Library Life

hoopla digital

The Kansas City Public Library is offering a new, refreshingly quick — and free — way to get music, television shows, movies, and audiobooks.

Library patrons can now use Hoopla Digital to access an array of audio and video materials via Netflix-style streaming on their computers, tablets and smart phones. It's the latest addition to the Library's extensive menu of electronic resources.

All Hoopla content is available on demand. No holds necessary. No waiting. Users can watch or listen to their selections via online streaming or by temporarily downloading selections to a mobile device for viewing without an internet connection.

Hoopla's digital collection counts tens of thousands of titles - some 100,000 CDs; 10,000 audiobooks; 3,000 movies; and 500 TV series - and continues to expand. The Holland, Ohio-based service struck new streaming deals late in 2013 with NBCUniversal, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, National Geographic, and BBC America. It already had agreements with Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros. Entertainment, Universal Music Group, Warner Music Group, and eOne Music.

What’s the saying? One man’s trash is another’s treasure? Lucinda Adams recalls the day, five years ago, when she was led into a converted storage room in the old Kansas City Livestock Exchange building in the city’s West Bottoms.

Sharp Teeth

Looking for some chills and thrills this month? We have some suggestions for you! Our staff here at The Kansas City Public Library has picked some of their Halloween favorites.

New & Notable Collection

Looking for some instant literary gratification? New & Notable, a Kansas City Public Library collection and concept is now being piloted at the Central Library.

Redshirts by John Scalzi

September is upon us and fall is fast approaching, even if it doesn't feel like it outside. And being September, it means that we are overdue for another Staff Picks blog!

We have a little bit of everything with our picks this time around — Award-winning Science Fiction, True Crime, Modern Classics, and even Picture Books for our younger readers out there. These titles were all enjoyed by our staff, so why not give one a try?

Have you read something else lately you'd like to recommend to others? Feel free to add your own picks in the comments below!

 
 

True Grit by Charles Portis

The Sisters Brothers

We may have been busy with our Summer Reading Program the past few months, but your Library staff still found time to do their own reading! Here are just a few selections from our staff.

Zoo to You brought animal ambassadors from the Kansas City Zoo to the Library.

Hey kids! This summer you can get up close and personal with creatures like the barred tiger salamander (the state amphibian of Kansas) and the sugar glider (a tiny Australian marsupial related to the opossum).

In June and July curators and docents from the Kansas City Zoo are visiting branches of the Kansas City Public Library to make free presentations.

Children will learn about exotic animals from experts and get a chance to hold an ostrich egg and rub their fingers over the pelts of several animals.


[video:http://youtu.be/30Gk9YjxwYw]


Here's the list of upcoming Zoo to You events at the Library:

Sanda Day O'Connor

Over the last 6+ years, the Kansas City Public Library has sought to transform the way the people of greater Kansas City use libraries to stay informed about current events and learn more about landmark moments in history with an aggressive schedule of programs featuring scholars, authors, and public figures.

Pat Nichols

Lawrence bluesman Pat Nichols made some new fans this spring when he kicked off the Library’s ambitious America’s Music series at the Plaza Branch.

It was blues night, and Nichols began the evening by serenading patrons at the pre-event reception. Later he wowed the crowd with a display of picking on the National steel guitar.

Now Nichols has released a CD of performances, Blues from the Delta and Beyond, that was recorded earlier this year at producer Mike West’s recording studio in a former garage in Lawrence.

“Normally when you cut a record you pick the songs in advance and work on them during recording until you have them just right,” Nichols said.

“We did it differently. It was a lot like the early blues recordings in the 1920s and ‘30s where the producer would have these bluesmen perform a song two or three times and, later on, the record company would pick one version to release.”

Nichols said that over an 11-hour recording session he played a big chunk of his repertoire with virtually no advance planning.

As part of Preservation Week, we are highlighting one of the recent projects here at the Kansas City Public Library: the preservation of the Athenaeum Collection.

The collection, donated to the Library’s Missouri Valley Special Collections in July, 2012 by the Kansas City Athenaeum Board of Directors, includes the minutes, membership records, building blueprints, and photographs from the archives of this historic women’s organization.

The Athenaeum is the oldest active Kansas City women's club, founded in 1894. The history of the Athenaeum is closely tied with that of Kansas City, as its members campaigned for the betterment of our community. Over the years, the Athenaeum has been instrumental in advocating for women’s suffrage, juvenile court reforms, child labor laws, and educational reform.

The first Athenaeum president, Mary Harmon Weeks, was a leader in the public kindergarten movement and started the first Parent Teacher Association in Missouri. And Phoebe Jane Ess, a charter member and later president of the Athenaeum, guided the local women’s suffrage movement, also organizing the Susan B. Anthony Civic Club. Both of these organizations moved Jackson County toward becoming one of the first counties in Missouri to adopt women’s suffrage.

The Orphan Master's Son

The Pulitzer committee just announced the 2013 prize winners and finalists, and we are happy to say that their numbers include authors who have made recent appearances at the Kansas City Public Library.

Booketology 2013

It's hard to believe that it's already the end of Booketology. Our second annual Booketology tournament started with 64 literary characters from eight genres, each fighting for the title of Booketology Champion.

In celebration of National Library Week, we have compiled a list of books for all ages that highlight the value of libraries, librarians, and library workers.

 

Free for All: Oddballs, Geeks, and Gangstas in the Public Library
by Don Borchert

Don Borchert writes an unvarnished and entertaining account of his time working in a suburban L.A. public library system. Libraries are no longer the ivory towers full of dusty tomes and shushing ladies that people still expect, and Borchert provides a unique perspective on the role of the modern library and librarian.

 

The Night Bookmobile
by Audrey Niffenegger

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

And then there were two: The Booketology Championship has come down to a battle between two iconic literary figures: Huckleberry Finn and Harry Potter!

Vote now in the Booketology Championship! Voting will only be open for one day, April 8!

It was an amazing Elite 8 round for Booketology! Jane Marple fell to Huck Finn. In an upset, Princess Buttercup defeated Batman! Jane Austen’s heroine Elizabeth Bennet easily defeated the Hunger Games tribute Katniss Everdeen. And Harry Potter took the round against Marie Curie, with a 70 vote margin!

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