Library Life

First Folio

Although each state gets its turn with a Folio, one thing that will not be found outside Kansas City are the University of Missouri-Kansas City-trained docents that have accompanied the book during its stay here.

First Folio

Not only does the Folio contain an impressive number of plays, it also has amassed quite a collection of interesting facts regarding its production, history, and existence.

First Folio

Thousands of visitors have made their way to the Kansas City Public Library to revel in a rare copy of Shakespeare's First Folio, which is on display in the downtown Central Library through June 28.

First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare is on display through June 28th, 2016, on the 5th floor of the Central Library.

When is the last time you found yourself befuddled and commented, "It’s all Greek to me?" Do certain tasks leave you believing they will take "forever and a day?" Many phrases in our common vernacular are credited to William Shakespeare and would arguably be lost to our phraseology if not for the First Folio.

Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner, Photo by Paul Andrews

The Library's Deputy Director of Strategic Initatives Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner will take over as executive director of the American Jazz Museum in Kansas City's historic 18th & Vine District.

April Roy, manager of our Bluford Branch, has been honored by the American Library Association with the I Love My Librarian Award.

The Library and American Public Square kick off a series of spring discussions of some of the city’s most polarizing issues—minus the invective that too often feeds polarity—in early December.

The Kansas City Public Library remains among a select group of public libraries across the country, earning a 4-star designation from Library Journal.

The Kansas City Public Library is one of 21 nationwide recipients to receive a $100,000 grant to help launch a two-year program aimed at improving financial literacy.

We have partnered with the Women's Employment Network and other local agencies to provide a range of services, including workshops, web resources, and individual financial coaching, to residents who are looking to enhance their money-managing skills but may lack access to reliable, unbiased education opportunities and resources. The Money Matters Workshop Series is projected intended to reach hundreds of residents in areas most in need served by our North-East, Bluford, and Southeast Branches.

Currently, workshops are being held at these three locations and we are looking to expand to local area community centers, social services agencies, and religious facilities. The Money Matters Workshops will cover banking, budgeting, credit management, and protection against identity theft.

The Women's Employment Network and other financial opportunity centers will also offer free individual financial coaching sessions to workshop participants. The Money Matters Workshop Series and coaching are open to anyone but specifically targeting:

Food For Fines 2015

Donate food items to Harvesters at any Kansas City Public Library location and for each item we'll give you a $1 credit towards your existing overdue fines.

Library Director of Strategic Initiatives Cheptoo Kositany-Buckner and Director Crosby Kemper III pose with the Library's second consecutive Emmy.

Our unique historical series Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III landed its second regional Emmy Award in as many years over the weekend.

Through an AmeriCorps VISTA grant from the Corporation for National and Community Service, the Kansas City Public Library is working breaking the cycle of poverty with the support and service of four VISTA members.

As a beloved and longstanding institution, the American Royal owes much of its early success to the Kansas City Stock Yards (KCSY) Company. The bond between the Stockyards and the growing organization was certainly one of mutual benefit. The American Royal needed leadership, financing, and housing; the Kansas City Stockyards needed a thriving livestock industry. This relationship, which lasted for the greater part of the 20th century, proved to be successful.

Reference librarian Judy Klamm examines a nearly 80-year-old reference book while weeding at the Central Library.

Clothes. Cars. Computers. They don’t last forever, succumbing to wear and tear, obsolescence, or shifts in interests and tastes. It’s the same with library books.

It’s the same with library books. The Kansas City Public Library counts some 747,000 items in its collection, housing close to half of them in its downtown Central Library. They age. Some are torn or stained. Others languish on the shelves, unnoticed or unneeded by patrons for years. If not timeless classics, it might be time for them to go.

Just how does a Library book find its way onto the shelf? With the recent release of the highly-anticipated Go Set a Watchman, this is a good opportunity to give you a behind the scenes look at how things work at the Kansas City Public Library.

Purchasing decisions start in the Collection Development department, run by Debbie Stoppello. The Library is always adding new titles: It could be a newly-released crime novel or a perennial favorite children’s book. High demand titles and bestsellers are almost always purchased, but the Library also tries to acquire a good selection of award-winning books, significant cultural or literary works, as well as 'in-fill' or replacement copies of books that are already in the collection.

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