Event Archive

Search our archive of past events at the Library! You can search by keyword - such as event title, subject, or presenter name - or by a date range. To search for an exact phrase, put it in quotation marks. If you know the specific date of an event, enter the same date in both fields. Search results will only show events that match ALL entered terms.

Format: 2016-05-03
Format: 2016-05-03
  • A summer of must-see cinema that curated by Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Roger Ebert, exclusively for the Kansas City Public Library.  The Cell (2000)
    Friday, May 20, 2011

    The Off-the-Wall Film Series returns with a selection cult films that have passed the critical muster of Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Roger Ebert, who has curated this summer of must-see cinema exclusively for the Kansas City Public Library.

  • Two-time National Magazine Award winner Stephen Fried presents the extraordinary saga of Fred Harvey, a man whose life, entrepreneurial spirit, innovation, hard work, and resilience – let alone his Harvey Houses and Harvey Girls – have become the stuff of legend.
    Thursday, May 19, 2011

    As much an American success story as a story about America itself, the saga of Fred Harvey and the Harvey Houses is a captivating tale of entrepreneurial innovation, hard work, and resilience that left an indelible mark on our nation’s culture and history. To a surprising degree, we still live in an America of Fred Harvey’s making. But just who was Fred Harvey?

  • Kief Schladweiler from the Foundation Center in New York hosts two workshops intended to help not-for-profit groups and individual grant seekers find additional revenue sources.
    Wednesday, May 18, 2011

    Kief Schladweiler from the Foundation Center in New York hosts two workshops intended to help not-for-profit groups and individual grant seekers find additional revenue sources on Wednesday, May 18, 2011.

  • Wednesday, May 18, 2011

    Kief Schladweiler from the Foundation Center in New York hosts two workshops intended to help not-for-profit groups and individual grant seekers find additional revenue sources on Wednesday, May 18, 2011.

  • Robert Rydell discusses the Depression-era World’s Fairs that gave hope to millions and offered visions of future progress.
    Tuesday, May 17, 2011

    The World’s Fairs that took place in the United States during the Great Depression of the 1930s gave hope to millions and offered visions of future progress. These grand expositions showcased an optimistic, consumerist future.

  • Award-winning author Mariko Nagai discusses her new collection of short stories based on Japanese folk tales and history.
    Monday, May 16, 2011

    Award-winning author Mariko Nagai shares the sources of inspiration for her new book, Georgic: Stories, including Japanese folk tales and history.

  • Jorge Climaco, a native of the Mexican state of Oaxaca who now lives in the Kansas City area, presents a family program on the beloved Zapotec folk story.
    Monday, May 16, 2011

    Jorge Climaco, a native of the Mexican state of Oaxaca who now lives in the Kansas City area, presents a family program on the beloved Zapotec folk story, The Rabbit and the Coyote. Using slides of illustrations by Francisco Toledo, the most important contemporary living artist in Mexico, Climaco tells the tale of how the rabbit outsmarted the coyote – which is why coyotes always look up at the moon.

  • Author Bonar Menninger discusses his new book about the massive EF-5 tornado that on June 8, 1966, cut a 22-mile swath across eastern Kansas before smashing through Topeka.
    Sunday, May 15, 2011

    On June 8, 1966, a massive EF-5 tornado cut a 22-mile swath across eastern Kansas before smashing through Topeka.

    Author Bonar Menninger recounts the events of that tragic day in his new book, And Hell Followed With It, for which he interviewed dozens of survivors to construct a tightly woven narrative that conveys in gut-wrenching detail what it’s like when nature careens out of control.

  • In association with the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, re-enactors and historians take a stroll through the 1860s wearing clothing of the free and enslaved, civilian and military, North and South.
    Sunday, May 15, 2011

    In association with the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, re-enactors and historians will participate in an 1860s-themed fashion show. The will wear clothing of the free and enslaved, civilian and military, North and South. Kandice Walker, director of the John Wornall House, joins with other experts to discuss the significance of the apparel.

  • Jorge Climaco, a native of the Mexican state of Oaxaca who now lives in the Kansas City area, presents a family program on the beloved Zapotec folk story.
    Saturday, May 14, 2011

    Jorge Climaco, a native of the Mexican state of Oaxaca who now lives in the Kansas City area, presents a family program on the beloved Zapotec folk story, The Rabbit and the Coyote. Using slides of illustrations by Francisco Toledo, the most important contemporary living artist in Mexico, Climaco tells the tale of how the rabbit outsmarted the coyote – which is why coyotes always look up at the moon.

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