KC Public Library Blog

Program Notes: Baby Boom (1987)

Baby Boom movie poster

Diane Keaton's greatest performance? I'd like to make the case that the role that most perfectly dovetails with her actorish sensibilities is that of J.C. Wiatt in 1987's Baby Boom.

Library Life

Food For Fines Recipe Contest Winner Announced

Last November 7-13 was Food For Fines week at the Kansas City Public Library, and our food bins truly overran with donations to Harvesters: The Community Food Network. But while anyone could bring in food to reduce their late fees, only one person could win our recipe contest.

Book Reviews

The Amish Midwife by Mindy Starns Clark and Leslie Gould

The Amish Midwife book cover

Mindy Starns Clark and Leslie Gould's new inspirational novel, The Amish Midwife, is about a search for one's identity and a place to belong. Depicting little-known America’s subculture with a unique outlook, this fiction combines adventure and mystery with a hint of romance.

Library Life

What Can Google Fiber Do For You? Get the Full Gigabit City Results

Gigabit City report

Imagine it’s 75 years from now. Your grandson brings his son into Union Station. Before them stands a moving, smiling, talking, 3-D image of you and your son visiting the Station 50 years ago.

Guess the Movie!

Movies posters are iconic images that frequently make their way into popular consciousness right along with the movie itself. Can you guess the movie from the poster?

Program Notes: Fool For Love (1985)

Fool For Love movie poster

Kansas City native Robert Altman's most publicized film from the ‘80s was Fool for Love (1985), based on Sam Shepard’s Pulitzer-nominated off-Broadway hit.

New on the DVD Shelves: Beginners (2010)

Beginners movie poster

Beginners, the second feature from writer/director and modern-day Renaissance man Mike Mills, is a bizarrely funny, sweet, sexy and quite moving movie about a depressed guy. Go figure.

Program Notes: The Right Stuff (1983)

The Right Stuff movie poster

From the vantage point of 30 years, it is now possible to see Phil Kaufman’s The Right Stuff as one of the best films of the Eighties, a slice of Americana filled with the adventure of space exploration.

Library Life

Calling All Chefs: Food for Fines Book Lovers' Recipe Contest

Harvesters food bin photo

Do you have the cooking chops to become the Kansas City Public Library’s resident Top Chef? In celebration of Food for Fines (Nov. 7-13), we’re holding a recipe contest to see who can come up with the best dish using nonperishable food.

Book Reviews

Dashiell Hammett’s Red Harvest

Red Harvest book cover

It’s harvest time again, so what better time to look back at Dashiell Hammett’s Red Harvest. Hammett is credited with taking the private investigator story out of the popular pulp magazines and transforming the genre into something of literary value.

Sam Shepard: Fool for Cinema

On Mondays and Saturdays all through November, the Kansas City Public Library will be showing films starring, written by, or directed by Sam Shepard. Bob Butler discusses his legacy.

Movie Quiz: In a Few Words

Movie reel

Movie industry types love to describe films with just a few well-chosen words. Here are 20 well-known movies and thumbnail descriptions. Pair them up.

Program Notes: Paris, Texas (1984)

Paris, Texas movie poster

Sam Shepard doesn’t appear in Paris, Texas (1984), but his fingerprints are all over it. His dramas specialize in American families coming apart under the weight of spiritual emptiness.

Library Life

Big Small Business Comes to the Library for Global Entrepreneurship Week

Mary Carol Garrity Cradle of Entrepreneurs photo

Public libraries have always been beacons for entrepreneurs. Recent graduates and seasoned professionals alike need easy, affordable access to pertinent information that will help their businesses grow. Libraries charge neither tuition nor membership dues, and many of their resources, such as powerful databases, are available online.

New on the DVD Shelves: Exporting Raymond (2010)

Exporting Raymond movie poster

When Everybody Loves Raymond ended its run after nine years and 210 episodes, creator Phil Rosenthal began thinking about whether his TV show about a bickering but basically loving middle-class family might translate to other cultures.

Kansas City Public Library Beta