Library Life

Kansas City Royals Hall of Famer Frank White launches his new memoir with a public event on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, at the Kansas City Public Library Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

To mark this home-run event, we’re giving our social media-savvy Library fans a chance to win two autographed copies of his new memoir, and two signed baseballs. Read on and play ball…

Frank White was considered by many to be the premiere second baseman of his generation. An outstanding fielder (he won eight Gold Gloves), White was also potent at the plate (he was one of only two second basemen to bat cleanup in a World Series after Jackie Robinson).

He was also a Kansas City icon. He played his entire career for the Royals, helping lead the team to two World Series appearances and a World Series victory over the St. Louis Cardinals in 1985. His No. 20 is one of only three Royals numbers to be retired.

He later managed the Royals’ AA affiliate – then in Wichita, Kansas – and later became the color commentator for the big league club.

On Wednesday, October 23, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, White will discuss his memoir One Man’s Dream: My Town, My Team, My Time, which gives fans an inside look at White’s baseball legacy and also touches on his dramatic split with the Royals in 2012.

In the run-up to this exciting event the Library is offering our followers on Facebook and Twitter the chance to win one of two autographed Frank White baseballs, plus two signed copies of One Man's Dream. Here’s how to enter:

Frank White Book & Ball Giveaway


Facebook Users


  • Like the Library at facebook.com/kclibrary (optional).
  • RSVP on kclibrary.org for the event Frank White: One Man’s Dream – My Town, My Team, My Time on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.
  • On the RSVP form, choose “Facebook” in the menu under “How did you hear about this event?” (Be sure to enter your name and contact information.)
  • Come to the event on October 23 to find out if you won! (Must be present to win.)


Twitter Users


  • Follow the Library on Twitter at twitter.com/kclibrary
  • Tweet about the contest with hashtag #frankwhitekc. Tag @kclibrary and @Frank20White.
  • RSVP on kclibrary.org for the event Frank White: One Man’s Dream – My Town, My Team, My Time on Tuesday, October 23, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.
  • Choose “Twitter” in the menu under “How did you hear about this event?” (Be sure to enter your name and contact information.)
  • Come to the event on October 23 to find out if you won! (Must be present to win.)


Rules: The entry period ends at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, October 23, 2012. You may enter the contest only once. (Multiple entries past your initial entry will be discarded.) And yes, you must be present at the October 23 event to claim your prize.

More great memorabilia will be given away at the event, so if you miss out on the Book & Ball Giveaway online, you still have a chance to win something good. Additionally, White will sign copies of the book following the event.

Plus, you’ll get to hear the exciting story of one of Kansas City’s greatest athletes and a true hometown hero.

-- Your KC Library Public Affairs Team

For a library, sending people to Google may sound, well, a bit self-defeating. But when we learned that Google would be launching its brand-new, ultra-high-speed network in Kansas City, we began preparing for a Google Fiber future.

Now, with the end of Google’s initial “rally” period in KC, we are happy to report that the Kansas City Public Library is going to be one of the first places in the world where you can access Google Fiber for free.

It’s been a long road to becoming one of the world’s first Fiber-equipped public libraries, however.

In the Beginning…

In the months following the spring 2011 announcement that Fiber was coming to KC, we had few details of how it would be deployed, who would get it first (whether homes or businesses), or what it would cost. We knew only that Google had struck a deal with Kansas City to provide free service to 300 schools, libraries, and other public buildings chosen by the city (see 6g in the agreement here).

Though we had little information to go on, the Library immediately recognized the potential positive impact that high-speed connectivity could bring to our service area.


Aaron Deacon of SMCKC speaks
at a Library Give Us a Gig! event

As a public library, we are the main access point to computer and Internet technology for people who don’t have that access at home. We have provided a free Internet connection to Kansas Citians since the mid 1990s, and our current tech resources include more than 700 public computers and free public wi-fi at all 10 of our locations.

Boasting speeds 100 times faster than broadband, Google Fiber presents not only a significant boost to our existing electronic services but also an opportunity to build brand-new resources that would utilize the massive, 1GB pipe.

As we began dreaming of what we could do with this exciting technology (community-uploaded data! livestreaming cultural events!), so did others in the community.

Joining the Discussion

In the latter half of 2011, as it became clear that Google Fiber would be provided to homes and public buildings first, the Library positioned itself as a hub of discussion around how this technology could benefit citizens. Last fall, we partnered with the Social Media Club of Kansas City to host Building the Gigabit City: Brainstorming a Google Fiber Roadmap, the first major community summit to address the potential impact of Google Fiber in KC.

On October 3, 2011, 80 participants from the business, IT, and education communities convened for a day-long workshop at the Central Library to discuss how Google Fiber could be leveraged to benefit all areas of city life, including K-12 schools, higher education, health care, the urban core, suburban areas, community activities, the environment, and, of course, libraries. That evening, another 162 people listened to a summation of the daytime session’s analyses and initial conclusions.

Video of Gigabit City: Brainstorming a Google Fiber Roadmap

The results of the October brainstorming session were officially released a month later at another Library event, Gigabit City: 1,001 Uses for Google Fiber, at which the Building a Gigabit City Report was released before a crowd of 150. Local radio and TV outlets covered the action.

Next, the Library began providing ongoing support to the Social Media Club's Give Us a Gig! initiative, which aimed to bring the Google Fiber discussion into the neighborhoods.  We also hosted the entrepreneur-focused Gigabit Challenge: A Global Business Plan Competition, a day-long startup contest that accidentally brought our wi-fi network to a crashing halt from the attendees’ online activity (a Library first).

Then in spring 2012, as Google prepared to make its announcement, the Library hosted a digital inclusion forum that brought together community leaders (including our Library Director Crosby Kemper III) and Google representatives for a discussion of high-speed broadband and the digital divide. The Library’s role as an access point in underserved communities was batted about by the panelists.

