Library Life

As a digital inclusion leader, the Kansas City Public Library provides many ways to engage in digital learning, including a Digital Media Lab for teens, over 300 public access computers available over a ten branch system, recurring computer classes and one-on-one tutoring through our new volunteer Tech Coach program as well as Career Online High School and a Hotspots program in partnership with the local school district.  When we discovered learning circles through Peer 2 Peer University, the doors opened to yet another exciting avenue for digital learning!
The Kansas City Public Library has been making a lot of changes recently that are improving the experience for you, our patrons.

First, we updated our website. Next, we began implementing a new tagging system for library materials. And now we are changing our online catalog system. 

The catalog allows you to search our materials, place holds on items, and interact with your account. The system will allow you to interact with our library staff more easily, create themed lists, review books, and share your recommendations within the library community.
Image courtesy KCPT
Centropolis, a new program from KCPT-TV, is an ongoing conversation about ideas, books, characters, and the absorbing issues of our times. The title comes from William Gilpin, a 19th-century mapmaker and early booster of Kansas City, who believed that civilization’s capital would be an area of greater Kansas City he called “Centropolis.”
Kansas City Public Library has been selected by Peer to Peer University to participate in the next phase of its global expansion. 
From the outside, Herman Lang’s scrapbook looks like any other nondescript, old book.  He created it a little over a century ago as a record of one his hobbies.  However, this is no ordinary scrapbook.  Inside, it contains a story of adventure, suspected espionage, and balloons. 

The Kansas City Public Library will begin temporarily closing its branches in early November 2016 to upgrade its checkout system. The staggered closures will allow staffers to install new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags on books and other materials available to patrons. The process will last into early 2017.

What is an archivist? What do archivists do? And what exactly are the Missouri Valley Special Collections? If you have ever pondered these questions, now is your chance to #AskAnArchivist! 
New website kclibrary.org
After much hard work and planning, we are proud to unveil the Kansas City Public Library’s new and improved website.
First Folio

Although each state gets its turn with a Folio, one thing that will not be found outside Kansas City are the University of Missouri-Kansas City-trained docents that have accompanied the book during its stay here.

First Folio

Not only does the Folio contain an impressive number of plays, it also has amassed quite a collection of interesting facts regarding its production, history, and existence.

First Folio

Thousands of visitors have made their way to the Kansas City Public Library to revel in a rare copy of Shakespeare's First Folio, which is on display in the downtown Central Library through June 28.

First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare is on display through June 28th, 2016, on the 5th floor of the Central Library.

When is the last time you found yourself befuddled and commented, "It’s all Greek to me?" Do certain tasks leave you believing they will take "forever and a day?" Many phrases in our common vernacular are credited to William Shakespeare and would arguably be lost to our phraseology if not for the First Folio.

Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner, Photo by Paul Andrews

The Library's Deputy Director of Strategic Initatives Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner will take over as executive director of the American Jazz Museum in Kansas City's historic 18th & Vine District.

April Roy, manager of our Bluford Branch, has been honored by the American Library Association with the I Love My Librarian Award.

The Library and American Public Square kick off a series of spring discussions of some of the city’s most polarizing issues—minus the invective that too often feeds polarity—in early December.

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