Event Archive

Search our archive of past events at the Library! You can search by keyword - such as event title, subject, or presenter name - or by a date range. To search for an exact phrase, put it in quotation marks. If you know the specific date of an event, enter the same date in both fields. Search results will only show events that match ALL entered terms.

Format: 2014-09-18
Format: 2014-09-18
  • Stuart Davies, director of the Smithsonian Institution’s Global Earth Observatories project, addresses the importance of healthy forests – our planet’s lungs – in the latest installment of a series of talks by Smithsonian scientists.
    Thursday, August 28, 2014

    Forests produce lumber, shelter a dazzling variety of plant and animal life, and serve as our planet’s lungs, cleansing the atmosphere of carbon dioxide. But we’re losing them at an alarming rate.

    The Smithsonian Institution’s Stuart Davies addresses their importance to the overall health of our planet in the third installment of Conserving Our Dynamic Planet, a series featuring talks by Smithsonian scientists and co-presented by the Linda Hall Library.

    Davies, a tropical ecologist with 22 years of experience working throughout the tropics, is director of the Smithsonian’s Center for Tropical Forest Science.

  • Historian Adrian Goldsworthy discusses his highly anticipated biography of the founder of the Roman Empire and man for whom the month of August is named – a consummate manipulator, propagandist, and risk-taking showman who begot stability and peace.
    Wednesday, August 27, 2014

    Two thousand years after his death, the story of the founder of the Roman Empire is one of the most riveting in western history. Caesar Augustus evolved from an entitled teenager – heir of the murdered Julius Caesar – to a skillful politician and servant of the state who brought stability and peace to Rome and created a new, emperor-run system of government.

    Adrian Goldsworthy, a leading ancient historian, examines the man for whom the month of August is named in a discussion of his highly anticipated biography, Augustus: First Emperor of Rome. He digs beneath the myths, revealing the Augustus who was a consummate manipulator, propagandist, and showman, both generous and ruthless.

    The author of earlier biographies of Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra, among many other books, Goldsworthy is a frequent lecturer and consultant on historical documentaries produced by the History Channel, National Geographic, and the BBC.

  • Twenty-three years after memorably accusing Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment, Anita Hill visits the Library for the screening of a documentary chronicling that historic event. Following the film, she will take audience questions.
    Tuesday, August 26, 2014

    Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St.

    Twenty-three years after she riveted a nation – sitting before a microphone in a bright blue suit, calmly telling an all-male Senate committee that she once was subjected to sexual harassment by Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas – Anita Hill will appear at a Kansas City Public Library event commemorating that historic event.

  • Best-selling author Frank Schaeffer doesn’t unequivocally believe in God. But moved in part by the love for his children and grandchildren, he prays every day. In a discussion of his latest book he asks: What’s wrong with that paradox?
    Thursday, August 21, 2014

    Caught between the beauty of his grandchildren and grief over a friend’s death, Frank Schaeffer found himself simultaneously not believing and believing in a higher power – an atheist turning to prayer.

    The bestselling author examines that conflict in a discussion of his latest book, Why I Am an Atheist Who Believes in God. Schaeffer casts himself as an imperfect son, husband, and grandfather whose love of family and art trump the ugly theologies of an angry God and the atheist’s vision of a cold, meaningless universe.

  • Former State Department and CIA intelligence analyst Mark Stout discusses the birth of modern American espionage during World War I, from aerial reconnaissance and battlefield code-breaking to the search for spies and saboteurs back home in the States.
    Wednesday, August 20, 2014

    The vast U.S. intelligence operations of today have their roots in World War I, when the Army flew aerial photography missions and cracked German codes and the State Department carried out its own daring espionage missions. Back home, the military and Justice Department worked to secure the nation against spies and saboteurs – real and imaginary.

    Mark Stout, who worked for 13 years as an intelligence analyst with the State Department and CIA, examines this little-known period in American history and its lasting impact.

