Events

Sunday, September 14 2014

Time Items
All day
Sat, 09/13/2014 (All day) - Sun, 11/02/2014 (All day)

Internationally renowned textile artist Jason Pollen has made Kansas City his home since 1983. This exhibit of his work, some on public display for the first time, celebrates that three-decade (and counting) chapter of his career.

Sat, 09/06/2014 (All day) - Sun, 10/19/2014 (All day)

This new exhibit reflects the celebrations, sorrows, challenges, and other personal experiences of 40 artists – most of Chicano-Latino heritage – who mastered the specialized silkscreen technique of serigraphy in workshops at the Austin, Texas, studio of the late Sam Coronado.

Tue, 04/22/2014 (All day) - Sun, 01/04/2015 (All day)

For more than a century, the Kansas City Stockyards fed a nation hungry for fresh meat. The heyday of the stockyards is long gone, undermined by flood, environmental concerns, and shifting economics. But this powerful financial engine is celebrated in Cowtown: History of the Kansas City Stockyards, a new exhibition of photographs, blueprints, drawings, and documents culled from more than 5,000 items retrieved from a Livestock Exchange Building storeroom in 2008.

Sat, 06/11/2011 (All day) - Wed, 12/31/2014 (All day)

Hixon transformed the field of portrait photography in Kansas City and the surrounding region during a career that spanned more than seven decades. His studios—the first in the Brady Building at 11th and Main Streets, and the second just one block west in the Baltimore Hotel—welcomed thousands of patrons throughout the 1910s and 1920s.

2:00 pm
Sun, 09/14/2014 - 2:00pm

Fifty years ago, in September 1964, The Beatles appeared – some say flopped – at Kansas City’s Municipal Stadium. Charley Finley, controversial owner of the Kansas City Athletics baseball team, enticed the Fab Four to perform at the old ball field for a then astronomical $150,000 fee! The show barely drew 20,000 fans, and Finley lost his shirt. Rick Hellman, chronicler of the city’s music history, tells how Kansas City’s teenagers experienced a bit of rock-and-roll history during the exciting run-up and bewildering aftermath of the 31-minute concert.

Rick Hellman, a Kansas City native, journalist, and assignment editor at KSHB-TV, heads up the Kansas City Rock History Project (www.kcrockhistory.com).