Event Archive

All Kansas City Public Library locations will close at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, November 26, and will remain closed all day Thursday, November 27, for Thanksgiving.

Search our archive of past events at the Library! You can search by keyword - such as event title, subject, or presenter name - or by a date range. To search for an exact phrase, put it in quotation marks. If you know the specific date of an event, enter the same date in both fields. Search results will only show events that match ALL entered terms.

Format: 2014-11-28
Format: 2014-11-28
  • Join a musical safari! Meet different African animals whose names are set to rhythm. Then pick up a percussion instrument and let the jungle jam begin!   Appropriate for all ages.
    Friday, March 7, 2014

    Join a musical safari! Meet different African animals whose names are set to rhythm. Then pick up a percussion instrument and let the jungle jam begin!

    As the rhythms of the animals blend an exciting sense of community begins to develop – along with a lot of fun.

    Appropriate for all ages.

  • Author Steven Watts discusses his new biography of Missourian Dale Carnegie, whose 1936 best seller How to Win Friends and Influence People helped launch the  self-help revolution.
    Thursday, March 6, 2014

    Decades before Oprah, Dr. Phil, and today’s innumerable gurus peddling surefire plans for bettering ourselves, Missourian Dale Carnegie started the self-help revolution with his worldwide best seller How to Win Friends and Influence People. Life magazine named Carnegie one of its “100 most important Americans of the 20th Century.”

  • Angela Elam of New Letters on the Air, aired locally on KCUR 89.3 FM, holds a public conversation with Maija Rhee Devine about her new novel about an arranged marriage from the Japanese occupation of Korea to today’s economically advanced, high-tech South Korea.
    Wednesday, March 5, 2014

    Angela Elam of New Letters on the Air, aired locally on KCUR 89.3 FM, holds a public conversation with author and Independence resident Maija Rhee Devine about her new novel The Voices of Heaven. It follows the arranged marriage of a Korean couple from the final years of the Japanese occupation through the Korean War and into the economically advanced, high-tech South Korea of today.

    Winner of an Emily Dickinson Poetry Award, Devine is working on a book of poems about Korean women forced to provide sexual services to Japanese troops. She is a survivor of the Korean War.

  • Chris Taylor director of the Atchison County Historical Society and the world’s smallest unofficial presidential library, offers an enlightening and whimsical review of the “presidency” of Missourian David Rice Atchison – who, some contend, spent 24 hours as president of the United States on March 4, 1849.
    Tuesday, March 4, 2014

    Due to a quirk in the calendar in the year 1849, one school of thought contends that Missourian David Rice Atchison deserves to be considered the 12th president of the United States. His “term of office” lasted just 24 hours — most of which he slept through — and took place 165 years ago today.

    On Sunday, March 4, 1849, Atchison was serving as president pro tempore of the senate, then third in line for succession to the presidency. Because James K. Polk’s term ended at noon on that day and Zachary Taylor didn’t take the oath of office until noon the next day, Atchison technically may have been the chief magistrate of the land during that interim period.

    Chris Taylor, executive director of the Atchison County Historical Society and the world’s smallest unofficial presidential library, offers a whimsical and educational review of Atchison’s brief administration.

  • Coterie Theatre artists read from their favorite children’s books while the audience enjoys an opportunity to “jump into the story” on stage. This program is appropriate for all ages. Fletcher and the Springtime Blossoms by Julia Rawlinson
    Sunday, March 2, 2014

    This event has been canceled due to inclement weather.

    Coterie Theatre Artists read from favorite children's books while the audience enjoys an opportunity to "jump into the story" and participate in an improvised story of their own making.

    Appropriate for all ages, Dramatic Story Time programs take place one Sunday each month at 2 p.m. throughout the 2013-2014 school year, beginning October 6, 2013.

  • Bayard Rustin helped shape Martin Luther King Jr., and organized the historic 1963 March on Washington. Now his life partner Walter Naegle discusses Rustin’s vision and introduces a screening of the documentary Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin.
    Saturday, March 1, 2014

    Bayard Rustin helped shape Martin Luther King Jr., and organized the historic 1963 March on Washington. Now his life partner Walter Naegle discusses Rustin’s vision, explains why his ideas are still relevant , and introduces a screening of the documentary Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin.

  • Charles L. Cohen kicks off this year’s McKinzie Symposium with a discussion of the issues facing minority religions in a political landscape dominated by Christianity.
    Thursday, February 27, 2014

    To kick off this year’s McKinzie symposium—One Nation Under God: The Politics of America’s Religious Diversity—the University of Wisconsin’s Charles L. Cohen delivers a keynote address on the issues facing minority religions in America.

    Cohen is a professor of history and religious studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and director of the Lubar Institute for the Study of the Abrahamic Religions.

  • Filmmaker Gary Jenkins discusses the rise and fall – thanks to a gang war - of Kansas City’s River Quay, and screens footage from his upcoming documentary, Gangland Wire.
    Wednesday, February 26, 2014

    Kansas City’s River Market area was known in the 1970s as River Quay, a redeveloped home to restaurants and bohemian shops—and site of a violent Mafia turf war.

    The dispute left three establishments burned or blown up and several mobsters killed, devastating the district. Gary Jenkins, a local attorney and documentary filmmaker, was a Kansas City police detective at the time and part of a subsequent investigation that uncovered a multi-city mob conspiracy to skim money from Las Vegas casinos.

  • In a discussion of his new book, historian John B. Judis looks back to the Truman administration in an examination of the roots of the Arab/Israeli conflict and explains how it might be ended.
    Tuesday, February 25, 2014

    John B. Judis, senior editor at The New Republic, examines the half-century of raging conflict between Jews and Arabs—a violent, costly struggle that has had catastrophic repercussions in a critical region of the world.

    The fatal flaw in American policy, Judis says, can be traced back to the Truman administration. What happened between 1945 and 1949 sealed the fate of the Middle East for the remainder of the century and explains why every subsequent attempt to stabilize the area has failed—right down to George W. Bush’s unsuccessful and ill-conceived effort to win peace by holding elections among Palestinians and Barack Obama’s failed attempt to bring both sides to the negotiating table.

  • Jeff Orlowski’s documentary follows environmental photographer James Balog - initially a skeptic on climate change - as his travels convince him of the impact that humans have on the planet.
    Monday, February 24, 2014

    Chasing Ice is a 2012 documentary about the efforts of photographer James Balog and his Extreme Ice Survey to publicize the effects of climate change. It features scenes of a glacier calving event that took place at Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland, the largest outer-edge breakup of a glacier ever captured on film.

    Balog was skeptical about the science of climate change when he began his trip north, but over the course of the documentary he became increasingly convinced that climate change is real and, in large part, man-made. Chasing Ice represents his effort to bring the story to the public.