07-Ghost

07-Ghost by Yukino Ichihara, Yuki Amemiya

Teen Reviewer: Erica Whorton

Teito Klein was once an orphan and a slave. All he has ever known was to obey orders that were given to him and to never betray the military. Not having a full grasp of his memories was fine with him until he meets the person responsible for his capture.

Escaping from the military, and on the run, Teito ends up in the church district where he meets three priests who bring him to the church where he is safe for a while. Teito eventually decides to become a priest and sets off on a journey with one of the three priests to discover the truth of his past and the truth of the Barsburg Empire's past.

I love this manga series. It is action packed with twists and turns that are unexpected and expected. The art is compelling. The only problem I have is that sometimes the art has too much action that makes it difficult to tell what is going on. All in all it is a good series and I highly recommend it to teens who love action packed mangas.

Allegiant by Veronica Roth

Allegiant by Veronica Roth

Teen Reviewer: Keely McLouth

Mysterious and painfully beautiful, this ending to the Divergent trilogy left me in tears, wishing there was more to soak up. A cross of romance, struggle, and war, the dystopian society feels real to the bones.

With a shocking ending, my heart sky-rocketed with thousands of emotions. Through this story with Tris and Four, I have bitten my nails down from the suspense. With hundreds of copies sold, this tale of true love and the reality behind "Perfection and Equality" will be in the hands of dreamers everywhere. This story teaches to find your way and fight for what you love. With Tris' loyalty and Four's love for Tris, will they make it to the end or will the pain of loss drive them apart? As Tris gets desperate for answers, how far will she go before Four can't save her? How far will she drive herself just for her loved ones to be safe? Intense and heart-pounding, Veronica Roth has gone all-out to give her readers an experience they will never forget.

National Medal for Museum and Library Service

Call us America’s library capital – or at least, one of them. The Mid-Continent Public Library has been named a recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service.

Weasels by Elys Dolan

If you fill Dr. Evil’s lair with a slew of Alvin and the Chipmunks wannabes, you end up with Weasels by Elys Dolan.

When the weasels’ quest to take over the world is unexpectedly thwarted, chaos ensues. Is the outcome world domination? Only reading will tell, but who doesn’t like a way to explain “megalomania” to their first grader?

I read books with my daughter nightly. I read one book to her, and she reads one to me. Usually we share a different book each night. Yet, by request, we have re-read Weasels four times. We both lead parts of it. The weasels’ distinct personalities give us a chance to employ a variety of squeaky voices.

My daughter’s review: “It is funny.” Her favorite part is when the Safety and Security weasel attempts to confiscate another weasel’s drill. That weasel runs away shouting, “Without my drill, I am nothing!”

My review: “The witty wording and situations make this an appealing read for kids and their grown-ups alike.” If she chooses this book a fifth time, I will have no complaints.

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry

It’s been a long time since I took my time reading a book because I didn’t want it to end. The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry is one such book.

With a world of unique individuals and experiences, it’s great to know that we can always explore and depend upon a variety of creative stories to reflect real world situations and garner different perspectives. Here are three great books about uniqueness, differences, and expressing your individuality.

Henny
By Elizabeth Rose Stanton

Now, I know what you’re thinking, "that chicken has arms!"
Henny is a tale about a chicken born with human arms. Henny notices right away that she isn’t exactly like other chickens. Sometimes Henny loves her arms, sometimes not so much. Henny tries to seem normal and stay positive, but it’s hard ignoring the laughs of the other animals. Through chance, Henny’s arms turn out to be incredibly helpful! Henny soon realizes that her arms are great and can do many awesome things. Get past the idea of human arms on a chicken, and you’ve got a wonderful story for anyone who has ever felt a little out of place. A useful tool for a child learning to figure out the things they are good at, with the self they have been given.

Health and Wellness Center

One by one on Tuesday, April 22, 2014, some 60 people of varying size, shape, and age will step atop a scale at the L.H. Bluford Branch to measure the returns from 12 weeks of sweat and self-discipline.

Jonathan Swift: His Life and His World

Columbia University released the roll of 2014 Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists this week, and one name — Leo Damrosch — caught our eye. He’s speaking at the Library next month.

Extraordinary Warren by Sarah Dillard

We've all wondered what it would be like to be a superhero! To fly, have super strength, or weather extreme obstacles is an idea usually left for the dream space. We all can't be Spider-Man, but below are some great books that emphasize the superhero that can be found in all of us!

Extraordinary Warren: A Super Chicken
By Sarah Dillard

Extraordinary Warren: A Super Chicken is about a young, ordinary, run of the mill chicken. But Warren wants to be more than ordinary, he wants to be extraordinary! Warren doesn’t want to just peep and eat chicken feed all day long; he wants to mix it up a little bit. Warren wants to be a superhero, Chicken Supreme, with his trusty sidekick Egg by his side. All the other chickens laugh at Warren’s attempt to fly and be more than your average chicken. Warren may not have super powers, but when a conniving rat shows up to trick Warren and the other chicks into being the main course at his barbeque, Warren and Egg have to show that they are more than just a chicken and egg. Extraordinary Warren: A Super Chicken, is a fun story about finding the extraordinary in us all, even if at times we may feel a little ordinary.

Oedipus Rex

I know what you must be thinking – how does Greek tragedy fit into my ongoing blog series about classic mysteries? Well, I admit, it’s something of a stretch, but April is National Poetry Month, and I strongly advise readers to find some great poetry out there.

April is National Poetry Month, but here's a way to enjoy poetry year-round. Collections of poetry, entire stories told through poems, books about the impact of poetry on teen lives - there is something for everyone. Try one or several of the books below. Who knows? Maybe you’ll be inspired to write your own poem.

Click here to check out poems by other Kansas City teens.

Books of Poetry

Call number area: 811

Falling Hard: 100 love poems by teenagers edited by Betsy Franco

How I Discovered Poetry by Marilyn Nelson/ illustrated by Hadley Hooper

A Wrinkle in Time

We have a winner!

Our 2014 Booketology Champion is: A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle!

Did you know that in addition to all of the FREE resources to help you learn provided by the Kansas City Public Library, there are also some amazing free resources online? Check out all of these websites!

Coursera.org – Here you can take the same courses that they are taking at the top universities in the country for FREE!

Ted.com - Watch these inspirational videos highlighting great ideas that you should know about.

A Wrinkle in Time or Little Women?


And then there were two! The Final 4 round of Booketology is complete, and our winning books now move on to the Championship.

Check out the voting results
from this last round.

Little Women

Our Spring Tournament of Books has returned for the third year! Check out the results of the Elite 8, and vote in the Final 4 of Booketology, where it's book vs. book and you decide the winner!

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