But it wouldn’t be until July 2012 – more than a year after the initial announcement – that we would find out Google’s actual Fiber scheme.

Rallying for the Prize

On the morning of July 26, 2012, at its freshly christened Fiber Space in the heart of midtown KC, Google laid out its Fiber options for home subscribers: (1.) a Google TV-plus-Internet bundle at $120/mo, (2.) 1GB Internet at $70/mo, or (3.) a “free Internet” service consisting of 5MB broadband at $0/mo after a $300 construction fee, paid either at once or over 12 months.

Google also announced that it would hold a six-week “rally period” during which citizens were asked to show their interest in Google Fiber by paying a $10 pre-registration fee that could be applied to their first bill.

Carving the city into “Fiberhoods,” Google set minimum pre-registration goals for each zone, from five to 25 percent, based on population density. Google made it clear this was a one-shot deal; only the Fiberhoods that hit their goals by September 9, 2012, would be eligible for Fiber in the future. And that also applied to any schools, libraries, hospitals, community centers, or other public buildings inside those Fiberhoods.

For us, this meant that if our patrons didn’t see the value of having Fiber in their neighborhood, there was a good chance we wouldn’t get it at the Library.

Google divided KC into "Fiberhoods" that had to hit pre-registration goals to get Google Fiber.

Fortunately, our patrons know what’s good for their community. Two days before the rally period closed on September 9, 2012, at midnight, the eight Library locations that were eligible for Fiber had met their neighborhood goals (our two easternmost branches were outside of the initial rollout).

This rally period, however, was a rollercoaster ride for the Library.

For starters, some Fiberhoods hit their marks faster than others. Our Waldo and Westport Branches, located in higher-income neighborhoods, qualified quickly.

(Side note: Household income wasn’t necessarily the driver, however. In Fiberhoods with high percentages of apartment and condo buildings, residents of “multi-dwelling units” experienced persistent problems that had to be resolved on Google’s end. This affected our two biggest libraries: Central and Plaza, which didn’t come through until the final week as property owners finally became able to pre-register in bulk.)

Driving pre-registrations at our branch libraries that serve lower-income areas of town proved the greatest challenge. In these parts of town, many people not only lack Internet service, they lack computers, email addresses, and sometimes even credit cards – all of which are required for pre-registration.

As the weeks passed, we sent out scads of fliers and online messages about how Google Fiber could help the Library. But as Fiberhoods on the east side of town struggled to move the needle, stories in the media emerged regarding the way Google’s Fiber map was highlighting the digital divide in Kansas City. Meanwhile, neighborhood initiatives such as Neighbor.ly’s Paint the Town Green effort began collecting donations to push Fiberhoods closer to their goals.

That’s when we decided to take things into our own hands.

Bluford Branch manager April Roy and staffer Bernie Norcott-Mahany help patrons pre-register for Google Fiber

We saw that it would take just over $1,000 to pay the entire pre-registration costs in two crucial Fiberhoods: Key Coalition North, which contains our L.H. Bluford Branch, and South Town Fork Creek, home to our Southeast Branch.

Internet/computer use at these two libraries is among the highest of all of our branches, and thus it was not surprising that patrons there were not interested in pre-registering for a service they wouldn’t be able to afford at home.

However, after securing a generous donation from the Friends of the Kansas City Public Library to cover the fees, it was easier to encourage people to pre-register. We explained that even if the customers chose not to get Google Fiber at home (in which case the $10 fee would be refunded), their local libraries and schools would still get the free connection. That pitch, it seemed, provided the tipping point.

Still, it took a lot of work.

In addition to asking our Bluford and Southeast staff to campaign at the service desk, we relied on neighborhood activists and community organizations such as LINC to help get the word out.

Fiber Going Forward

Now, the rally period has ended, and though our Library will be getting Google Fiber, many communities we serve did not meet their pre-registration goals. Google has indicated that these Fiberhoods will receive a second chance to sign up sometime in the future, and that grants will be awarded to community groups to increase digital literacy in the community.

Meanwhile, as outlets from Wired to the New York Times report on digital divide issues in Kansas City in the wake of the Fiber rally, the Kansas City Public Library will work to close that divide.

We will not only continue to provide access to the best technology we can for all people in the community. We will increase our outreach efforts to show people how getting connected can help them search for jobs, excel at school, launch their own businesses, research their family’s history, and access a world of knowledge – to name a few benefits.

Google Fiber will make us faster, bigger, more powerful. But using technology to improve people’s lives is what we do anyway.

We’re a public library, you know.

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

In the new free film series Movies That Matter, the Library’s film czar, Robert W. Butler, has programmed 20 films he deems essential to film literacy. They range from Citizen Kane to Snow White.

But if we put you in the director's seat, what movies would you pick? Would you opt for pure enjoyment or aim for historic significance? Perhaps a bit of both?

Let us know: What are your Movies That Matter? Get creative, fire up your camcorder or webcam, and make your own video telling what movies you think everyone should see.

Post your video on YouTube and:

We'll share your video on the Library's Facebook page, and who knows -- one of your picks may end up in MTM, round 2!

Take it away, Bob...

[video:youtu.be/Pkfcnd1QfB4 width:500 align:center]

Movies that Matter show on SUNDAYS at 1:30 p.m. in Truman Forum Auditorium at the Plaza Branch.

