Book reviews

Zombies! Or, There’s No Such Thing as a Live Cat in Tom Sawyer

Cat illustration from Tom Sawyer by Thomas Hart Benton

Oh Tom and Huck, the scourges of childhood befall you with astonishing regularity. Whether it’s Injun Joe, dark caves, or an endless parade of preachers, teachers, and other interfering adults, the children of St. Petersburg can handle it all. But there’s something even more sinister lurking in these pages.

Big Read Recap: Tom Sawyer, Chs. XXXIII-XXXV, Conclusion

Tom Sawyer cover

If readers were doubting that Tom Sawyer was the quintessential boy’s book, the final three chapters will dispel any doubt. Twain folds in every fantasy any boy has ever entertained in the conclusion to his first solo effort to write a novel.

A Long, Long Sleep - Teen Book Review

A Long, Long Sleep by Anna Sheehan.

In this bittersweet and beautiful retelling of Sleeping Beauty, Sheehan weaves a riveting sci-fi fairytale story that makes you fall in love with the characters and remember them way after you finish the book. It combines heart-breaking emotion that amazes you and revolts you at the same time. The story begins with Rose, A princess to a major company that owns the world and a girl locked in her own dreams. But she's been locked in her dreams so long that she doesn't know when to wake up. As the story goes she,of course, gets "awakened" with a kiss. The modern day twist is that she finds herself sixty-two years into the future with her life more changed and shaken up than ever.

Kepler's Witch by James Connor

Kepler's Witch book cover

In a book about a 17th century astronomer the reader expects to learn something of the stars and planets along with the standard biographical details. Religious wars and witchcraft, both prevalent at that period, might show up as well.

Big Read Recap: Chs. XXIX - XXXII

Tom Saywer 1st Edition Cover

Whether you are a child or an adult, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a wonderful read. But isn’t it amazing how different the experience is reading the book as a child versus reading it as an adult?