C-SPAN Videos

C-SPAN, the cable television network, has visited the Library to record events for Book TV and other series. Click the icon to go to the C-SPAN Video Library to watch these events (requires Adobe Flash Player).

  • Author Margot McMillen explores how a protest by thousands of women at the 1916 Democratic National Convention in St. Louis helped making voting rights for women a reality.
    Thursday, August 23, 2012

    Margot McMillen, author of The Golden Lane, explores how a protest by thousands of women at the 1916 Democratic National Convention in St. Louis changed minds and helped make voting rights for women a reality. Her presentation coincides with Women’s Empowerment Week.

    McMillen is an adjunct instructor of English at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, and farms in rural Callaway County.

  • Author Brandon G. Kinney explores the complex series of events that led to Missouri’s brief but bloody Mormon War of 1838, a conflict over religion, ideology, and land.
    Sunday, June 24, 2012

    Author Brandon G. Kinney explores the complex series of events that led to the brief but bloody Mormon War of 1838, a conflict over religion, ideology, and land pitting Joseph Smith and his Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints against other Missouri residents, the governor, and the state militia.

    Kinney is a graduate of the Creighton University School of Law and practices law in Butler, Missouri. He is the author of The Mormon War: Zion and the Missouri Extermination Order of 1838.

  • When her husband, President Woodrow Wilson, suffered a stroke in 1919, did Edith Wilson control the reins of power to become, in effect, our first woman president?
    Thursday, June 21, 2012

    Flamboyant, confident, and controversial, Edith Bolling Wilson was not your traditional First Lady. After her husband, Woodrow Wilson, suffered a debilitating stroke in 1919, she took the reins of government and acted on behalf of her ailing spouse. Historian Kristie Miller looks into the life of the woman known as “Madame Regent” and “the Assistant President” and asks: Was Edith Wilson, in effect, our first woman president?

  • Author Max Holland delves into the mystery of Mark Felt, the FBI official who as the legendary “Deep Throat” helped bring down the presidency of Richard Nixon.
    Monday, June 18, 2012

    Author Max Holland delves into the enigma that is Mark Felt (1913-2008), the FBI official who as the mysterious Deep Throat shared with reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein insider information on the Watergate scandal and by doing so helped to bring down President Richard Nixon.

  • Historian Robert Rydell examines how world’s fairs inspired and promoted innovations in architecture, the arts, science, technology, and consumer culture.
    Wednesday, June 6, 2012

    Historian Robert Rydell describes how world’s fairs inspired and promoted innovations in architecture, the arts, music, science, and technology, not to mention consumer culture and mass entertainment. His presentation complements the exhibit Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs, 1851-1939 currently on display at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

  • Bon vivant Chester Alan Arthur was propelled into the presidency by an assassination and then defied the federal patronage system that had nurtured him.
    Wednesday, May 23, 2012

    Author Zachary Karabell examines Chester Alan Arthur, who was propelled into the presidency by the assassination of James Garfield and turned his back on the patronage system that had nurtured him.

  • The first vice president to assume the presidency on the death of an incumbent, John Tyler was called “His Accidency,” but historian Edward P. Crapol sees a bold leader who enhanced presidential power.
    Wednesday, April 11, 2012

    The first vice president to occupy the White House after the death of the incumbent, John Tyler was derided by critics as “His Accidency.” Yet historian Edward P. Crapol depicts Tyler as a bold leader who used the malleable executive system to his advantage and enhanced presidential power.

    Crapol, author of John Tyler: The Accidental President, is the William E. Pullen professor of American history, emeritus, at the College of William and Mary.

  • Author Philip White examines Churchill’s 1946 address at Fulton, Missouri, and explains how it alerted a war-weary West to Communism’s growing control of Eastern Europe.
    Wednesday, March 7, 2012

    Winston Churchill’s 1946 speech at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, warned that Communism was on the march. Historian Philip White relates how the address – encouraged and attended by Harry S. Truman – was met with skepticism but came to be seen as a Cold War prophecy.

  • University of Pennsylvania historian Stephanie McCurry contends the South sowed the seeds of its demise in creating a regime that excluded white women and slaves, which together comprised a majority of the population.
    Thursday, January 26, 2012

    University of Pennsylvania historian Stephanie McCurry offers a new interpretation of the Confederacy that contends the South sowed the seeds of its demise in creating a regime that excluded white women and slaves, which together comprised a majority of the population.

    Confederate Reckoning was a finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for History. McCurry’s talk is the keynote address for the Richard D. McKinzie Research Symposium.

    Co-sponsored by the University of Missouri-Kansas City Department of History.

  • Biographer David O. Stewart discusses his new portrait of  Aaron Burr – America’s third vice president and one of the most daring, and possibly deluded, figures in our nation’s history.
    Thursday, November 3, 2011

    Historian and constitutional lawyer David Stewart discusses his new biography of Aaron Burr – America’s third vice president and one of the most daring, and possibly deluded, figures in our nation’s history.