Events: anytime, any location, all ages

Monday, October 5, 2015
6:30pm @ Plaza Branch

Please note: This event is at capacity and RSVPs are now closed. The event can be viewed live online at

Former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert B. Reich worries that America’s economic recovery is bypassing most Americans. Adjusted for inflation, median hourly and weekly pay has dropped over the past year. Since the depths of the Great Recession in 2009, median household income has fallen nearly 4.5 percent. Well-funded special interests have been allowed to tilt the market to their benefit, shrinking the middle class and creating the greatest income inequality and wealth disparity in 80 years.

In a discussion of his new book, Reich examines how the economic system that helped make our country strong is now failing us. And he lays out what’s needed to fix it. Many of today’s workers aren’t paid what they’re worth. A higher minimum wage doesn’t equal fewer jobs. And corporations needn’t serve shareholders before employees.

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

The latest installment of the Library’s Real/Modern series features a conversation with local fashion experts about topics ranging from Kansas City’s style scene to new industry innovations. How do designers take their creations from concept to closets? Can a well-designed outfit impact personal and professional empowerment? How are creative types looking beyond the runway to incorporate technology into their work or their business?

Thursday, October 8, 2015

The life stories of Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Arna Bontemps, and other luminaries of the Harlem Renaissance extended well west of New York City. Hughes, for example, was raised in Kansas, and his move to Mexico opened a window on African Americans’ transnational experiences. Toomer’s interaction with a multi-national, multi-racial population in Taos, New Mexico, buttressed his notion of a “new American race.”

Emily Lutenski, an assistant professor of American studies at Saint Louis University, offers a newly nuanced look at the roots and influences of these key literary figures in a discussion of her book West of Harlem: African American Writers and the Borderlands.

Friday, October 9, 2015

Celebrate Alice’s 150th birthday at a Mad Hatter tea and birthday party. Come in an outlandish hat or make your own. Crafts, games, snacks, and other silly fun suitable for all ages.

Saturday, October 10, 2015

The Westport Historical Society Speaker Series seeks to promote and foster public interest in and preserve the significance of local history.

Title of Talk: Longview Farm - Biography of a Dream Come True

Speaker: Teresa Thornton Mitchell

Join us at the Westport Branch Library on Saturday October 10th as we welcome author Teresa Thornton Mitchell. Ms. Mitchell will be presenting and sharing information from her 2011 book Longview Farm: Biography of a Dream Come True.

Sunday, October 11, 2015

Kansas City’s Green Duck Tavern, at 26th Street and Prospect Avenue, was once an unassuming seat of power, owned by politician and civil rights activist Leon Jordan and a place for him and other leaders of the political organization Freedom, Inc., to map out strategy. A recent addition to the Kansas City Register of Historic Places, it also is where Jordan was gunned down gangland-style one early morning in 1970.

Joelouis Mattox, who serves as historian for the city’s Historic Preservation Commission, discusses the Green Duck and other notable places in KC with … um, checkered reputations. Also among them: the Castle Theater at 12th and Paseo; the Rhythm Lanes Skating Rink, Ray’s Golden Lounge, and Inferno Lounge on Troost; the Carver Theater and the Linwood Theater, both on Prospect; and Party House and the Log Cabin Lounge, both on 31st.

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

2015 commemorates not only the 125th anniversary of the birth of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, but also the U.S. Census Bureau’s declaration that the American frontier had closed. As historian Tim Rives explains, these two events are not unrelated.

Like other progressives of his generation, Eisenhower saw the extinction of the frontier as the end of the first phase of American history, and the beginning of a new age in which the federal government would replace the lost reservoir of free land and abundant resources with economic cooperation and individual security through social programs. More than any other single factor, Eisenhower’s interpretation of the vanished frontier is what distinguishes his “Middle Way” political philosophy from the conservative wing of the Republican Party he led through two terms as a president.

Tim Rives is the deputy director and supervisory archivist of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum and Boyhood Home in Abilene, Kansas.

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Internationally recognized Kansas City artist Peregrine Honig fixes her creative gaze on Lewis Carroll’s classic work of children’s literature, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, and curates an exhibit that invites viewers to experience a sense of psychedelic discovery and bewilderment akin to Alice’s dreams and conflicts while wandering the Wonderlandscape. Honig has assembled an acclaimed collective of award- winning artists and fashion designers for her exhibit Intimate Riot.

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Among the swarms of visitors to San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge each year are, tragically, hundreds of troubled souls intent on committing suicide. Many who didn’t follow through have Kevin Briggs to thank.

The former highway patrol officer and sergeant has talked scores of people back to safety along the 220-foot-high span, drawing from his own personal struggles — a bout with cancer, multiple heart operations, divorce, and depression — to strike the right tone of empathy while using an instinct for improvisation. In two decades of work on the iconic bridge, he lost only two would-be jumpers.

Thursday, October 15, 2015

As our 27th president from 1909-1913 and then as chief justice of the Supreme Court from 1921-1930, William Howard Taft was the only man ever to head two of America’s three governing branches. But between these two well-documented periods in office lies an eight-year patch of largely unexplored political wilderness — a time when Taft somehow rose from ignominious defeat in the 1912 presidential election to leadership of the nation’s highest court.

Monmouth College historian Lewis L. Gould delivers the first in-depth look at this interval in Taft’s singular career in a discussion of his book Chief Executive to Chief Justice: Taft Betwixt the White House and Supreme Court.

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