KC Public Library Blog

All Library locations will close at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, December 24 and remain closed on Thursday, December 25 in observance of the Christmas holiday.

Featured Authors

Twain and Benton: A Match Made in Missouri

Riverboat Illustration

A leader of the regionalist movement in 20th century American art, Thomas Hart Benton showed the same fascination for ordinary people and bucolic settings that his fellow Missourian Mark Twain popularized in his writings the century before. Benton was the natural choice to illustrate three of Twain's books reprinted in the 1930s and '40s.

Learn Something

How to Find the Perfect Novel

What's next? It’s the book lover's eternal question. Your Facebook friends may have suggestions, but have they done the research? Amazon tells you what other people bought, but how relevant is that, really? When you're looking for that next great read, the book recommendation database NoveList finds fiction to match your tastes.

Library Life

Know Your Librarians: Kim Patton

Kim Patton by Elise Del Vecchio

Kim Patton likes books with lots of angst. This is one reason why she’s perfectly suited for life as a teen librarian. When she talks about the sci-fi thriller Unwind by Neal Shusterman or the apocalyptic Gone by Michael Grant, she radiates enthusiasm.

Bill Murray's Brilliant Sadness

Lost in Translation

When thinking of the post-Ghostbusters Bill Murray, whose career is being featured this month in our Film Vault, one tends to assume that his acting career has taken a turn for the serious in recent years, a veritable Tom Hanksian transformation, if you will.

Featured Authors

Changing KC, One Corrected Typo at a Time

The Great Typo Hunt: Deck and Herson come to the Plaza Branch Wednesday, September 8.

Misspellings on marquees, apostrophe abuse in ads – Jeff Deck and Benjamin Herson have seen it all. The Great Typo Hunt documents their road trip with friends ridding America of grammatical errors. In honor of their presentation at the Plaza Branch (click here for details), we conducted a typo hunt of our own around Kansas City.

Library Life

Social Networkers Plug Into Local History at the Westport Branch

Tim Westcott lectures on General Order No. 11

On a hot Saturday last month, 50 people gathered at the Westport Branch to learn about another August day 147 years ago, when soldiers ordered 20,000 Missouri civilians from their homes. It was a period in local history as regrettable as it is compelling. In the Union Army's reprisal for guerrilla raids against places like Lawrence, Kansas, lives were lost and houses burned.

Library Life

Back to School, Westside-style

Uncle Sam juggles with schoolkids at the Ruiz Branch. (Photos by Elise Del Vecchio)

It’s the first week of the 2010 school year in Kansas City, Missouri, a time of energy and excitement. And for many parents, it’s a time for cutting back – those no. 2 pencils and spiral notebooks add up. Thanks to the KC Public Library’s Ruiz Branch, nearly 200 Westside families got a break from the school-supply squeeze.

Book Reviews

The Best New Horror Fiction

The Feed by Mira Grant

This year I have the great honor of being a member of the American Library Association’s national committee to pick the best genre books of the year for the award called The Reading List. I am spending my year reading brand-new books in seven different genres and am, along with my committee members, trying to find the year’s best-of-the-best in Romance, Fantasy, Science Fiction, Women's Fiction, Historical Fiction, Mystery and Horror.  

Book Reviews

Book Review: Lawrence Survivors of Quantrill's Raid

The survivors of the Lawrence Massacre are featured in a new book.

Of William Quantrill, the Reverend H.D. Fisher wrote: “In him were represented courage and cowardice; successful leadership, intrigue, cunning, desperation, revenge and hate, all to a marked degree.” Fisher would have known, too – Quantrill nearly killed him.

Featured Authors

A Crime Anthology for the Modern Mystery Lover

Rosemary Herbert discusses her New Omnibus of Crime August 26 at the Plaza Branch.

From Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot to CSI’s Catherine Willows, crime writing has changed a lot in the past 75 years. A New Omnibus of Crime shows how crime fiction has developed from a genteel genre populated by old ladies solving crimes over tea to a scientific discipline full of cold-blooded killers.

Library Life

Watch Meet the Past Episodes Online

Portrait of Jesse James by A.L. Dillenbeck - Missouri Valley Special Collections

Have you met Jesse James? Charlie Parker? How about Amelia Earhart? Last year, these and other local legends barnstormed the Library for Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper. Now you can watch all of KCPT's televised episodes and relive more than a century of KC history without leaving your homestead.

Featured Authors

The Revolution Will Be Photographed

Page One of the Heilongjiang Daily, April 6, 1968 - Photograph © Li Zhensheng (Contact Press Images)

Imagine President Obama jumping into the Potomac for a swim, in the process signaling a violent youth movement that overturned state and local governments. Hard to believe? Something much like that happened in 1966 when Mao Zedong launched China's Cultural Revolution.

Featured Authors

Worgul's World of Barbecue

Thin Blue Smoke by Doug Worgul

Kansas City is often referred to as the Barbecue Capital of the World – an assertion its citizens take very seriously. Doug Worgul’s new novel, Thin Blue Smoke, offers a fictionalized take on our town’s famous barbecue scene.

Featured Authors

The Moment of Hitchcock

Moment of Psycho - Thomson

Voyeurism is an acceptable trait in a filmmaker. But sadism? In his new book, The Moment of Psycho: How Alfred Hitchcock Taught America to Love Murder, celebrated critic David Thomson shows how Alfred Hitchcock damaged his audiences even more than his actresses.

Book Buddies Beat the Summer Slide

Book Buddies at Central

Getting kids energized about reading in the summertime demands creativity. During the months when a cool, dark bedroom and the flickering screen of a PSP beckons sweetly, it’s hard enough getting kids to pick up a book, much less come to the Library. Here's how a few crafty children's librarians got kids enjoying activities centered on reading.