September 2, 2012 Citizen Kane (1941: NR)
September 16, 2012 The General (1926: NR)
September 30, 2012 The Seventh Seal (1957: NR)
October 14, 2012 Rashomon (1950: NR)
October 28, 2012 Nosferatu (1922: NR)
November 4, 2012 Raging Bull (1980: R)
November 18, 2012 The Bicycle Thieves (1948: NR)
December 2, 2012 The Manchurian Candidate (1962: NR)
December 9, 2012 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1939: NR)
January 6, 2013 The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928: NR)
January 13, 2013 My Darling Clementine (1946: NR)
January 27, 2013 Bringing Up Baby (1938: NR)
February 10, 2013 All About Eve (1950: NR)
February 24, 2013 Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to

Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
(1964: NR)
March 10, 2013 The Circus (1928: NR)
March 24, 2013 Rear Window (1954: NR)
April 7, 2013 Wings of Desire (1987: PG-13)
April 21, 2013 Singin’ in the Rain (1952: NR)
May 5, 2013 Sunset Boulevard (1950: NR)
May 19, 2013 Metropolis (1927: NR)

Google Fiber is coming to Kansas City. But will it come to all of KC – or just to the neighborhoods where people are already enthusiastic about having fiber-optic power in their homes and local schools and libraries?

At the Kansas City Public Library, we want everyone to be connected. It’s why we provide more than 700 public computers plus free wi-fi to our patrons. It’s also why we’re working to insure that each of our eight locations that are eligible for Google Fiber will receive the free connection that Google has promised to public buildings in neighborhoods that reach their goal by the September 9, 2012, rally period deadline.

Wait, there's a deadline?

It’s true. Google has divided KCMO and KCK into “Fiberhoods.” Each fiberhood must rally its residents to go online at fiber.google.com and show their interest in receiving Google Fiber by paying a $10 pre-registration fee. All Fiberhoods must hit a minimum number of pre-registrations by September 9, or they will not get access to Google Fiber – and that includes the schools, libraries, community centers, hospitals, and other public buildings located inside those fiberhoods.

At the Library, we want to provide all of our patrons with access to Fiber – but especially to folks in areas of town that aren’t already wired.

Let's Do This for Libraries

Saturday, August 25, 2012: Google Fiber Free Pre-registration Drive

On Saturday, August 25, 2012, we will be holding a free pre-registration drive at two of our locations where pre-registrations are lagging:

The L.H. Bluford Branch in Key Coalition North
3050 Prospect Avenue
Kansas City, MO 64128
816.701.3482

The Southeast Branch in South Town Fork Creek
6242 Swope Parkway
Kansas City, MO 64130
816.701.3484

Three weeks into the rally period, these two Fiberhoods have received pre-registrations in the single digits and are in danger of being left behind when Fiber comes to town.

The Library has received generous funding from the Friends of the Kansas City Public Library organization to pay the $10 pre-registration fees for the first 36 people at Bluford and first 67 people at Southeast who live in those fiberhoods and come in on Saturday, August 25, 2012, between 1-5 p.m.

Pre-registrations will be paid for on a first-come, first-served basis.

If Bluford's and Southeast's Fiberhoods don’t reach their goals on Saturday, the Friends will continue to offer free pre-registrations through the Library until they hit their thresholds.

Please spread the word to any individuals and organizations you know in and around Key Coalition North and South Town Fork Creek.

Below are two fliers designed by the Library’s Public Affairs department to get the word out about our free pre-registration drive. Download them, print them, put them on doors, and email them at will.

L.H. Bluford Neighborhood Flyer (PDF)
Southeast Neighborhood Flyer (PDF)

Thanks to the Friends of the Library for helping us to help make sure our patrons have a chance at the fastest Internet connection on earth.

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

The planning has officially begun. The grant secured by Crystal Faris, Jamie Mayo, Mary Thompson, and Kim Patton to design a digital media "learning lab" for Kansas City teens is in full swing.

Thanks to these enterprising librarians' efforts, last November the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced that the Kansas City Public Library, in partnership with Science City at Union Station, would be one of 12 organizations in the U.S. to receive $100,000 in funding to plan and design a "learning lab" for teenagers and high school students.

Modeled after the YOUmedia center at the Harold Washington Library in Chicago, the lab will encourage teens to use digital media technology such as social networking, video games, and audio/visual media production to create, collaborate, and widen their world in ways that they typically aren't able to in the traditional classroom.

But before a lab can be built, plans must be laid.

"The essence of this grant is R&D," says Andrea Ellis, the Library's digital media lab project coordinator. A native of Kansas City, Ellis holds a Master's in Communications and Film Production from the School of Education at NYU. Before moving back to KC two years ago, she worked in training and outreach at Arlington Independent Media, a public access TV outlet that serves the Washington, D.C., area.

"This is such a rare gift," Ellis says. "It allows us to play and figure out what we want to do. I've done other federal grants before, and usually you're implementing and then trying to figure out what worked and what didn't."

Over the next 18 months, Ellis will work with our youth services librarians and representatives from Science City to develop a prototype for a lab in Union Station and a mobile lab to travel between branches.

"It's a cool opportunity we haven't had before to be a part of the cutting-edge research in 21st century learning in museums and libraries," says Jamie Mayo, Central Youth Services manager.

Part of that research incorporates the HOMAGO model developed by University of California researcher Mizuko Ito. Short for "hanging out, messing around, geeking out," HOMAGO teaches that teens learn best when given a safe space in which to play, learn, create, and interact.

Watch a video about Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out

So how will the Library and Science City get local teens geeked?

Answering that question is what this year's grant is for.

Involving Our Teens

In addition to providing the funds to hire Ellis, the grant will allow Faris, Mayo, Ellis, and other planning committee members to travel to three training workshops, in Chicago, San Francisco, and DC.

Money will also be invested in equipment such as laptops, cameras, and software for use in hands-on testing with teens.

The grant will also be used to recruit and compensate a Teen Advisory Board whose members will assist with the R&D process and conduct teen focus groups.

"These will be competitive, paid positions," Mayo stresses. "It's important to show that your talents can garner you money."

Applications for membership on the board will be distributed at the first major lab-related event, the Teen Summit on August 25 at Union Station.

The Summit will invite around 40 teens from the Library's service district to check out potential spaces in Science City and discuss what they want from the lab.

