Events: anytime, any location, all ages

All Library locations will be closed on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014
6:30pm

Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., Kansas City, MO 64108
Regnier Extreme Screen Theatre

Please Note:
You MUST RSVP in order to be admitted to this event.
Your RSVP entitles you to the specified number of general admission tickets.
Tickets may be picked up at the Union Station ticket office starting at 5 p.m. on the day of the event.

Mark the centennial of Union Station and be part of the studio audience when KCPT’s Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III returns for a conversation with a young, brash, and bold Ernest Hemingway, portrayed by local actor Rusty Sneary, at Union Station’s Regnier Extreme Screen Theatre.

Hemingway credited The Kansas City Star for shaping his inimitable writing style even though he spent a scant six months with the newspaper as a cub reporter. A 1918 Kansas City Red Cross recruitment effort steered Hemingway to Italy as an ambulance driver. His initial impressions of the Italian Front served as inspiration for Death in the Afternoon. A serious injury by mortar fire sent Hemingway to a Red Cross hospital for six months where he fell in love with nurse Agnes von Kurowsky. He immortalized his injury, romance, and other wartime experiences in A Farewell to Arms.


Friday, October 3, 2014

Adopted as the mascot of the U.S. Army’s 102nd Infantry regiment, Stubby the dog became a comrade-in-arms. Ann Bausum recounts the remarkable life of this courageous canine, who served on 17 battlefields, suffered wounds from crossfire, became a national celebrity, met three presidents, and found a best friend in American soldier J. Robert Conroy.

Bausum has written nine National Geographic books for young readers during the past twelve years. She has won numerous awards, including a Sibert Honor Award and three other national awards for literature.

Co-presented by the Kansas City Public Library and the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.


Saturday, October 4, 2014
9:00am

Location: City Market, 400 Grand St.

Join us on the first Saturday of every month (June–October) as the Friends of the Kansas City Public Library present the seventh annual City Market Summer Book Sales, from 9 a.m.–2 p.m.


Wednesday, October 8, 2014

What happens when German spies collaborate to unleash a campaign of terror upon America at the start of World War I?

In Dark Invasion: 1915, a New York City policeman uncovers a German plot to sabotage ships, factories, and even J.P Morgan himself. Howard Blum tells a gripping, true story of espionage and terror on American soil during World War I and the Irish cop who hunted for the conspirators among a population of more than 8 million Germans.

Blum is the author of The New York Times bestseller and Edgar Award-winning American Lightning. He is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and has twice been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting.


Saturday, October 11, 2014

The Westport Historical Society and the Westport Branch Library present Daniel Smith: Climax on the Border, Battle of Westport 1864

Second Saturday Speaker Series, October 11th, 2014 @ 2:00pm
Westport Branch Library, 118 Westport Road
Speaker's Reception follows at the Harris Kearney House, 40th & Baltimore

Title of Talk: Climax on the Border - Battle of Westport, October 21-23, 1864


Sunday, October 12, 2014

Before the birth of Kansas City jazz, the musical community served up ragtime and blues. In 1917, the military-themed anthem “Over There” became a nationwide hit following America’s entry into the war. Peabody Award-winning radio personality Michael Lasser explores the popular songs inspired by World War I, many of which we still hum today.

Lasser has been called “a walking encyclopedia of American song” and is the author of America’s Songs II: Songs from the 1890s to the Post-War Years. He hosts a weekly syndicated radio show “Fascinatin’ Rhythm.”


Wednesday, October 15, 2014

It’s easy to think of World War I as a European war, but fierce fighting all over the Middle East brought about great changes on socio-economic, cultural, and political levels. Kristian Coates Ulrichsen explores the lasting impact of the Great War on the region’s political geography in The First World War in the Middle East, and shows how national identities were formed as the Ottoman Empire disintegrated.

Kristian Coates Ulrichsen is a Research Fellow at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy in Houston and an Associate Fellow at Chatham House in London.

Co-presented by the Kansas City Public Library and the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.


Friday, October 17, 2014

The 2014 Kansas City Digital Inclusion Summit will provide a forum to share and discuss digital inclusion efforts and needs in Kansas City and exchange best practices and trends in the field of work that includes digital and online information literacy, broadband adoption, low-cost technology, economic and workforce development and public access to information technology.