Event Archive

Search our archive of past events at the Library! You can search by keyword - such as event title, subject, or presenter name - or by a date range. To search for an exact phrase, put it in quotation marks. If you know the specific date of an event, enter the same date in both fields. Search results will only show events that match ALL entered terms.

Format: 2015-08-04
Format: 2015-08-04
  • Vanity Fair contributing editor Howard Blum examines the German terror cell that operated in the U.S. early in World War I, hitting New Jersey’s munitions-packed Black Tom pier and other targets in a series of “accidents” involving explosives and biological weapons.
    Wednesday, October 8, 2014

    What happens when German spies collaborate to unleash a campaign of terror upon America at the start of World War I?

    In Dark Invasion: 1915, a New York City policeman uncovers a German plot to sabotage ships, factories, and even J.P Morgan himself. Howard Blum tells a gripping, true story of espionage and terror on American soil during World War I and the Irish cop who hunted for the conspirators among a population of more than 8 million Germans.

    Blum is the author of The New York Times bestseller and Edgar Award-winning American Lightning. He is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and has twice been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting.

  • In a discussion of his new book, Adam Tanner demonstrates how the personal information we routinely share with companies ranging from Amazon to casino giant Caesars Entertainment can quickly be mined and used by corporations, marketers, and more nefarious entities.
    Tuesday, October 7, 2014

    Facebook. Twitter. Amazon. Frequent-flyer numbers. Loyalty cards. Every day, we share personal information while buying something, trying to gain access or perks, or engaging in some other ordinary activity.

    In a discussion of his revealing new book, Adam Tanner illustrates how each bit of personal data we surrender can be combined with alarming speed into a personal profile that corporations, marketing services, and more nefarious entities use to their own advantage. Nobody does it better, he says, than Caesars Entertainment Corporation, whose Harrah’s North Kansas City casino — and its savvy senior vice president and general manager, Tom Cook — figure prominently in What Stays in Vegas.

  • Coterie Theatre artists read from their favorite children’s books while the audience enjoys an opportunity to “jump into the story” on stage. This program is appropriate for all ages.   The Cow Loves Cookies by Karma Wilson
    Sunday, October 5, 2014

    Coterie Theatre artists read from Karma Wilson’s popular children’s book, about a barnyard cow with peculiar mealtime tastes, while young audience members enjoy an opportunity to “jump into the story” – adding their own improvisation.

    Appropriate for all ages.

  • Award-winning author Ann Bausum tells a true story of a terrier that wandered onto an Army training field, befriending Pvt. James Robert Conroy and accompanying him into the trenches of World War I and onto the pages of history.  Appropriate for kindergartners and up.
    Friday, October 3, 2014

    Award-winning author Ann Bausum tells a true story of a terrier that wandered onto an Army training field, befriending Pvt. James Robert Conroy and accompanying him into the trenches of World War I and onto the pages of history. Appropriate for kindergartners and up.

  • The tales of fierce, all-female Amazon warriors were long assumed to be a product of Greek imagination. But as Stanford University’s Adrienne Mayor attests in a discussion of her deeply researched new book, Amazon-like women were very real – if mythologized.
    Thursday, October 2, 2014

    The image of fierce, all-female Amazons — barbarian archers on horseback who gloried in fighting, hunting, and sexual freedom — has endured from the days of ancient Greece. But were they more than myth?

    Adrienne Mayor, a research scholar in classics and in the history and philosophy of science at Stanford University, dissects the Amazonian legend in a discussion of her wide-ranging, deeply researched book. Unearthing long-buried evidence, she sifts fact from fiction in showing how flesh-and-blood women of the Eurasian steppes were mythologized as Amazons, the equals of men. Not only the Greeks were enchanted; Mayor shows that warlike women of nomadic cultures were featured in tales from ancient Egypt, Persia, India, Central Asia, and China.

  • Library Director Crosby Kemper III holds a public conversation with a young Ernest Hemingway – portrayed by local actor Rusty Sneary – as Meet the Past moves to Union Station in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the terminal’s 1914 opening.
    Wednesday, October 1, 2014

    Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd.


    Once the episode is aired on KCPT, it will be made available at kclibrary.org/meet-the-past.


    You MUST RSVP in order to be admitted to this event.
    Your RSVP entitles you to the specified number of general admission tickets.
    Tickets may be picked up at the Union Station ticket office starting at 5 p.m. on the day of the event. Standard Union Station parking rates apply.

  • Following a screening of the great, John Ford-directed Hollywood Western The Searchers, Pulitzer Prize winner Glenn Frankel discusses the true-life story behind it – a saga that started with the Comanche kidnapping of a 9-year-old white girl in 1836.
    Tuesday, September 30, 2014

    Film Screening: 4 p.m.   Program 6:30 p.m.

    The John Ford-John Wayne film, The Searchers, is one of the great Hollywood Westerns. But the movie was only a late entry in a real-life saga stretching back to 1830s Texas.

    In a discussion of his book, Glenn Frankel traces the story from the 1836 kidnapping of a white girl by Comanche Indians to her “rescue” almost 25 years later, her subsequent unhappy life, and the various retellings of the epic tale in fiction, theater, and opera leading up to Alan LeMay’s 1954 novel and Ford’s 1956 film.

    The talk by Frankel, a Pulitzer Prize-winning former reporter, editor and foreign bureau chief for The Washington Post who now heads the University of Texas’ School of Journalism, is preceded by a screening of The Searchers at 4 p.m.

  • In observance of the opening of Union Station 100 years ago next month, Jeffrey Spivak draws from his book, Union Station, Kansas City, in a discussion of the landmark building’s history, controversial adaptive reuse, and place in future transit and civic plans.
    Sunday, September 28, 2014

    Kansas City’s Union Station opened 100 years ago next month, a grand, 850,000-square-foot edifice that saw as many as 678,000-plus rail passengers pass through its doors in 1945. After falling into disuse and decay, it was restored and reopened in 1999 in all its original Beaux-Arts splendor – as home to theaters, museum exhibits, and such permanent attractions as Science City. With the return of train service, it’s the second-busiest terminal in the state.

    In observance of the centennial, Jeffrey Spivak draws from his 1999 book, Union Station, Kansas City, in discussing the station’s history, controversial adaptive reuse, and role in future transit and civic plans. Now, a senior market analyst at Black & Veatch, Spivak spent more than 23 years as a civic affairs reporter for The Kansas City Star.

  • Saturday, September 27, 2014

    Help us wrap up Banned Books Week with a celebration of the freedom to read! We'll introduce attendees to the annual Banned Books Week awareness campaign.

    Special guests include the Collins family, who recently drew international attention to their efforts to keep a Little Free Library in their Leawood, Kansas, front yard.

  • On the eve of a new Kansas City festival spotlighting the region’s vital role in the pork industry, a panel of craft butchers from across the country discusses sustainable pork production. A reception features locally prepared pork dishes.
    Friday, September 26, 2014

    The pig is big in these parts. Both Missouri and Kansas rank among the nation’s top 10 pork-producing states, annually putting more than 2 million pounds of bacon, ham, chops, and other cuts on grocers’ shelves and consumers’ tables.

    On the eve of a new, daylong Kansas City festival, Knife and Pork, that spotlights sustainability in the industry and the region’s vital role in it, four craft butchers from across the country – Rob Levitt of Chicago, Chris Eley of Indianapolis, and Jerry Traczyk and Jonny Hunter of Madison, Wis. – participate in a round-table discussion of sustainable pork production. A reception prior to the program offers locally prepared pork dishes.

    Co-presented by Recommended Daily and Local Pig, and co-sponsored by Tallgrass Brewing Company.