Events

Wednesday, January 8 2014

Time Items
All day
Sat, 12/07/2013 (All day) - Fri, 01/31/2014 (All day)

For nearly three decades, journalist and educator John Tibbetts — an associate professor of film studies at the University of Kansas — has enlivened his interviews with Hollywood stars and filmmakers by creating watercolor portraits of his subjects. Invariably, his interviewees sign the paintings, leaving Tibbetts with a unique collection of personal art and famous autographs.

Sat, 06/11/2011 (All day) - Wed, 12/31/2014 (All day)

Hixon transformed the field of portrait photography in Kansas City and the surrounding region during a career that spanned more than seven decades. His studios—the first in the Brady Building at 11th and Main Streets, and the second just one block west in the Baltimore Hotel—welcomed thousands of patrons throughout the 1910s and 1920s.

9:00 am
Wed, 01/08/2014 - 9:30am

We provide stories and activities for children 12-24 months of age.

Wed, 01/08/2014 - 9:30am

It's never too early to read to your baby! We provide stories and activities for children newborn to 18 months of age.

10:00 am
Wed, 01/08/2014 - 10:30am - 11:30am

Be sure to bring your little one for fun activities and playtime! This new playgroup offers a chance to develop early literacy skills for children ages three months to five years old. Stop by anytime between 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Wed, 01/08/2014 - 10:30am

Children ages 2-5 will enjoy stories, songs, and crafts.

Wed, 01/08/2014 - 10:30am

It's never too early to read to your baby! We provide stories and activities for children newborn to 18 months of age.

3:00 pm
Wed, 01/08/2014 - 3:00pm - 5:30pm

Get your competitive juices flowing challenging your friends with a variety of games like NBA 2K14, Madden NFL25, Halo 5, Soulcalibur V . If you are more of a Wii fan, Smash Bros., Mario Cart, Dragon Ball Z may engage you in a friendly joust with your peers.
A nice collection of board games are available.

6:00 pm
Wed, 01/08/2014 - 6:30pm

On January 8, 1815 — 199 years ago — the vaunted British Army suffered an epic defeat by makeshift American forces under the command of Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans in what became the closing act of the War of 1812. Jackson’s remarkably improbable victory, which took place two weeks after the peace treaty ending the war had been signed, brought him national acclaim and led directly to his election to the presidency in 1828.

Richard Barbuto, deputy director of the department of military history at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth, delves into this triumph of American arms, the last time U.S. and British forces ever fought against each other.