Missouri Architecture

Local authors Cydney Millstein and Carol Grove discussed their new book Houses of Missouri, 1870-1940 on October 26 at the Plaza Branch. Explore the architecture of Missouri and the architects who worked here in these books and resources at the Library.

Missouri Architecture | Architects | Other Resources

Missouri Architecture

Houses of Missouri, 1870-1940
By Cydney Millstein and Carol Grove
With over 300 images and illustrations, this book provides a tour of 45 historic houses in Missouri. These include Oak Hill, William Rockhill Nelson’s mansion; Greystone, Major Emory Foster’s home in Pevely; and more.

Kansas City Then & Now book jacket

Kansas City Then & Now
By Darlene Isaacson
Seventy-nine pairs of photographs illustrate then-and-now images of popular locations like the Harry S. Truman Residence, the Hannibal Bridge, and the Coates House Hotel.

Kansas City, Missouri: An Architectural History, 1826-1990
By George Ehrlich
With over 200 illustrations, Ehrlich presents a comprehensive history of architecture in Kansas City. Organized chronologically by time period, this book also discusses the social and cultural contexts surrounding the architecture.

The American Institute of Architects Guide to Kansas City Architecture & Public Art
This driving tour guidebook covers the greater Kansas City area and features over 300 buildings and structures from 1850 to the present. Organized geographically, it includes a brief description of each structure, architect, builder, address, and date of construction.

Bold Expansion book jacket

Bold Expansion: The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art Bloch Building
By Toni Wood and Ann Slegman
The construction of the Bloch Building represents one part of a total transformation of the Nelson-Atkins. This book is intended to celebrate this moment in the museum's history, with a look at how the institution arrived at this period of change.

St. Louis Lost
By Mary Bartley
With over 100 images, this book explores the historic buildings of St. Louis that no longer exist and the people involved in those projects.

Kansas City Style: A Social and Cultural History of Kansas City As Seen Through Its Lost Architecture
By Dory DeAngelo, Jane Fifield Flynn
The authors discuss many Kansas City structures that are no longer standing in this well illustrated book. It also includes biographical information for many of the architects.

Architects

Edward W. Tanner, Architect
By Charles and Mary Baer
Well known for his work with the J.C. Nichols Company, Edward Tanner was the architect for the Country Club Plaza. This book covers his work in the Kansas City area and includes many photographs.

Stalking Louis Curtiss, Architect: A Portrait of the Man and His Work
By Wilda Sandy
Learn more about the life and career of this innovative architect who worked in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and designed many buildings in Kansas City.

William Adair Bernoudy, Architect: Bringing the Legacy of Frank Lloyd Wright to St. Louis
By Osmund Overby
Illustrated with more than 280 photographs and 29 floor plans, this book is an exploration of the work of William Adair Bernoudy. A leading advocate of Frank Lloyd Wright's modern organic architecture, Bernoudy was best known for his skill in designing houses that harmonized with the local environment and terrain. He was the creator of more than one hundred new structures and played a vital rote in the architecture of St. Louis and the surrounding area.

Other Resources

Kansas City Architecture
Discover more resources on architecture in the Kansas City area in this resource guide provided by the Missouri Valley Special Collections.

Kansas City Architecture Digital Gallery
These digitized images from the Missouri Valley Special Collections include photographs of significant buildings in Kansas City, including homes, banks, hotels, theaters, churches, hospitals, and much more.

Some book descriptions provided by BookLetters.

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