Events

All Library locations will be closed on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day.

Tuesday, April 2 2013

Time Items
All day
Fri, 03/01/2013 (All day) - Fri, 05/31/2013 (All day)

Kansas City’s story doesn’t begin with fur traders and settlers. Rather it goes back millions of years to an era of rising and falling seas, thick green forests of towering ferns, and huge, now-extinct animals. That world, as revealed by the rocks beneath our feet, is explored in the exhibit KC|BC.

KC|BC complements Kansas City Millions of Years Ago – Reading the Rocks, a current show of digital illustrations and actual fossils at the Box Gallery in Suite 211 of the Commerce Bank Building, 1000 Walnut St.

Mon, 01/28/2013 (All day) - Fri, 05/31/2013 (All day)

In the pre-digital era before cell phones, satellites, and the Internet allowed travelers to instantly transmit their photos and comments to family and friends, Americans relied on “snail mail” and the picture postcard.

This exhibit gathers more than 200 examples of Kansas City postcards from the ‘30s and ‘40s. The cards – featuring images of landmarks, hotels, parks, and public buildings - have been drawn from the Mrs. Sam Ray Postcard Collection in the holdings of the Library’s Missouri Valley Special Collections.

Wed, 11/28/2012 (All day) - Sun, 06/30/2013 (All day)

Established in 1874, the Kansas City, Missouri Police Department has for 138 years protected our citizens while keeping abreast of changes in criminology, transportation, technology, and society. This long and colorful history is examined in a new exhibit, Kansas City’s Finest.

Sat, 06/11/2011 (All day) - Wed, 12/31/2014 (All day)

Hixon transformed the field of portrait photography in Kansas City and the surrounding region during a career that spanned more than seven decades. His studios—the first in the Brady Building at 11th and Main Streets, and the second just one block west in the Baltimore Hotel—welcomed thousands of patrons throughout the 1910s and 1920s.

9:00 am
Tue, 04/02/2013 - 9:30am - 10:00am

Come join us for thirty minutes of fun stories, songs, and learning activities!

Tue, 04/02/2013 - 9:30am - 11:00am

Learn what the Internet and your Internet browser can do for you. This class focuses on the basics of online navigation and searching. Call 816-701-3481 to register, or click here.

10:00 am
Tue, 04/02/2013 - 10:00am - 11:00am

Come join us every Tuesday for early literacy activities including songs, fingerplays, read-alouds, and occasional simple crafts. Afterwards there will be plenty of time to play with our toys in the beautiful children's room on the second floor. All ages welcome. Parking is Free!

Tue, 04/02/2013 - 10:00am - 10:45am

Come join us for lots of great stories, songs, fun learning activities and even a short movie - all geared for three and four-year-olds.

Tue, 04/02/2013 - 10:00am

Explores the meanings of different actions, expressions, words, and sounds, from a kiss and a clap to a wave and a yawn.

11:00 am
Tue, 04/02/2013 - 11:00am - 12:00pm

Learn more about getting around on your computer in this class, which offers insights into hardware and software components.

5:00 pm
Tue, 04/02/2013 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm

Come and celebrate your favorite series! We will read from the book, act out scenes, craft and play games. Ages 8-12.

6:00 pm
Tue, 04/02/2013 - 6:00pm

Families who can't make it to the Library during the day can enjoy this evening storytime. We will read great books, sing songs, and have a fun craft.

Tue, 04/02/2013 - 6:30pm

The six-week program America’s Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway kicks off with excerpts from the films Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues: Episode 1, Feel Like Going Home (2004) and Say Amen, Somebody (1983). Then UMKC musicologist Andrew Granade and special guest Pat Nichols, a Lawrence-based musician who specializes in the Delta blues, leads the audience in an investigation of blues as a source of our contemporary sounds.

Tue, 04/02/2013 - 6:30pm

Historian James G. Basker discusses his new book, a collection of writings reflecting our nation’s long, heated confrontation with that poisonous evil, slavery. This vast reservoir of abolitionist literature flowed from the pens of Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, William Lloyd Garrison, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, anonymous editorialists, and freed slaves. Basker is the editor of a new book, American Antislavery Writings: Colonial Beginnings to Emancipation, published by the Library of America.