Event Archive

Search our archive of past events at the Library! You can search by keyword - such as event title, subject, or presenter name - or by a date range. To search for an exact phrase, put it in quotation marks. If you know the specific date of an event, enter the same date in both fields. Search results will only show events that match ALL entered terms.

Format: 2014-04-23
Format: 2014-04-23
  • Enjoy an evening of traditional and contemporary folk songs as Adam Miller performs his Singing Through History program. Appropriate for all ages.
    Friday, September 6, 2013

    Enjoy an evening of traditional and contemporary folk songs as Adam Miller performs his Singing Through History program. Miller is one of the premier autoharpists in the world and a natural-born American folksinger and storyteller. His performances at festivals and concert halls across the United States have won him fans of all ages. Miller is masterful entertainer who never fails to get his audience singing along.

    Admission is free. Appropriate for all ages.

  • Chicana writer Norma Cantú discusses her new book Canicula: Snapshots of a Girlhood en la Frontera, in which she chronicles life on the U.S.-Mexico border.
    Thursday, September 5, 2013

    Writer Norma Cantú, internationally known scholar of Latino and Chicano literature and studies, reads from her book Canicula: Snapshots of a Girlhood en la Frontera, a chronicle of life on the U.S.-Mexico border. She will also read from her poetry book manuscript Meditacion Fronteriza/Borderlands Meditation and from her novel-in-progress, tentatively titled Champú or Hair Matters.

    Formerly a professor of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio, Cantú recently joined the UMKC Department of English and the Latina/Latino Studies Program. Her areas of interest and research include border studies, cultural studies, feminist studies, and folklore.

  • Editors Jonathan Earle and Diane Mutti Burke and three fellow historians who contributed to their book -- Kristen Oertel, Jeremy Neely, and Jennifer Weber – discuss the era of Bleeding Kansas, its overall impact on the Civil War, and the lasting divisiveness it spawned.
    Tuesday, September 3, 2013

    Long before the Civil War began violence was commonplace along the Missouri-Kansas border. There a recurring cycle of robbery, arson, torture, murder, and revenge was established over the same issues that would fuel the larger conflict.

    Jonathan Earle, associate professor of history at the University of Kansas, and Diane Mutti Burke, associate professor of history at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, are editors of the new book Bleeding Kansas, Bleeding Missouri. They are joined by contributing writers Kristen Oertel of the University of Tulsa, Jennifer Weber of the University of Kansas, and Jeremy Neely of Missouri State University for a discussion that blends political, military, social, and intellectual history to explain why the region’s divisiveness was so bitter and persisted for so long.

  • Political scientist Carolyn N. Long examines the Warren Court decision that decided evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment could not be used in state criminal law prosecutions.
    Thursday, August 29, 2013

    When police in Ohio raided Dollree Mapp’s home looking for evidence in a bombing, all they found were some “lascivious books.” Mapp appealed her pornography conviction, leading the Supreme Court under Earl Warren to address not only the search-and-seizure question but also the “exclusionary rule” concerning the use of evidence not specified in a search warrant.

    Carolyn N. Long is associate professor of political science at Washington State University – Vancouver.

  • Thursday, August 29, 2013

    Programs and a traveling exhibit from the Metropolitan Community College’s Business and Technology Campus explore how to land in-demand “gold collar” jobs – electric utility lineman, computer-controlled machine programmer, welder/fabricator, environmental engineering technician – with just an associate’s degree or less.

    The programs – 10 Gold Collar Jobs in KC and 10 Things that Get You Hired and 10 Things that Get You Fired – will be presented throughout the summer and fall at several Library locations.

  • Author Kirstin Downey discusses her book about FDR’s Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins who implemented the forty-hour work week, child labor laws, Social Security, unemployment compensation, and other essential New Deal programs.
    Wednesday, August 28, 2013

    She is no longer a household name, but during Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration Frances Perkins was one of America’s most influential women. As the first female secretary of labor she was responsible for implementing programs that reshaped society and business and established the social safety net we enjoy today.

    Biographer Kirstin Downey examines Perkins’ life and enduring impact in a discussion of her book The Woman Behind the New Deal: The Life and Legacy of Frances Perkins – Social Security, Unemployment Insurance, and the Minimum Wage.

  • Architects Steve McDowell and Rick Schladweiler and Kansas City Ballet Executive Director Jeffrey Bentley explore how the century-old Union Station Power House Building was transformed into the award-winning Todd Bolender Center for Dance and Creativity.
    Sunday, August 25, 2013

    Steve McDowell and Rick Schladweiler of the architectural firm BNIM and Kansas City Ballet Executive Director Jeffrey Bentley explore how the century-old Union Station Power House Building was transformed into the award-winning Todd Bolender Center for Dance and Creativity.

    The 2013 Kansas City Architecture Series examines how historic buildings in Kansas City’s downtown area have been repurposed and given new life.

  • Former Kansas City Star columnist Steve Penn discusses his new book about Pete O’Neal, the leader of the Kansas City Black Panthers who was convicted on a weapons charge, fled to Africa and during four decades in exile has become an honored community leader in Tanzania.
    Friday, August 23, 2013

    Former Kansas City Star columnist Steve Penn joins U.S. Representative Emanuel Cleaver II for a discussion of Penn’s new book Case for a Pardon: The Pete O’Neal Story.

    In 1970 Kansas City Black Panther leader O’Neal – facing a four-year jail sentence after his conviction on a weapons charge – fled to Africa. In his more than four decades of exile in Tanzania, O’Neal has become a force for progress. He is a founder of the United African Alliance Community Center, which provides the community with free art, music, film, and educational opportunities.

  • Scott Miller of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum examines the fates of the nearly 1,000 Jewish refugees who in 1937 fled Nazi Germany on the ship St. Louis but were returned to Europe after Cuba, the U.S., and Canada denied them refuge.
    Thursday, August 22, 2013

    In 1937 the German ocean liner St. Louis set sail from Hamburg to Cuba. Aboard were nearly 1,000 Jews hoping to escape the Nazis. But midway across the Atlantic their visas were revoked. First Cuba, then the United States and Canada, refused to take the refugees, who were returned to Europe.

    Scott Miller of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum reveals the varied fates of the 937 refugees aboard the St. Louis, following the clues through archives in Havana, Europe, Israel, and the U.S., and through New York City neighborhoods to track down leads provided by friends, family members, and others who knew these passengers.

  • On the 150th anniversary of Quantrill’s raid on Lawrence, Kansas, historian Tony R. Mullis of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth examines the notorious massacre and the years of back-and-forth atrocities that led up to it.
    Wednesday, August 21, 2013

    On the 150th anniversary of William Clarke Quantrill’s raid on Lawrence, Tony R. Mullis of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, examines the notorious massacre and the years of back-and-forth atrocities by Confederate bushwackers and pro-Union Jayhawkers that led up to it.

    Mullis is a retired lieutenant colonel in the United States Air Force and the author of Peacekeeping on the Plains: Army Operations in Bleeding Kansas.