Events

All Kansas City Public Library locations will close at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, November 26, and will remain closed all day Thursday, November 27, for Thanksgiving.

Sunday, September 28 2014

Time Items
All day
Sat, 09/13/2014 (All day) - Sun, 11/02/2014 (All day)

Internationally renowned textile artist Jason Pollen has made Kansas City his home since 1983. This exhibit of his work, some on public display for the first time, celebrates that three-decade (and counting) chapter of his career.

Sat, 09/06/2014 (All day) - Sun, 10/19/2014 (All day)

This new exhibit reflects the celebrations, sorrows, challenges, and other personal experiences of 40 artists – most of Chicano-Latino heritage – who mastered the specialized silkscreen technique of serigraphy in workshops at the Austin, Texas, studio of the late Sam Coronado.

Tue, 04/22/2014 (All day) - Sun, 04/12/2015 (All day)

For more than a century, the Kansas City Stockyards fed a nation hungry for fresh meat. The heyday of the stockyards is long gone, undermined by flood, environmental concerns, and shifting economics. But this powerful financial engine is celebrated in Cowtown: History of the Kansas City Stockyards, a new exhibition of photographs, blueprints, drawings, and documents culled from more than 5,000 items retrieved from a Livestock Exchange Building storeroom in 2008.

Sat, 06/11/2011 (All day) - Wed, 12/31/2014 (All day)

Hixon transformed the field of portrait photography in Kansas City and the surrounding region during a career that spanned more than seven decades. His studios—the first in the Brady Building at 11th and Main Streets, and the second just one block west in the Baltimore Hotel—welcomed thousands of patrons throughout the 1910s and 1920s.

1:00 pm
Sun, 09/28/2014 - 1:30pm - 3:30pm

Please join us this afternoon for our Sunday family movie. (Parents with children)

2:00 pm
Sun, 09/28/2014 - 2:00pm

Kansas City’s Union Station opened 100 years ago next month, a grand, 850,000-square-foot edifice that saw as many as 678,000-plus rail passengers pass through its doors in 1945. After falling into disuse and decay, it was restored and reopened in 1999 in all its original Beaux-Arts splendor – as home to theaters, museum exhibits, and such permanent attractions as Science City. With the return of train service, it’s the second-busiest terminal in the state.

In observance of the centennial, Jeffrey Spivak draws from his 1999 book, Union Station, Kansas City, in discussing the station’s history, controversial adaptive reuse, and role in future transit and civic plans. Now, a senior market analyst at Black & Veatch, Spivak spent more than 23 years as a civic affairs reporter for The Kansas City Star.