The Food Lovers' Guide to Kansas City

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Book Reviews
Food Lovers' Guide to Kansas City
A Food Lovers' Guide is a read that will stick to your ribs.

Already world famous for its lip-smacking barbecue, Kansas City proves it has much more to offer the culinary palate in the Food Lovers’ Guide To Kansas City by Sylvie Hogg Murphy.

Just published in September 2011, Food Lovers’ Guide To Kansas City lists a large variety of restaurants, from quaint eateries with farm-fresh seasonal offerings like The Farmhouse or Blue Bird Bistro; to classic steak houses, like Jess and Jim's or The Golden Ox; to wonderful Asian choices like the Vietnam Café or Lulu’s Thai Noodle Shop; or even new culinary hot spots like Genessee Royale Bistro in the West Bottoms. 

The guide is divided into 11 geographic areas and includes the address, phone number, web site, price range, and hours of each food establishment.  There is also a personal review of each location along with menu favorites and helpful tips about individual restaurants. 

Even better, within each geographic area, the locations are divided up further into four main sections:  area favorites, long-established landmarks, places to go on special occasions, and specialty stores and markets.

The Food Lovers’ Guide to Kansas City may not be as quick as using a mobile app to help suggest a new dining experience, but it provides a wealth of information all in one place. In addition to typical restaurant listings, the guide lists local farmers markets, delis, wine stores, butchers and bakeries, cafes, taverns, wine bars, food events, information about local wine and urban farmsteading classes, and even a few recipes from some of Kansas City’s top chefs.

Additionally, the guide lists local papers and media with devoted sections to food and drink (i.e. The Kansas City Star, The Pitch, Ink, Tastebud, PBS’s TV show, “Check Please”) and local food blog sites such as the Making of a Foodie, KC Napkins, and KC Lunch Spots.

Size-wise, Food Lovers’ Guide To Kansas City is fairly small, making it easy to slip into a backpack, purse, or car storage compartment if you want to have it handy when you are out and about and get the urge to try a new place. 

Also, don’t be surprised if Food Lovers’ Guide to Kansas City is your “impulse” selection at the library – just like when you are at the grocery store and you fill your cart with your regular items, but then when you get to the checkout, you impulsively grab a candy bar or magazine as a fun, feel-good item.  Food Lovers’ Guide is the same way.  It grabs your attention.

When you pick it up, you see the mouth-watering ribs pictured on the front cover and imagine their smoky, tender aroma wafting from within the pages.  Then you notice the book’s cute size, flip through it and see how packed with information the pages are, and before you know it, the book ends up on the top of your stack of items to check out.

You are being forewarned that Food Lovers’ Guide to Kansas City doesn’t and can’t cover every great restaurant in Kansas City, and it doesn’t explore some geographic areas as well as it could (suburban areas), but it is a great place to begin your dining exploration of Kansas City. And who knows, maybe we’ll be lucky enough to see a second edition of this gastronomical gem sometime in the future.

About the Author

Amy Morris

Amy Morris is a librarian technical assistant at the Westport Branch. She earned a B.A. in English, with an emphasis in creative writing, from Avila University. Besides reading and writing, Amy enjoys traveling, art, being creative, and spending time with her family.

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