Events

All Library locations will be closed on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day.

Saturday, March 15 2014

Time Items
All day
Sat, 02/01/2014 (All day) - Sun, 03/30/2014 (All day)

The role played by comic books in fighting fascism is explored in an exhibit spanning almost 70 years. During the war, superheroes such as Superman, Daredevil, and Captain America did battle with Adolf Hitler and his Nazis. Dr. Seuss, then an editorial cartoonist, depicted Hitler frolicking beneath the swaying bodies of executed Jews.

Sat, 06/11/2011 (All day) - Wed, 12/31/2014 (All day)

Hixon transformed the field of portrait photography in Kansas City and the surrounding region during a career that spanned more than seven decades. His studios—the first in the Brady Building at 11th and Main Streets, and the second just one block west in the Baltimore Hotel—welcomed thousands of patrons throughout the 1910s and 1920s.

10:00 am
Sat, 03/15/2014 - 10:00am - 12:00pm

In class you will learn basic English skills: reading, writing, and conversation. No fee or books required!

For more information, contact Katie Taylor at 816-701-3707 or katietaylor@kclibrary.org

Sat, 03/15/2014 - 10:30am - 11:30am

Sign up for a free e-mail account and follow along with this tutorial that teaches the ins and outs of sending and receiving email, as well as how to organize your messages.

1:00 pm
Sat, 03/15/2014 - 1:00pm - 4:00pm

Kids Team up for Art and help us create a work of art with professional artists to be displayed at our branch. Kids 7-13 are welcome to attend.

Sat, 03/15/2014 - 1:30pm

Film critics regard 1939 as the greatest year in Hollywood history, when more memorable movies were released than at any other time. Throughout 2014, the Kansas City Public Library recreates the movie going experience enjoyed by audiences 75 years earlier. Each week, the free series Hollywood’s Greatest Year will present a movie from 1939.

In the Stanley H. Durwood Film Vault, Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

2:00 pm
Sat, 03/15/2014 - 2:00pm

In the years after emancipation, many African Americans remained in virtual slavery through such insidious practices as prison labor and sharecropping. This documentary, nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, exposes a brutal system that would persist until the onset of World War II.

Randal M. Jelks, associate professor of American Studies with a joint appointment in African and African American Studies at the University of Kansas, provides opening and closing remarks.