Soliciting feedback from teens, after all, is a crucial part of the process.

"The essence of this is that it's safe for teens and meets them where their interests are," Ellis says.

Finding out those interests will be a major task for Ellis and her colleagues (including those on the Teen Advisory Board) in the coming months.

Building a framework for financial support is important, too. When the planning grant expires in June 2013, more funding will be needed to build the lab. That money may come from an implementation grant, corporate sponsors, or other sources.

"The grant allows us to create a solid plan that we can use to seek funding for the physical lab at Union Station, so including sustainability in the plan is vital," Faris says.

For now, Faris and Ellis remain excited.

"It's a movement," Ellis says, "and it's exciting to be a part of a movement that's having a positive impact on teens and youth in Kansas City."

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

The Kansas City Public Library could become one of the first public libraries in the nation to provide customers a free connection to Google’s cutting-edge high-speed fiber optic network. But we need your help to get it.

Though Google will deliver on its promise to provide a free connection to libraries, schools, hospitals, community centers, and other public buildings in Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan., there is a catch.

Google is not going to hook up those buildings unless the people who live in the neighborhoods around them demonstrate an interest in getting Google Fiber at home.

In other words, Google is not going to build the physical infrastructure for Fiber without some indication people will subscribe to the service. That’s why it has carved the two cities into “Fiberhoods.” These areas must each meet a designated threshold of pre-registrations (usually about 10% of the pop. density) by a deadline of September 9, 2012, or no one in those neighborhoods will have a chance at getting Fiber.

To show Google that you want Fiber in your neighborhood, go to fiber.google.com, enter your address, and pledge $10. The ten bucks can be taken off your first bill if you do decide to get Fiber (see the Plans & Pricing for details on packages, including a "Free Internet" service that gets you free broadband for 6 years).

And even if you don’t want Fiber at home, your money will go toward giving libraries, schools, and other important community access points a free connection to the gigabit-speed network – which they can, in turn, give back to the community.

Here’s five reasons why you should help the Kansas City Public Library get Google Fiber.

  1. More Bandwidth = More Access – Visit any of our branches any day of the week and you’ll see row upon row of public computers with patrons busily pounding away at each of them, with more people waiting their turn. We not only provide broadband Internet access through 700+ public terminals, each of our branches is equipped with free wi-fi for patrons who bring their own devices (sometimes setting up in our parking lots after hours to grab the free signal). With the 100-times-faster speeds of Google Fiber, our existing service will increase a hundredfold, allowing patrons to fire off emails, upload job applications, update their blogs, and watch educational TED talks faster than ever before.
  2. The Digital Divide – Public libraries are the main technology access points for people in the community who don’t have Internet – or in many cases, computers, period – at home. Google Fiber will allow us not only to provide unprecedented network speeds to the most technologically under-served patrons in KC, we will also use it to develop new programs and initiatives that will help teach people to use technology to better their lives. (One quick example: The Library recently secured a $100,000 grant to plan a digital media Learning Lab for teens at Science City in Union Station.)
  3. Smart Libraries, Smart City – There is a movement underway to make Kansas City a “smart city,” which means, in a nutshell, harnessing large amounts of public data and using it to make the city run more efficiently. It touches areas like energy consumption, transportation, public safety, health, mobility, water, and other civic systems. Libraries are integral to the smart city equation. Librarians have always been stewards of the community’s data. They collect, authenticate, and catalog data and build the tools and systems that make information easy to access and use for real-world purposes.
  4. Economic Development – With his Turn the Page program, KCMO Mayor Sly James has made the goal of getting all children up to grade-level reading by 3rd grade his single most important economic development objective. No other institution is better able to prepare kids for reading success than the public library. And it isn’t just kids. As we’ve been learning through our Cradle of Entrepreneurs series of public conversations with Kansas City’s top business founders, every entrepreneur has a story about going to the library to do everything from conduct research to get inspiration from the books on the shelves. By boosting our citizens’ brainpower, libraries boost our economy.
  5. It’s Free! – Maybe the best reason of all: libraries are free to use. As our mission states, we are a doorway to knowledge for all people in the community. From the books on our shelves to e-books in the cloud, from helping parents get their children ready to read at school to bringing world-renowned authors to speak before diverse crowds, the Kansas City Public Library will continue providing the best resources we can muster, free of charge. Though pre-registration for Google Fiber will cost you $10, that’s money well spent toward making all of our branch libraries better beacons of free knowledge to the entire community.

That’s just an overview. We’ve got a lot more specific ideas cooking for how to take advantage of the Google Fiber connection.

Kansas City Public Libraries in the Fiberhood

To give you a sense of what we need to accomplish, here’s a list of all our branches, which Fiberhoods they’re in, and the threshold needed for each to get Fiber. (Click the links to see current standings)

Central Library: Business District (424 pre-registrations needed)
I.H. Ruiz Branch: West Side North (91)
L.H. Bluford Branch: Key Coalition North (41)*
Plaza Branch: South Plaza East (142)
North-East: South Indian Mound (43)*
Southeast: South Town Fork Creek (67)*
Waldo: Tower Homes South (119)†
Westport: Westport (48 needed)†
Total Goal: 975 pre-registrations

*As of this post, these libraries’ Fiberhoods have received fewer than 10 pre-registrations.
†Goal reached!

(Note: Trails West and Sugar Creek Branches currently not eligible as they are outside KCMO city limits.)

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

When Ritchie Momon thinks of his history at the Kansas City Public Library, the image that stands out is of an open door.

The door stood across a courtyard at Southeast High School. Beyond it lay the school's library, where Momon would head every day after school and during summers as a kid.

Later, in his freshman year at Southeast, he would go through that door to work the card catalog as a library clerk.
It was there that Momon learned to become a steward of knowledge.

