Event Archive

Search our archive of past events at the Library! You can search by keyword - such as event title, subject, or presenter name - or by a date range. To search for an exact phrase, put it in quotation marks. If you know the specific date of an event, enter the same date in both fields. Search results will only show events that match ALL entered terms.

Format: 2014-10-24
Format: 2014-10-24
  • The annual Searching the Psyche Through Cinema film screening and discussion series returns for an examination of the cinema of the “Master of Suspense,” Alfred Hitchcock.  The Birds (1963; NR)
    Sunday, February 23, 2014

    A free series of films by Alfred Hitchcock who used film to explore his own neuroses and phobias, in the process revealing the psychological complexities we all share.

    The birds of the air begin attacking humanity … but that’s just one of the horrors in this disturbing depiction of madness and sexuality. Hitchcock’s new find Tippi Hedren (the director was obsessed with her) and Rod Taylor play a couple whose growing love must contend not only with a rampaging Mother Nature but also with his domineering and possessive mama (Jessica Tandy).

  • We think of the Civil War in terms of great land battles. But the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College’s John T. Kuehn argues that the war on water – on rivers, in harbors, and on the high seas – was just as important.
    Thursday, February 20, 2014

    Americans are familiar with Civil War land battles—but much less so with the war at sea, from the development of ironclad warships and submarines to the more mundane naval blockade that created economic starvation in the South.

    On the 150th anniversary of the Confederates’ loss of the CSS Hunley—which had been the first combat Submarine to sink an enemy warship—John T. Kuehn of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College examines the largely underappreciated role that naval warfare played in the Civil War. Kuehn, a former Navy aviator, is the author of two books on the Pacific theater in World War II and another on the military history of Japan.

  • In this one-man show, historic re-enactor Charles Everett Pace portrays the slave who fled to freedom and became one of America’s most eloquent voices for abolition and civil rights.
    Wednesday, February 19, 2014

    Veteran re-enactor Charles Everett Pace brings his one man show to Kansas City to portray prominent abolitionist and social reformer Frederick Douglass.

    Born enslaved in 1818, Douglass successfully escaped from bondage in 1838 and quickly rose to the front ranks of leading abolitionists, becoming the most famous black American of his day. In the years leading up to the Civil War, his incisive anti-slavery writings and mesmerizing speeches reached broad audiences in the United States and the British Isles. Following emancipation, Douglass continued to lecture and write on civil rights issues, including women’s rights and desegregation. He wrote several versions of his autobiography between 1845 and 1892.

  • Experts explain how Kansas City’s gay rights community was making strides long before the 1969 Stonewall Riots in New York sparked the modern gay rights movement. Participating are Stuart Hinds, Kevin Scharlau, and Kay Madden.
    Tuesday, February 18, 2014

    Well before the famous 1969 Stonewall Riots in New York City sparked the modern gay rights movement, Kansas City had its own active gay rights community that was a meaningful participant in the larger national movement. Post-Stonewall, the city’s emerging gay and lesbian community strove to provide venues and services to address the growing needs of its members.

    Stuart Hinds, head of the LaBudde Special Collections at the UMKC Libraries; Kevin Scharlau, History PhD. candidate at UMKC; and attorney Kay Madden hold a lively discussion of the history of LGBT advocacy in the Kansas City area.

  • Drawing from official case files, the National Archives’ Jake Ersland explores the murderers, mob bosses, anarchists, bootleggers, and thieves – many from Kansas City – who have done time at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas.
    Sunday, February 16, 2014

    Murderers. Mob bosses. Anarchists. Bootleggers. Thieves. They’ve all found a home at the U.S. Penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas, regarded for many years as the ultimate high-security prison.

    Now their stories are told by the National Archives’ Jake Ersland in an exploration of the Archives’ “Record Group 129,” the inmate case files for the Leavenworth penitentiary. Ersland gives an illustrated lecture on the history of these valuable research files and the untold stories they contain, many with a Kansas City connection.

  • Think you’re film literate? Not until you’ve experienced the masterpieces of world cinema presented as part of this series.    An American in Paris (1951)
    Sunday, February 16, 2014

    The most famous movie about Paris was shot in Culver City, California. Indeed, An American in Paris sums up Hollywood in its Golden Era: Why bother with the real and true when the make-believe is so much more satisfying? This joyous celebration of music and dance ultimately becomes high art when, in its audacious final 16 minutes, it delivers a dazzling wordless ballet that brought out the best in choreographer/star Gene Kelly and director Vincente Minnelli.

  • Join vocalist and storyteller Brother John – performing as hepcat MC "Carr Mel Brown" – as he pays tribute to the the golden age of swing Jazz.     The program is appropriate for all ages.
    Friday, February 14, 2014

    Join vocalist and storyteller Brother John as he pays tribute to the likes of Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, and Lena Horne in an exploration of the golden age of swing jazz.

  • This all-day event explores the future of ultra-high-speed Internet with demonstrations of gigabit products, a panel discussion, and group breakouts that explore how gigabit apps could impact regional issues.
    Thursday, February 13, 2014

    The installation of ultra-high-speed Google Fiber internet service in Kansas City is well underway. But what will it mean to residents day to day on a practical level?

    That question will be addressed in an event exploring the future of hyper-fast internet applications and the innovations spurred by its implementation here.

  • Author David O. Stewart discusses his new novel offering an alternative history of the conspiracy to assassinate President Abraham Lincoln. Was John Wilkes Booth truly the mastermind or were other more powerful forces pulling the strings?
    Wednesday, February 12, 2014

    Was John Wilkes Booth truly the mastermind behind the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln and the plot to murder other members of his administration, or were other more powerful forces pulling the strings behind the scenes?

    Blending real and fictional characters, lawyer-turned-author David O. Stewart commemorates Lincoln’s Birthday with a discussion of his new work of historical fiction, The Lincoln Deception. Superbly researched and brilliantly plotted, this thoroughly gripping mystery explores one of the nation’s darkest and most fascinating eras and the conspiracy that changed world history.

  • The annual Searching the Psyche Through Cinema film screening and discussion series returns for an examination of the cinema of the “Master of Suspense,” Alfred Hitchcock.  Rear Window (1954; NR)
    Sunday, February 9, 2014

    A free series of films by Alfred Hitchcock who used film to explore his own neuroses and phobias, in the process revealing the psychological complexities we all share.

    Often cited as one of Hitchcock’s finest films, Rear Window may also be his most fully realized and psychologically intriguing. A photographer (James Stewart), confined to his Greenwich Village apartment with a broken leg, uses his telephoto lens to spy on the lives of his many neighbors. This meditation on voyeurism turns deadly when the snoop uncovers evidence of a murder. Grace Kelly makes her first appearance in a Hitchcock movie.