The Cavalry of the American Civil War

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The U.S. Army Command and General Staff College’s Louis DiMarco explains how the Battle of Yellow Tavern in May 1864 changed the role of cavalry in the Civil War from one of reconnaissance to active participation in battle.
Louis DiMarco
Thursday, May 15, 2014
6:30pm @ Central Library

For most of the Civil War, the role of cavalry was limited to reconnaissance and screening infantry movements.

But at the Battle of Yellow Tavern (Virginia) on May 11, 1864, a mounted federal force defeated the legendary rebel cavalry of J.E.B. Stuart, who was mortally wounded and died a day later. The North realized that cavalry could be an essential offensive tool.

Observing the 150th anniversary of the battle, Louis DiMarco of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth examines the role of mounted combat in the Civil War.

Co-sponsored by the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College Foundation.

Watch the video