"Before the computer age, when you needed to know something, books were the first line on information, the first place you'd go," Momon says.

Now, 31 years after his first job at Southeast, Momon is about to become director of one of the biggest libraries in the city, the Kansas City Public Library's Plaza Branch, where he will succeed the recently retired Dorothy Elliott as Branch Director.

Like so many great librarians, Momon worked his way from the ground floor up, moving through just about every department in the system before turning branch manager. He worked through college and while getting his MLS at the University of Missouri (for which he took a year off, the only year he hasn't worked in a library in three decades).

After graduating high school, Momon got his first full-time job at the Library. It was in the Community Services department (now called Outreach Services) in the old Main Library. Next, he worked as a clerk at the former Prospect Branch.

He then moved to the newly built Bluford Branch, then hopped to the North-East Branch as a technical assistant. From there, he went back downtown to work as a computer technician in ITS as the Kansas City Library Consortium was being formed.

After a stint in Youth Services, he moved up to branch manager at Trails West, the Library's only Independence location, where he has spent a successful six years.
What's made those years a success? Momon's dedication to customer service.

"People who come into the library have a choice about where to go, and they choose us," he says. "We are one of the only free public services in the metro area. Everywhere else you go, there is some membership fee, and our membership - a library card - is free."

"Even though we're free," he continues, "we're a choice they've made, and we want to make the best of people's choices."

While Momon is a firm believer in providing consistent and fair service to all customers, he also places value on learning patrons' names and faces, sussing out when people are having a good day - or a bad one.

Last year his acts of relationship building paid off when a couple bequeathed $182,000 to the Trails West Branch.

"When the man passed away a few years ago, he wanted contributions to go to Trails West in lieu of flowers for his funeral," Momon explains. (The branch received several hundred dollars at the time.)

"And then, when she passed in 2011, we were one of 10 local institutions that received contributions from their estate."

Byron and Betty Widmier of Independence were big readers. Byron was a Trails West regular, checking out books and jazz and also using the collections and Library computers to do research for their many travels. Though Momon and his staff helped the Widmiers on a regular basis, they probably never envisioned reaping such dividends.

"It was for the service that we offer as a Library," Momon says. "That's something we did as a team."

Now he's poised to lead the staff at the Plaza Branch just as he did at Trails - by promoting a spirit of collegiality.

"When I went into Plaza Branch a week ago, I asked the staff if they were willing to train me. Most of them said yes," he laughs.

As for the community the Library serves, Ritchie's door will always be open.

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

Libraries don’t just open up books for young readers. We also open doors on potential futures, new friends, and better ways of living. (And sometimes we even have fun doing it, too.)

For the second year in a row, Medical Explorers, a partnership between the Kansas City Public Library and Truman Medical Centers, is helping Kansas City teens explore careers in medicine and learn how to make healthier choices in their daily lives.

Every Thursday in July, 47 teens from the Southeast, North-East, and L.H. Bluford Branches are coming together to explore careers in medicine by visiting local medical sites and connecting with health educators. Through a series of weekly field trips and two lock-ins, they will not only learn about jobs in medicine, they will also learn how to make healthier choices in their lives (whether it’s diet and nutrition or STDs) and have a blast getting to know other teens from across the city.

“Medical Explorers is unique in that it mixes fun with health and information,” says Mary Thompson, the Library’s Outreach Manager.

On a recent Thursday, the Explorers hit up the Kansas City Fire Department’s Ambulance Barn, where they climbed into ambulances, tried on gear, and talked with representatives from the fire and medic crews about what paths to take after high school to become first responders.

Next week, the Explorers will learn about more career options when they visit Penn Valley Metropolitan Community College’s Health and Science program, which includes an entire mock hospital, complete with simulation emergency and operating rooms.

And at the first lock-in, on July 27, the Explorers will spend the evening at Worlds of Fun, then head to the Tony Aguirre Community Center to participate in recreational activities, team challenges, and cooking demonstrations. Early Saturday morning, the Explorers will go on a scavenger hunt to buy a healthy breakfast from the vendors at City Market.

Other destinations include the KC Police crime lab and the Guadalupe Center's Culinary Institute.

After a summer’s worth of programs like these, we’ll be surprised if more than a few of our Medical Explorers don’t one day don a stethoscope and scrubs of their own.

Interested in joining?
To learn more about Medical Explorers and show interest in a summer 2013 edition, visit your local Kansas City Public Library location and talk to the teen librarian.

The Medical Explorers program is supported by a generous donation from Dr. and Mrs. Bipin and Rita Avashia.

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

In by far the biggest landslide of this entire literary All-Star extravaganza, Hannibal's own Samuel Clemens (better known to book-ball fans as Mark Twain) was chosen Off-the-Shelf coach.

But lest you think the contest for chief was a shutout, this final draft saw some of the most creative write-in voting of the entire series so far.

Yesterday morning, the Major League Librarian Selection Committee (a shadowy organization powered by Thai noodles and the smell of old books)*, took to Facebook and presented its official nominees for a Regional Author to coach OTSAS: Mark Twain, Langston Hughes, Jim Butcher, and Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Though Twain took an early lead, candidates rolled in from all corners of Kansas and Missouri. Here's the final ballot as it appeared on facebook.com/kclibrary this morning at the close of voting:

Though Twain prevailed by an out-of-the-park margin, the poetic Hughes garnered a respectable second place, write-in contestant Daniel Woodrell of the Ozark League came in third, and Independence hometown hero Butcher came in fourth.

And with that, our Literary Midsummer Classic closes.

Here's the final roster:

With Mark Twain leading the team, how could our Off-the-Shelfers lose?

After every good game, there's always plays to be discussed, outcomes to parse. So tell us: What did you think about the results? Any surprises? Disappointments?

Lastly, what would the team look like if you had designed it yourself? Post your All-Star selections in the comments.

