Events: anytime, any location, all ages

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

There are many myths and legends that come out of our presidential campaigns. None are more persistent, and adopted wholesale by virtually all observers, than the one that argues that neither Republican Dwight D. Eisenhower, nor Democrat Adlai E. Stevenson—who would square off against each other in the presidential election of 1952—wanted to run, but were talked into running by supporters who were acting against the expressed wishes of the two men.

Noted presidential scholar John Robert Greene examines “The Tale of the Final Drafts”—the supposed last genuine drafts of presidential candidates to this point in our history—in a wide-ranging re-interpretation of the 1952 campaign. Greene, author of what is to date the only book-length study of the election (now being updated for the University Press of Kansas), is the Schupf Professor of History and Humanities at Cazenovia College. Among his many books are Betty Ford, The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford, The Limits of Power: The Nixon and Ford Administrations, and America in the Sixties. He has appeared as a commentator in such television documentaries as Betty Ford, American Experience: George W. Bush, and To the Best of My Ability: The American Presidency.


Friday, August 21, 2015

Doors open: 8 p.m. • Program: 8:45 p.m.

The Library’s annual summer Off-the-Wall film series takes filmgoers Down the Rabbit Hole, celebrating movies about people cast into strange, through-the-looking-glass lands.

The fate of the world lies in the hands of a couple of truant air-guitar enthusiasts whose partnership is destined to bring about world peace. Bill and Ted might just save the future—if they can pass high school history class. They have the ultimate study aid, though: a time-traveling phone booth. Starring Alex Winter and Keanu Reeves.


Saturday, September 5, 2015
9:00am

Location: City Market, 400 Grand St.

Join us on the first Saturday of every month (June–October) as the Friends of the Kansas City Public Library present the eighth annual City Market Summer Book Sale, from 9 a.m.–2 p.m. At the City Market, 400 Grand St. - North Walkway next to the Steamboat Arabia. For additional information, contact info@kclibraryfriends.org, or call 816.701.3468.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

In a critical Cold War moment, Dwight D. Eisenhower’s presidency suddenly changed when the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the world’s first satellite. What Ike called “a small ball” became a source of Russian pride and propaganda, and it wounded him politically, as critics charged that he responded sluggishly to the challenge of space exploration. Yet Eisenhower refused to panic after Sputnik—and he did more than just stay calm. He helped to guide the United States into the Space Age, even though Americans have given greater credit to John F. Kennedy for that achievement.

Yanek Mieczkowski, author of Eisenhower’s Sputnik Moment, examines the early history of America’s space program, reassessing Eisenhower’s leadership. He details how Eisenhower approved breakthrough satellites, supported a new civilian space agency, signed a landmark science education law, and fostered improved relations with scientists. These feats made Eisenhower’s post-Sputnik years not the flop that critics alleged but a time of remarkable progress, even as he endured the setbacks of recession, medical illness, and a humiliating first U.S. attempt to launch a satellite.


Friday, September 18, 2015

The Library’s annual summer Off-the-Wall film series takes filmgoers Down the Rabbit Hole, celebrating movies about people cast into strange, through-the-looking-glass lands.

Assuming the identity of “Susan” listed in a personals ad, a bored suburbanite navigates the wild Wonderland of 1980s-era New York City. Starring Rosanna Arquette and Madonna.


Saturday, October 3, 2015
9:00am

Location: City Market, 400 Grand St.

Join us on the first Saturday of every month (June–October) as the Friends of the Kansas City Public Library present the eighth annual City Market Summer Book Sale, from 9 a.m.–2 p.m. At the City Market, 400 Grand St. - North Walkway next to the Steamboat Arabia. For additional information, contact info@kclibraryfriends.org, or call 816.701.3468.


Tuesday, October 13, 2015

2015 commemorates not only the 125th anniversary of the birth of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, but also the U.S. Census Bureau’s declaration that the American frontier had closed. As historian Tim Rives explains, these two events are not unrelated.

Like other progressives of his generation, Eisenhower saw the extinction of the frontier as the end of the first phase of American history, and the beginning of a new age in which the federal government would replace the lost reservoir of free land and abundant resources with economic cooperation and individual security through social programs. More than any other single factor, Eisenhower’s interpretation of the vanished frontier is what distinguishes his “Middle Way” political philosophy from the conservative wing of the Republican Party he led through two terms as a president.

Tim Rives is the deputy director and supervisory archivist of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum and Boyhood Home in Abilene, Kansas.