Events: anytime, any location, all ages

All Library locations will be closed on Monday, September 7th in observance of Labor Day.

Saturday, October 3, 2015
9:00am

Location: City Market, 400 Grand St.

Join us on the first Saturday of every month (June–October) as the Friends of the Kansas City Public Library present the eighth annual City Market Summer Book Sale, from 9 a.m.–2 p.m. At the City Market, 400 Grand St. - North Walkway next to the Steamboat Arabia. For additional information, contact info@kclibraryfriends.org, or call 816.701.3468.


Monday, October 5, 2015

Former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert B. Reich worries that America’s economic recovery is bypassing most Americans. Adjusted for inflation, median hourly and weekly pay has dropped over the past year. Since the depths of the Great Recession in 2009, median household income has fallen nearly 4.5 percent. Well-funded special interests have been allowed to tilt the market to their benefit, shrinking the middle class and creating the greatest income inequality and wealth disparity in 80 years.

In a discussion of his new book, Reich examines how the economic system that helped make our country strong is now failing us. And he lays out what’s needed to fix it. Many of today’s workers aren’t paid what they’re worth. A higher minimum wage doesn’t equal fewer jobs. And corporations needn’t serve shareholders before employees.


Friday, October 9, 2015

Celebrate Alice’s 150th birthday at a Mad Hatter tea and birthday party. Come in an outlandish hat or make your own. Crafts, games, snacks, and other silly fun suitable for all ages.


Saturday, October 10, 2015

The Westport Historical Society Speaker Series seeks to promote and foster public interest in and preserve the significance of local history.

Title of Talk: Longview Farm - Biography of a Dream Come True

Speaker: Teresa Thornton Mitchell

Join us at the Westport Branch Library on Saturday October 10th as we welcome author Teresa Thornton Mitchell. Ms. Mitchell will be presenting and sharing information from her 2011 book Longview Farm: Biography of a Dream Come True.


Sunday, October 11, 2015

Kansas City’s Green Duck Tavern, at 26th Street and Prospect Avenue, was once an unassuming seat of power, owned by politician and civil rights activist Leon Jordan and a place for him and other leaders of the political organization Freedom, Inc., to map out strategy. It’s also where Jordan was gunned down gangland-style one early morning in 1970.

Joelouis Mattox, who serves as historian for the city’s Historic Preservation Commission, discusses the Green Duck and other notable places in KC with … um, checkered reputations. Also among them: the Castle Theater at 12th and Paseo; the Rhythm Lanes Skating Rink, Ray’s Golden Lounge, and Inferno Lounge on Troost; the Carver Theater and the Linwood Theater, both on Prospect; and Party House and the Log Cabin Lounge, both on 31st.


Tuesday, October 13, 2015

2015 commemorates not only the 125th anniversary of the birth of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, but also the U.S. Census Bureau’s declaration that the American frontier had closed. As historian Tim Rives explains, these two events are not unrelated.

Like other progressives of his generation, Eisenhower saw the extinction of the frontier as the end of the first phase of American history, and the beginning of a new age in which the federal government would replace the lost reservoir of free land and abundant resources with economic cooperation and individual security through social programs. More than any other single factor, Eisenhower’s interpretation of the vanished frontier is what distinguishes his “Middle Way” political philosophy from the conservative wing of the Republican Party he led through two terms as a president.

Tim Rives is the deputy director and supervisory archivist of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum and Boyhood Home in Abilene, Kansas.


Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Internationally recognized Kansas City artist Peregrine Honig fixes her creative gaze on Lewis Carroll’s classic work of children’s literature, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, and curates an exhibit that invites viewers to experience a sense of psychedelic discovery and bewilderment akin to Alice’s dreams and conflicts while wandering the Wonderlandscape. Honig has assembled an acclaimed collective of award- winning artists and fashion designers for her exhibit Intimate Riot.


Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Kansas City jazz legend Angela Hagenbach leads a diverse ensemble cast in an original and unique retelling of the Lewis Carroll classic. In this version, Alice explores Wonderland while accompanied by the music of John Coltrane (with original lyrics written by Hagenbach).

Hagenbach presents a perfect pairing, matching the unexpected wonders of Carroll's imagination with the improvisational magic of Coltrane's bebop sax for a performance that will delight and entertain audiences of all ages.

Known for interpretations of material by Duke Ellington and Henry Mancini, Hagenbach has performed at the Kennedy Center and toured 17 countries as a Cultural Jazz Ambassador for the U.S. State Department. Since her debut album Come Fly with Me, she has earned critical praise for her mainstream jazz sensibilities from JazzTimes, L.A. Jazz Scene, and National Public Radio.


Wednesday, February 17, 2016

The PBS documentary series Latino Americans: The 500 Year Legacy That Reshaped a Nation chronicles the rich and varied history and experiences of Latinos in the U.S. The Library screens the episode Empire of Dreams, covering the period from 1880-1942, when the influx of newly immigrated Cubans, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans began arriving and building strong Latino-American communities in our country.

A discussion afterward is led by two University of Kansas scholars: Ruben Flores, an associate professor of American studies associate director of the school’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and Christina Bejarano, an associate professor of political science and faculty member in university’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.


Tuesday, May 10, 2016

The Santa Fe Trail was best known as a commercial trade route from Independence, Missouri, to Santa Fe, New Mexico. But while Americans called it “the road to Santa Fe,” Mexicans knew it as “el Camino a los Estados Unidos” (the road to the United States). The number of immigrants making their way up the corridor eventually outnumbered Americans coming the other way.

David Aamodt, administrator of the National Frontier Trails Museum in Independence, and Richard Edwards, the museum’s curator of education, examine the Santa Fe Trail from the Mexican perspective, how it made early Independence more a Mexican than an American city, and how the trail helped blend cultures and economies and shape the American identity – from the once-vibrant Missouri mule industry to the country’s enduring passion for Mexican food.


Kansas City Public Library Beta