All Events & Activities: anytime, any location, all ages

Wednesday, December 3, 2014
9:30am @ Waldo Branch

We provide stories and activities for children 12-24 months of age.


Wednesday, December 3, 2014
10:30am @ Waldo Branch

Children ages 2-5 will enjoy stories, songs, and crafts.


Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Bring your little ones for a storytime with music and great books, followed by a fun activity for all to enjoy.


Friday, December 5, 2014

Central Library’s ESL classes are small, with excellent one-on-one help in areas of conversation, pronunciation, grammar, math, and American life.

Classes are free and parking is free for all ESL students.

Please call Estelle Manning at 816.560.0135 for further information.


Friday, December 5, 2014

Stories, songs, crafts and more!!


Friday, December 5, 2014
5:00pm @ Plaza Branch

Looking for the perfect card to complete your deck? Stop by the plaza library and trade, then put your best deck to the test!


Saturday, December 6, 2014

Are you tired of planting the same old flower bulbs? Then come to the Bulb Exchange Party. All you have to do is bring some of your bulbs and be ready to exchange them with a fellow green thumb for a variety of bulbs that are sure to make your flower garden both beautiful and diverse.


Saturday, December 6, 2014

Learn more about getting around on your computer in this class, which offers insights into hardware and software components.


Saturday, December 6, 2014
1:30pm @ Plaza Branch

Children in kindergarten through eighth grade are encouraged to tap their creative energies and create masterpieces at Westport Center for the Arts’ “Kids Team Up for Art” Workshops at the Kansas City Public Libraries. For artists age 5-14; friends and families of any age welcome!

Led by artists Michelle Kozubek and Rosie Vega.


Sunday, December 7, 2014

As the one time head of President Woodrow Wilson’s Committee on Public Information, George Creel later recalled in his memoir “how we advertised America” but more accurately it was how he sold World War I to a largely neutral populace. Wilson, whose 1916 reelection campaign proclaimed, “he kept us out of war,” abruptly switched gears, and the electorate needed to catch up quickly. A native Missourian and former Kansas City newspaperman, Creel imaginatively combined the new techniques of public relations and propaganda with extensive government censorship to shape public opinion and control the flow of war information. Historian Timothy Westcott traces the life and career of Creel, who created the template for an entire industry of Madison Avenue “Mad Men.”