Event Archive

Search our archive of past events at the Library! You can search by keyword - such as event title, subject, or presenter name - or by a date range. To search for an exact phrase, put it in quotation marks. If you know the specific date of an event, enter the same date in both fields. Search results will only show events that match ALL entered terms.

Format: 2016-08-27
Format: 2016-08-27
  • The Library and American Public Square continue their series of discussions of hot-button issues, examining tax and other financial incentives designed to encourage and promote economic development. Those gains, though, often come at  the expense of others.
    Wednesday, May 11, 2016

    Incentives of various types are widely offered to encourage and promote economic development – a point of competition and controversy in a years-long “border war” between Missouri and Kansas.

  • David Aamodt and Richard Edwards of the National Frontier Trails Museum in Independence examine the Santa Fe Trail from the Mexican perspective. Immigrants who made their way up the commercial corridor eventually outnumbered Americans traveling the other way.
    Tuesday, May 10, 2016

    The Santa Fe Trail was best known as a commercial route from Independence, Missouri, to Santa Fe, New Mexico. But while Americans called it “the road to Santa Fe,” Mexicans knew it as “el Camino a los Estados Unidos” – the road to the United States. Immigrants making their way up the corridor eventually outnumbered Americans coming the other way.

  • Ambassador Dennis Ross, who has been directly involved in steering American policy on the Middle East for nearly 30 years, examines the close, U.S.-Israeli relationship through every presidential administration from Truman’s to Obama’s.
    Monday, May 9, 2016

    U.S. policy on Israel has always emphasized the unbreakable bond between the two countries and America’s strong commitment to Israeli security. Their ties are so close today that, when differences arise, they tend to make news. But that wasn’t always the case.

  • In conjunction with Planet Comicon, KC’s largest pop culture and comic book convention, scheduled for May 20-22 at Bartle Hall, the Library screens four favorite adaptations of comic books – each packed with action and quirk.
    Saturday, May 7, 2016

    In conjunction with Planet Comicon, Kansas City’s largest pop culture and comic book convention, scheduled for May 20-22 at Bartle Hall, the Library screens four of our favorite adaptations of comic books – each packed with action and quirk.

  • The Kansas City Public Library joins other libraries nationwide in celebrating the world of comic books, giving away hundreds of free comics at all 10 Library locations. It’s first come-first served.  Free Comic Book Day is observed annually the first Saturday in May.
    Saturday, May 7, 2016

    The Kansas City Public Library joins other libraries nationwide in celebrating the world of comic books, giving away hundreds of free comics at all 10 Library locations. It’s first come, first served.

    Free Comic Book Day is observed annually the first Saturday in May.

  • Students from Community School #1 perform poems and songs from the album Free to Be … You and Me, compiled by Marlo Thomas in 1972.   Appropriate for all ages.
    Friday, May 6, 2016

    Students from Community School #1 perform poems and songs from the album Free to Be…You and Me, compiled by Marlo Thomas in 1972. This empowering event encourages children to think about endless possibilities and unleash their creativity.

  • Part of a lauded PBS documentary series, Empire of Dreams covers the period from 1880-1942 when immigrated Latinos began building strong communities in our country. The episode is screened, and the University of Kansas’ Ruben Flores and Christina Bejarano lead a subsequent discussion.
    Thursday, May 5, 2016

    The PBS documentary series Latino Americans: The 500 Year Legacy That Reshaped a Nation chronicles the rich history and experiences of Latinos in the U.S. The Library screens the episode Empire of Dreams, covering the period from 1880-1942, when an influx of newly immigrated Cubans, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans began arriving and building strong communities in our country.

  • Author Mark Zwonitzer discusses his new book The Statesman and the Storyteller: John Hay, Mark Twain, and the Rise of American Imperialism, which examines the relationship between the Lincoln confidant and the great, Missouri-born writer.
    Thursday, May 5, 2016

    John Hay and Samuel Clemens grew up some 50 miles apart along the Mississippi River and became acquainted early in their respective careers – Hay as private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln, Clemens as a writer who would gain fame as Mark Twain.

  • Andrea Wulf discusses her book about adventurous, 19th-century explorer and naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, whose discoveries changed the way we see the natural world, ushering in modern environmentalism.
    Wednesday, May 4, 2016

    Alexander von Humboldt was, in his time, one of the most interesting men in the world.

    The 19th-century explorer and naturalist climbed volcanoes and raced through anthrax-infested Siberia, and his scientific discoveries changed the way we see the natural world. He noted similarities between climate zones across the world and predicted human-induced climate change, ushering in modern environmentalism.

  • Pastor Adam Hamilton, founder of Kansas City’s expansive Church of the Resurrection and appointee to President Obama’s Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, participates in a public conversation with Library Director Crosby Kemper III.
    Tuesday, May 3, 2016

    From modest attendance of 120 at its first service held in 1990 in the chapel of a local funeral home – the Rev. Adam Hamilton has nurtured Kansas City’s Church of the Resurrection into the largest United Methodist church in the nation, serving more than 20,000 members across four campuses. It expects to open a new, visually striking, $90 million sanctuary in Leawood, Kansas, by next Easter.

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