We'll see you next time, friends. Keep your book bases loaded and swing for the fence.

*Big thanks to true Librarian All-Star Kaite Mediatore Stover for engineering much of the official roster.

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

The last time a write-in candidate made it to the MLB All-Star roster was in 1974. The Dodgers' first baseman Steve Garvey was elected by fans and went on to win MVP. The same could apply for Lisbeth Salander, the Off-the-Shelf All-Stars' fan-elected Femme Fatale Pitcher.

Pitcher: Lisbeth Salander

When we posted our official librarian-chosen nominations for Pitcher yesterday at noon (as we have each day since the Off-the-Shelf draft began on July 1), we offered up four Femme Fatale choices that had, we thought, the best mid-season stats of any ladies in the league: Scarlett O'Hara, Winter Santiago, Cathy Earnshaw, and Emma "Arsenic Arm" Bovary.

But apparently they weren't what the people wanted. When an unknown drafter wrote in Salander, aka The Girl With the Dragon Fastball, fans rallied, and Lis shot to the top of the ballot, garnering more votes than any other player in this entire draft. Coach Larsson would be proud. (Other great write-ins: Scout Finch, Amelia Bedelia, Amanda Wingfield, and Camille Preaker.)

What Regional Author should coach our literary All-Stars?

Now that we've got our players chosen -- and as the crowds head to the K for the big game tonight -- it's time to make our final choice: Coach.

For this honored position, who else could we appoint but someone from Kansas City's rich literary past? But just to make sure we get a rich field of heavyweights to choose from, we've extended the boundaries to the entire Kansas and Missouri region.

Check out our picks below, and if you don't like 'em, write in your own nominations for others to vote for -- just like you did for Lisbeth.

The voting begins now and ends Wednesday morning at 9 a.m.

Off-the-Shelf All-Star Coach: Regional Author

This team needs a hometown coach to set them on the path to the championship. What author from regional lit would you like to see in the dugout?

Vote now for Coach: Regional Author

Langston Hughes - Joplin, Mo.
Jim Butcher - Independence, Mo.
Laura Ingalls Wilder - Mansfield, Mo.
Mark Twain - Hannibal, Mo.

Vote now, and come back tomorrow to find out who won!

Our Off-the-Shelf team so far…

First Base (Fantasy Character): Professor Dumbledore, Harry Potter
Second Base (Famous Spy): Jason Bourne, The Bourne Identity
Shortstop (Kid Genius): Ender Wiggin, Ender’s Game
Third Base (American Hero): Calamity Jane, Buffalo Girls
Center Field (Teen Idol): Holden Caufield, The Catcher in the Rye
Left Field (Paranormal Being): Mr. Hyde, Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde
Right Field (Classic Adventurer): Tarzan, Tarzan of the Apes
Catcher (Famous Animal): Wilbur the pig, Charlotte’s Web
Pitcher (Femme Fatale): Lisbeth Salander, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
Coach (Regional Author): Vote now!

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

As Kansas City buzzed with All-Star game activity over the weekend, we got great help from our customers in choosing three more fictional players for our Off-the-Shelf All-Stars.

Now, we’re not sure whether Mr. Hyde, Tarzan, and Wilbur from Charlotte’s Web will take direction from our yet-to-be-named Coach, but they do make for an interesting lineup.

Off-the-Shelf Recap

If you’re just joining us, over the past week, we’ve been asking our fans on Facebook to vote for characters to play on our literary Off-the-Shelf All-Star team, on which each position is based on an archetypal character from a different genre of fiction. Every day, July 1-10 (leading up to the big game at the K), we’ve offered up four librarian-approved nominees for each base and allowed people to write in their own.

Before we get to voting for our second-to-last position, Pitcher, let’s meet the three new players who came in over the weekend.

Left Field (Paranormal Being): Mr. Hyde
Sneaking into deep left is Mr. Hyde, poisonous alter ego of the otherwise highly sportsmanlike Dr. Jekyll, outfielder for the Boston Dead Sox. Hyde bludgeoned his way past the vampiric likes of Lestat of Interview with the Vampire and pert Sookie Stackhouse of the Southern Vampire Mysteries and shattered the hopes (and skull) of newlydead Zombie Charlotte Lucas of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

Right Field (Classic Adventurer): Tarzan
It’s no country for young men in Right Field, and we needed a hero from the pages of classic fiction to grab fly fouls and make that long throw to home. Though it looked for a while like Dashiell Hammett’s star gumshoe Sam Spade would win the draft, Edgar Rice Burroughs fans rallied, electing Anaheim Apes outfielder Tarzan. Also on the ballot were Jack Schaefer’s Shane, pirate king Long John Silver, and write-ins Holden Caufield, Alice in Wonderland, and David Balfour.

Catcher (Famous Animal): Wilbur the pig
Trotting in from the pages of E.B. White to dig his hooves into the spot behind home plate is farm system upstart Wilbur the pig. A runt no longer, Wilbur got snapped up by OTS drafters over Arthur the aardvark, Bluebell the cow, Stellaluna the bat, and write-in candidate Owl of the Hundred Acre Wood nursery club.

It's time to draft a Femme Fatale Pitcher to make sweet chin music for the Off-the-Shelf All-Stars.

And now we’re in the home stretch, with only two positions left to go: Pitcher and Coach. The vote is already on for the former, a literary Femme Fatale, so head over to our Facebook page to vote your favorite or write in your own nomination (which several folks have already done). The draft for Pitcher ends at 9 a.m. Tuesday, July 10, and then at noon we’ll elect a Coach to lead this motley rabble of literary major leaguers.

Off-the-Shelf All-Star Pitcher: Femme Fatale

Who’s calling all the pitches, shaking off advice, and firing warning shots at cheeky batters? The dame on the mound! Pick a Femme Fatale to blaze the fastballs as Pitcher for the Off-the-Shelf Literary All-Stars!

