Events

Wednesday, September 3 2014

Time Items
All day
Tue, 04/22/2014 (All day) - Sun, 01/04/2015 (All day)

For more than a century, the Kansas City Stockyards fed a nation hungry for fresh meat. The heyday of the stockyards is long gone, undermined by flood, environmental concerns, and shifting economics. But this powerful financial engine is celebrated in Cowtown: History of the Kansas City Stockyards, a new exhibition of photographs, blueprints, drawings, and documents culled from more than 5,000 items retrieved from a Livestock Exchange Building storeroom in 2008.

Sat, 06/11/2011 (All day) - Wed, 12/31/2014 (All day)

Hixon transformed the field of portrait photography in Kansas City and the surrounding region during a career that spanned more than seven decades. His studios—the first in the Brady Building at 11th and Main Streets, and the second just one block west in the Baltimore Hotel—welcomed thousands of patrons throughout the 1910s and 1920s.

9:00 am
Wed, 09/03/2014 - 9:00am

ESL (English as a Second Language)
Mondays through Fridays 9 a.m.
Central Library’s ESL classes are small, with excellent one-on-one
help in areas of conversation, pronunciation, grammar, math, and
American life. Classes are free, and parking is free for ESL students.
Please call Estelle Manning at 816.560.0135 for further information.

10:00 am
Wed, 09/03/2014 - 10:30am

Bring your little ones for a storytime with music and great books, followed by a fun activity for all to enjoy.

3:00 pm
Wed, 09/03/2014 - 3:00pm - 5:30pm

Get your competitive juices flowing challenging your friends with a variety of games like NBA 2K14, Madden NFL25. If you are more of a Wii fan, Smash Bros., Mario Cart, Dragon Ball Z may engage you in a friendly joust with your peers.
A nice collection of board games are also available.

6:00 pm
Wed, 09/03/2014 - 6:30pm

Two hundred years ago this month, during the War of 1812, the United States was in desperate straits. British forces had burned Washington, D.C. and threatened to do the same to other Eastern seaports. The enemy chose to attack Baltimore, the nation’s fourth-largest city.

America won an improbable victory at Fort McHenry, and Baltimore was saved. Washington lawyer Francis Scott Key – inspired by the sight of his country’s flag flying in defiance of 25 hours of British bombardment – scribbled a four-stanza poem: Oh say can you see ...

His “Defence of Fort McHenry” became a popular patriotic song, “The Star Spangled Banner,” and ultimately our national anthem.

Military historian Richard Barbuto of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Ft. Leavenworth discusses the battle that stirred Key and underscored America’s resolve to preserve her sovereignty.