by the Library, in our efforts to help chart a course for 21st-century libraries nationwide.

The Kansas City Public Library is considering a new program to enhance and extend the benefits of having a library card and would like to determine the level of public interest in this type of program. 
The 2017 Veterans Writing Workshop is designed to help veterans and their families develop the writing and narrative skills that can empower them to tell their stories, whether they be true-life accounts or wholly original tales. The workshop is free and open to past or present military members and family members of veterans. Each of the four-hour sessions is conducted by professional writers and educators; they provide the same high level of instruction as a college or university writing course.
The 2017 Veterans Writing Workshop is designed to help veterans and their families develop the writing and narrative skills that can empower them to tell their stories, whether they be true-life accounts or wholly original tales. The workshop is free and open to past or present military members and family members of veterans. Each of the four-hour sessions is conducted by professional writers and educators; they provide the same high level of instruction as a college or university writing course.
 
Tuesday, September 26, 2017 is National Voter Registration Day and all of our Kansas City Public Library locations are ready to register you to vote.
 
The Library can be a valuable resource for artists as they develop their projects.  For instance, a handful of this year's Art in the Loop creators used the services of the Missouri Valley Special Collections to conduct research.
 
September is Library Card Sign-up Month, and the Kansas City Public Library is celebrating and hopefully inspiring by having staff rifle through their wallets and closets to find the earliest library cards they own. 
 
During fall 2017, the Kansas City area's six public library systems join together for a community-wide reading and discussion of Tim O'Brien's seminal work about the Vietnam War, The Things They Carried. The local edition of the 2017 NEA Big Read KC offers programs exploring veterans' war experiences, music of the period, Hollywood's handling of the war, comparisons of 1960s protests with present-day movements, writing about war, civil rights, and the era's cultural and political legacy.

During fall 2017, the Kansas City area's six public library systems join together for a community-wide reading and discussion of Tim O'Brien's seminal work about the Vietnam War, The Things They Carried. The local edition of the 2017 NEA Big Read KC offers programs exploring veterans' war experiences, music of the period, Hollywood's handling of the war, comparisons of 1960s protests with present-day movements, writing about war, civil rights, and the era's cultural and political legacy.

After about a month of being closed for renovations, the Library’s Southeast Branch will reopen to the public on Tuesday, September 5.

We DON'T Have Eclipse Glasses, But …
You may have heard on TV, radio, or online that “your local library has eclipse glasses free for the public.” That’s not entirely accurate. Not ALL local libraries have the glasses. Here’s why:

 
Wanting to photograph the upcoming solar eclipse with your smart phone? Do it with care, professional photographer Reed Hoffmann says.
 

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