Vote Now for Pitcher: Femme Fatale

Scarlett O’Hara - Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Winter Santiago - Coldest Winter Ever by Sister Souljah

Emma Bovary - Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

Catherine Earnshaw - Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Vote now, and come back tomorrow to help us pick a Coach!

Our Off-the-Shelf team so far…

First Base (Fantasy Character): Professor Dumbledore, Harry Potter
Second Base (Famous Spy): Jason Bourne, The Bourne Identity
Shortstop (Kid Genius): Ender Wiggin, Ender’s Game
Third Base (American Hero): Calamity Jane, Buffalo Girls
Center Field (Teen Idol): Holden Caufield, The Catcher in the Rye
Left Field (Paranormal Being): Mr. Hyde, Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde
Right Field (Classic Adventurer): Tarzan, Tarzan of the Apes
Catcher (Famous Animal): Wilbur the pig, Charlotte’s Web
Pitcher (TBA): Vote Now on Facebook!
Coach (TBA): Vote Tuesday, July 10

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

Holden Caufield always dreamed of being a catcher. Though this year's Off-the-Shelf All-Star voting won't find the incorrigible Caufield behind the plate, he'll have plenty of opportunity to field fly balls from Center Field. Find out who Holden beat for his coveted spot, and help us choose more fictional all-stars!

Center Fielder: Holden Caufield

In J.D. Salinger’s 1951 classic The Catcher in the Rye, 17-year-old Holden Caufield cuts a mopey, defiant figure as he wanders lonely on the streets of New York, contemplating existence and where he fits into it (or doesn’t). In many ways, Center Field is the perfect position for him. Holden can freely indulge his angst in the open expanses of the Outfield – he’d just better mind those deep fly balls.

Holden faced some tough competition in the voting that took place yesterday on the Library's Facebook page. Rookie Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games enjoyed the lead for most of the day, with Bella Swan of Twilight and Junior of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie bringing up the rear. But when the dust of teenage rebellion settled over the Outfield, Holden was our clear champ.

And we reckon Mr. Caufield will be right at home on an All-Star squad that has so far enlisted a wizard, a secret agent, a space-age boy genius, and an American frontierswoman. They’re a motley but powerful crew, and you picked them. Here are your 2012 Off-the-Shelf All-Stars so far:

Click for larger imageYour Off-the-Shelf All-Stars so far (Click to enlarge).

This weekend, we’ll need your help choosing three more positions: a Paranormal Being in Left Field, a Classic Adventurer in Right Field, and a Famous Animal from literature as Catcher. Voting will commence each day at noon and end the following morning at 9 a.m., on the Library’s Facebook page at facebook.com/kclibrary.

We’ll reveal our librarians’ nominees for Paranormal Left Fielder now and open the vote at noon sharp. Follow us on Facebook for the Right Field and Catcher choices over the weekend. On Monday, we’ll return with a blog re-cap.

To vote, just look for the multiple-choice question on our Wall and vote for one of our librarian-approved nominees or write in your own (click “Add an option”).

Off-the-Shelf All-Star Left Fielder: Paranormal Being

Left field is the perfect place for a character who’s out of this world. Who’s your pick for paranormal being in the outfield? Vote for one of the beastly bookballers above or nominate your own!

Vote for Left Field Nominees: Paranormal Being

Zombie Charlotte Lucas, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Jane Austen & Seth Grahame-Smith

Lestat, Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice

Sookie Stackhouse, The Southern Vampire Mysteries by Charlaine Harris

Mr. Hyde, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by R.L. Stevenson

Thanks for joining the Library in celebrating -- in an appropriately bookish way -- the arrival of the 2012 Major League Baseball All-Star Game in Kansas City on July 10!

May the best and/or deadest player win.

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

Image of Holden Caufield courtesy of Flickr user 50 Watts (Creative Commons)

‘Bout time we got a lady in the game! Straight from the pages of Larry McMurtry’s Buffalo Girls comes Calamity Jane, American frontierswoman and Off-the-Shelf All-Star Third Baseman. Once Jane’s warmed up, it’ll be time to pick a Teen Idol for Center Field!

Born in 1852 in Princeton, Missouri, Martha Jane Canary was a wild one. She was christened “Calamity Jane” during her time spent fighting Native Americans for the military and later became friends with Wild Bill Hickock in Deadwood. In McMurtry’s 1990 historic romp of a novel, an aging Calamity travels to London as part of Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show to perform for Queen Victoria.

Now, as the 2012 MLB All-Star Game hubbub ramps up in Kansas City, the Kansas City Public Library is proud to welcome Miss Jane as the first woman on our literary bookball team.

In the voting that took place yesterday on the KC Library Facebook page, Jane didn’t face very stiff competition from her fellow American legends vying for 3B: Doc Holliday (Doc by Mary Doria Russell), Ichabod Crane (“The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Washington Irving), and Sacajawea (Sacajawea by Anna Lee Waldo).

Fans rallied to Calamity from the beginning, and as the toughest bookballer this side of the Mississippi, Jane will test her reflexes in the “hot corner,” fielding grounders and gunning runners out for the OTS All-Stars. 

But now it’s time to shift gears to the outfield.

Off-the-Shelf Center Field: Teen Idol

The captain of the outfield assigns all the flyballs, watches every pitch, and has a great arm. Clearly, this is a job for a young ‘un. Which of these angsty teens from Young Adult fiction should be ruling the outfield?

Center Field: Teen Idol Nominees

Katniss Everdeen, The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

Holden Caufield, The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Bella Swan, Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

Arnold Spirit Jr., The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

Voting begins on our Facebook page at facebook.com/kclibrary starting today at noon through 9 a.m. tomorrow, July 6. Vote once for any of the young bucks above or feel free to write in your own nominee by clicking “Add an option.”

Vote on Facebook Now!