    Stout currently is director of Johns Hopkins University’s Global Security master’s program. He spent three years as historian at the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C.

  • Carl Weber continues the first season of the Library’s urban fiction series with a discussion of his sequel to the best-selling The Choir Director, further following the career and challenging personal life of title character Aaron Mackie.
    Tuesday, August 19, 2014

    The behind-the-scenes lives of African American clergymen and their families make up a major sub-genre of contemporary urban fiction. To date, most of these novels have been written by women.

    Author Carl Weber offers a male point of view in books such as The Choir Director. In his latest novel, a sequel to that bestseller, title character Aaron Mackie’s nationally renowned success has him in line for a huge recording contract. But his private life comes crashing down when his fiancé leaves him at the altar with no explanation, and Mackie turns to his mentor, Bishop T.K. Wilson, for help. Unfortunately, the line Mackie asks him to cross will force the bishop to choose between friendship and faith.

  • Historian Petra DeWitt examines the suspicions and hostilities faced by Missouri’s sizable German American population during World War I, including questions about loyalty and an effort to ban the German language in the state.
    Sunday, August 17, 2014

    How do you prove that you are a true American? Especially if you’re of German descent and your country is engaged in a desperate struggle with your ancestors’ homeland?

    Historian Petra DeWitt explores the dilemma of German Americans who, at the time of World War I, made up one of the largest and most prosperous ethnic groups in Missouri. But with America’s involvement in the war, the loyalty of those citizens often was called into question and they endured government attacks on their culture and history – including an effort to ban the German language in Missouri.

  • Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art Director Julian Zugazagoitia discusses the ways in which art can be a manifestation of the human spirit and experience. The event marks the opening of a new Library book collection, The Human Spirit, housed at the Plaza Branch.
    Sunday, August 17, 2014

    The Kansas City Public Library and Cultural Crossroads will mark the opening of a new collection – The Human Spirit – with a presentation by Julian Zugazagoitia, director of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

    Zugazagoitia’s talk, Art of the Human Spirit, addresses the ways in which art can be a manifestation of the human spirit and human experience.

    The Human Spirit Collection features more than 140 books intended to enhance understanding and mutual respect among the diverse faiths, traditions, and cultures within the greater Kansas City community. It provides a central repository of multicultural and interfaith materials for educators and the public at large.

  • This summer’s Off-the-Wall film series features music-heavy titles from 1984. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs and enjoy a movie under the stars on the Rooftop Terrace.
    Friday, August 15, 2014

    The 2014 edition of the long-running Off-the-Wall Film Series, co-presented by The Kansas City Public Library and The Pitch, features musically-themed titles from 1984.

    In Repo Man, Young Otto (Emilio Estevez) gets a crash course in repossessing cars from old hand Harry Dean Stanton in this cult effort that mixes anti-social rebellion with black comedy and even a dab of science fiction. Director Alex Cox’s film isn’t technically a musical, but it has a killer soundtrack featuring Iggy Pop, Black Flag, Suicidal Tendencies, the Circle Jerks, and other bands your mother wouldn’t approve of. This title is Rated R and is recommended for adult audiences only.

    These five films, presented on one Friday each month from May through September on the Rooftop Terrace of the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., offer a tuneful sampling of what Americans were listening to 30 years ago. Featured are such musical artists as Prince and the Talking Heads, an early cinematic celebration of break dancing, and a classic cult film noted for its innovative musical soundtrack.

  • Decorated Kansas City magician Eric Vaughn delivers an interactive, enthusiastic – and just plain wacky – performance that keeps audiences simultaneously laughing and scratching their heads.  Appropriate for all ages.
    Friday, August 15, 2014

    Prepare to be amazed. Eric Vaughn – Kansas City’s Magician of the Year in 2000 – delivers a wacky, enthusiastic, interactive performance that keeps audiences laughing and scratching their heads at the same time. Appropriate for all ages.