Events: anytime, any location, all ages

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Aristocratic and sophisticated, Edith Kermit Roosevelt, the wife of Theodore Roosevelt, ran the White House with a sure hand and figured prominently in how the institution of the first lady developed during the 20th century. But her reputation as a secular saint is misleading, says historian Lewis L. Gould, who points among other things to her virulent racism.

Gould, the Eugene C. Barker Centennial Professor Emeritus in American History at the University of Texas at Austin, discusses the complex subject of his book Edith Kermit Roosevelt: Creating the Modern First Lady.

The presentation is part of the Beyond the Gowns series, made possible by grants from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to the Kansas City Public Library and the Truman Library Institute.


Tuesday, April 28, 2015

The ranch house became an integral part of the vocabulary of the U.S. housing market after World War II, when the demand for a single-family home reached record levels.

Today, there is a resurgence of interest in this modernistic, uniquely American architectural creation and a new generation of homebuyers is discovering its allure. Mary van Balgooy, a leading authority on the ranch house and biographer of influential architect and ranch house pioneer Cliff May, discusses the
legendary builder, the ranch home’s influences and features, and the race to preserve it.


Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Granted, there are creative lone wolves out there. But history and social psychology tell us that success stems far more often from one-to-one collaboration. Think John Lennon and Paul McCartney, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak.

Writer Joshua Wolf Shenk sits down with native Kansan and former colleague Robert Day to discuss the elements and impact of creative chemistry and Shenk’s new, science-backed book Powers of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs.


Thursday, April 30, 2015

Stanford University’s Eric Hanushek puts the value of quality teaching in stark economic terms. Place even a slightly above-average teacher in front of a class of 20, and the resultant gain is more than $400,000 in future earnings over the earnings of students exposed to an average teacher. Replacing the bottom 5 to 8 percent of teachers with average instructors, he says, could lift the U.S. near the top of international math and science rankings.

Hanushek, the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, discusses the economic value of effective teachers and the assertion that their impact is sufficiently large to make significant changes in how we evaluate and reward them.

Co-sponsored by the Show-Me Institute and the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation.


Sunday, May 3, 2015

Coterie Theatre artists read from favorite children's books, while young audience members enjoy an opportunity to “jump into the story” – adding their own improvisation. Dramatic Story Times take place one Sunday every month at 2 p.m. throughout the 2014-2015 school year, beginning October 5th, 2014.



May's Selection:
Take Me to Your BBQ by Kathy Duval

Appropriate for all ages.


Sunday, May 10, 2015

The Library’s ninth season of Script-in-Hand performances, featuring the Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre concludes with The Light in the Piazza.

This dreamy, Tony-winning musical revolves around wealthy Margaret Johnson and her beautiful but emotionally stalled teenage daughter, Clara, who spend a summer together in the Tuscan countryside. When Clara falls in love with an earnest, dashing, and passionate young Italian, a protective Margaret must decide what to do with a secret from the girl’s past — which could take romance off the table — while confronting her own deep-seated hopes and regrets.


Sunday, May 17, 2015

By the time of Lee's surrender at Appomattox, the land and people of western Missouri had suffered as much as any during the Civil War. The edict known as “Order No. 11” and the Federal army that carried it out in 1863 had depopulated several Missouri counties, devastated homes and farms, and left deep scars—“a burnt district”—that took decades to heal. Focusing on families and communities, author Tom Rafiner looks at what former residents found when they returned after the Civil War on the western border had ended. Order No. 11 cast a long, dark shadow over postwar Missouri but left a puzzling legacy, at times appearing and disappearing from the consciousness of the region's inhabitants.


Sunday, June 7, 2015

The federal government has been keeping tabs on foreign visitors to these shores for decades. In 1940 the Immigration and Naturalization Service began issuing each of them an Alien Registration number, and in 1944—in the midst of World War II—began to use this number to create individual case files called Alien Files or “A-Files.” They contain all records from any active case of an alien not yet naturalized—visas, photographs, applications, affidavits, and official correspondence—gathered as the individual passed through the U.S. immigration and inspection process.

Archivist Elizabeth Burnes of the National Archives of Kansas City shows how the enterprising genealogist, biographer, or historian can access this treasure trove of information. The National Archives preserves and makes available to researchers more than 450,000 A-Files for individuals who were born in 1910 or earlier, many of them with direct connections to this area.