Vote for your Off-the-Shelf All-Star Center FielderWe need a smart and sassy YA hero for Center Field.

Here’s who’s been voted onto the team so far:

First Base (Fantasy Character): Professor Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
Second Base (Famous Spy): Jason Bourne, The Bourne Identity
Shortstop (Kid Genius): Ender Wiggin, Ender’s Game
Third Base (American Hero): Calamity Jane, Buffalo Girls
Center Field (Teen Idol): ???

We’ll be asking your help building our Off-the-Shelf team all the way through the MLB All-Star game at Kauffman Stadium on July 10. Keep the great interaction coming on Facebook, and follow the hashtag #OTSAS on Twitter for updates!

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

In our closest contest yet, Ender Wiggin won by a single vote to become the Kid Genius Shortstop on our Off-the-Shelf Literary All-Star Team. And as today is July 4, we’re asking your help choosing an American Hero or Heroine to cover Third Base.

Instant Replay:

As we rolled out of bed this Independence Day morning (a bit later than usual, as the Library is after all closed for the holiday) the Facebook vote was tied for the OTS team’s key defensive position: Kid Genius Shortstop.

Would it be Donald J. Sobol’s plucky neighborhood boy detective or Orson Scott Card’s interstellar schoolboy turned decorated space strategist?

Ender’s zero-g laser tag skills must have kicked in at the last minute, because a vote flew in for the interstellar prodigy just in time to end the heat before its 9 a.m. deadline. Wipe your eyes, Encyclopedia fans – there can be only one.

Elsewhere in the race, Harriet the Spy came in at second runner-up, followed by dreamy little Charles Wallace of A Wrinkle in Time. Teenage criminal mastermind Artemis Fowl made a surprise cameo as a write-in from All-Star recruiter Kim Carter. (Thanks, Kim!)

Now that Shortstop’s settled, it’s time to choose an All-Star All-American Third Baser to join Ender and previous winners Jason Bourne (2B) and Dumbledore (1B) on the Off-the-Shelf roster.

Off-the-Shelf Third Base: American Hero/Heroine

To hold down the “hot corner,” we need someone with a patriotic spirit and no fear of the bunt. Which character from American historical fiction (real or imagined) should be our Off-the-Shelf Third Base ballplayer?

Cast your vote on our Facebook page starting at 12 p.m. today through 9 a.m. tomorrow morning! The official nominees are…

Third Base: American Hero/Heroine

SacajaweaSacajawea by Anna Lee Waldo
Doc HollidayDoc by Mary Doria Russell
Calamity JaneBuffalo Girls by Larry McMurtry
Ichabod Crane – “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Washington Irving

Got a hero of your own? Nominate them in the slot where it says “Add an option.” We welcome any historical figure from a novel or a well-known fictional character from a novel or story with an American theme.

With Ender (played by Asa Butterfield) at Shortstop, we need a real American hero at Third.

Happy voting – and happy Independence Day! The Library will be open tomorrow starting at 9, when we’ll announce the winner and open the voting for our Center Fielder. By July 10, the day the MLB All-Star Game lands at Kauffman Stadium, we'll have our own team of fictional giants to rival those "real" boys of summer.

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

James Bond is the New York Yankees of bookball. He must be. Overexposure is surely the reason the world’s greatest pop-culture spy got fed to the sharks in the contest over Second Base on the Library’s Off-the-Shelf Literary All-Star Team.

Or maybe yesterday's Facebook voters wanted a younger, American spy. After all, second runner up – also trumping Bond – was John le Carre’s aging, bureaucratic MI6-er George Smiley of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy fame. And the poor old Pimpernel? He slumped into last place with 0 votes.

So it’s with open arms that we welcome Robert Ludlum’s whip-fast, young battering ram Jason Bourne (born: 1980) of The Bourne Identity & sequels as the spy who will come in from the cold to play Second Base.

Though he won’t have the swagger of 007 or sophistication of Smiley, Bourne will bring sheer a physical menace the other spies lack. You won’t see this second baseman skipping practice to seduce the other team’s sexy double-agent relief pitcher. Bourne means business. Let’s just hope his tendencies for amnesia don’t apply to the rules of bookball.

Off-the-Shelf Shortstop: Kid Genius

And now, who will accompany Famous Spy second baseman Bourne and first base Fantasy Character Dumbledore onto the infield as Shortstop for the OTS All-Stars?

There’s some short-fuse action at Shortstop. And we figure Kid Geniuses in literature see everything before it happens, including the pitch.

Which of these young brainiacs won’t let us down on the double-play? Cast your vote on our Facebook page starting at 12 p.m. today through 9 a.m. tomorrow morning!

Shortstop: Choose a Kid Genius!

Harriet, Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh

Charles Wallace, A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle

Encyclopedia Brown, Encyclopedia Brown, Boy Detective by Donald J. Sobol

Andrew “Ender” Wiggin, Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

Or, if you don't want to vote for any of these smarties, it's easy to nominate your own. Just click the "Add an option" box in the Facebook Question and type in your own. Others can vote on your pick, too.

Off-the-Shelf All-Stars fieldWhich Kid Genius from literature will direct the defense from Shortstop on our literary All-Star team?

We’ll be recruiting our Off-the-Shelf All-Stars every day until the "real" Major League All-Star game lands at Kauffman Stadium on July 10. Be sure to like our Facebook page and use Twitter hashtag #OTSAS to follow the bookball action!

But before you vote for Shortstop, tell us: Why do you think Bourne smashed the others (especially James B.) in the race for 2B?

About the Author

Jason Harper is the web content developer and social media manager at the Kansas City Public Library.
Kansas City Public Library on Facebook   Kansas City Public Library on Twitter   Kansas City Public Library on Flickr   Kansas City Public Library on YouTube   Follow KCLibrary on Pinterest   KC Unbound RSS feed

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