KC Public Library Blog

Drawn from the Heartland

Postcard of self-portrait of Thomas Hart Benton, painted by the artist in 1970

April 15, 1889: Thomas Hart Benton, a painter who will go on to lead the regionalist movement in American art in the 1930s from his studio in Kansas City, is born in Neosho, Missouri.

Library Life

Bareknuckle Books

Which author would win in a (literary) fight? That’s the question you get to help answer during BAREKNUCKLE BOOKS, our Author Cage Match - “Paperweight” Division.

Poems For Tiny People and The Grown-Ups Who Love Them

Silver Moon: Lullabies and Cradle Songs by Jack Perlutsky and illustrated by Jui Ishida

Poetry does not need to be lofty. It does not need to be revolutionary. It does not need to rhyme or follow a particular form. It can do all of these things, but it doesn’t have to. When we celebrate National Poetry Month every April, sometimes we forget that it is for all ages. That’s right; even tiny babies can enjoy poems.

Poetry: Your Pen is Mightier

Indivisible: Poems for Social Justice

What do you believe in? What do you stand for? Sometimes, unfairness in the world can make you feel like you are going to explode. At the same time, you can feel helpless. Absolutely powerless. But you aren’t. Your words can awaken. They can embolden. They can ignite.

Library Life

With $100,000 Grant, Library to Launch Financial Literacy Program

The Kansas City Public Library has received a $100,000 grant to help launch a new, two-year program aimed at improving financial literacy.

Book Reviews

The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry

Some of the poets associated with World War I are among the greatest of the 20th century: Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Edmund Blunden, Isaac Rosenberg, to name a few.

Bottoms Up

Postcard of the old Union depot at Union Avenue and Santa Fe Street

April 7, 1878: Union Depot, Kansas City's first large train station, opens in the West Bottoms after $410,028 in construction costs.

Teens have the power to Save MO Libraries!

People from all over Missouri met at the State Capital to ask Governor Nixon to release the $6 million he is withholding in state aid to libraries. Two busloads of teens from Kansas City led the protest and sent powerful message to their state legislators!

Wrong Way Corrigan

Bernard Corrigan

March 31, 1882: In an editorial, The Kansas City Star supports a new streetcar company and argues against a monopoly held on Kansas City transportation by Thomas Corrigan.

Book Reviews

Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free by Cory Doctorow

Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age

Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age by Cory Doctorow is, as one would expect, an incisive and lively exploration of the issues surrounding copyright and enforcement in the Internet Age.

Secrets of Chambers

Annie Chambers

March 24, 1935: Annie Chambers, who owned a 25-room house of prostitution in Kansas City, dies at the age of 92. By the time of her death, Chambers' own life had neatly paralleled Kansas City's untamed years of the late nineteenth century.

Local History

Rivers, Roads, and Railways: Catalyst for Development

Sitting at the confluence of two rivers near the edge of the western frontier, the area we know today as Kansas City seemed destined to become a major transportation hub between the East and West.

Camp Fire's Absolutely Incredible Kid Day

Camp Fire's Absolutely Incredible Kid Day

Kids are amazing! They all bring something unique and interesting to the world. We wouldn't be able to see things the way that we do without the perspective that they provide.

A Man of Many Parts

Lafayette Tillman

March 15, 1858: Lafayette Tillman, who will go on to become a veteran of the Spanish-American War and one of Kansas City's first African American police officers, is born in Evansville, Indiana.

Book Reviews

Tarzan the Untamed by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Tarzan the Untamed

This novel is quite unique in the Tarzan canon as it is the only one that makes reference to the Great War. The novel, though written in 1919 and published in book form in 1920, is set in 1914.