Local history

All Library locations will be closed on Monday, May 25 in observance of Memorial Day.

Local History

Video: What's on the Wornall House's Bookshelves?

In seeking ways to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War at his library, Plaza Branch Manager Joel Jones didn’t have to look far. There was a perfect partner just a few blocks away.

Local History

Exhibit Celebrates 100 Years of Iconic KC Landscape Designs

Most Kansas Citians have admired Hare & Hare’s work at one time or another. After all, the landscape architectural firm, now known as Ochsner Hare & Hare, just celebrated its 100th anniversary – a century spent reshaping and beautifying the area’s most iconic landscapes, such as the Country Club Plaza, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Liberty Memorial, Loose Park, Sunset Hill, and Mission Hills among them.

Local History

How the Irish Laid the Groundwork for Downtown Kansas City

The view north on Walnut from 3rd Street, 1868.

Though Kansas City’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade moved out of downtown several years ago, the historical imprint the Irish have left on our metropolitan landscape will never fade.

Local History

Winston Churchill in Missouri

Westminster College President Franc L. McCluer (far right) leads Harry S. Truman (far left) and Winston Churchill (center) on a tour of campus.

On March 5, 1946, Winston Churchill delivered one of the most significant speeches of the 20th century on the campus of Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. The famous “Sinews of Peace” speech, with its reference to Europe’s “iron curtain,” is still remembered 65 years later. But the trip proved costly for the former British prime minister – on the eve of his speech, Churchill nearly lost his shirt to President Harry S. Truman in a poker game.

Local History

New Biography of "Frontier Feminist" Clarina Howard Nichols to Be Discussed at the Library

In the years before the Civil War, Kansas was a battleground. As Free State forces clashed with pro-slavery marauders from Missouri, a 40-something mother of four from Vermont waged a war of her own. As “Bleeding Kansas” raged around her, Clarina Howard Nichols came into her own as a champion of equal rights for women and blacks.