Movies: anytime, any location, all ages

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Orson Welles, born 100 years ago this month, would have left an indelible imprint on filmmaking if he’d stopped with Citizen Kane in 1941. But he would work more than four more decades, accruing 35 big-screen credits as a director and more than 100 as an actor before his death in 1985. Recall, or be introduced to, Welles’ genius with screenings of five of his films in May – curated by John Tibbetts, associate professor of film and media studies at the University of Kansas.

In the Stanley H. Durwood Film Vault, Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.


Friday, May 8, 2015

Come join us in the spacious Westport Meeting Room for a great movie and light refreshments.


Saturday, May 9, 2015

Orson Welles, born 100 years ago this month, would have left an indelible imprint on filmmaking if he’d stopped with Citizen Kane in 1941. But he would work more than four more decades, accruing 35 big-screen credits as a director and more than 100 as an actor before his death in 1985. Recall, or be introduced to, Welles’ genius with screenings of five of his films in May – curated by John Tibbetts, associate professor of film and media studies at the University of Kansas.

In the Stanley H. Durwood Film Vault, Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.


Friday, May 15, 2015

Doors open: 8 p.m. • Program: 8:45 p.m.

The Library’s summer series of outdoor movies—focusing on strangers cast into strange, through-the-looking-glass lands—kicks off with this dark fantasy classic directed by Monty Python member Terry Gilliam. A young boy joins a band of six renegade dwarves on a breakneck, time-travel trek through history, encountering an assortment of historical figures including a powerful Agamemnon (Sean Connery) and a stuffy Robin Hood (Python headliner John Cleese).


Saturday, May 16, 2015

Orson Welles, born 100 years ago this month, would have left an indelible imprint on filmmaking if he’d stopped with Citizen Kane in 1941. But he would work more than four more decades, accruing 35 big-screen credits as a director and more than 100 as an actor before his death in 1985. Recall, or be introduced to, Welles’ genius with screenings of five of his films in May – curated by John Tibbetts, associate professor of film and media studies at the University of Kansas.

In the Stanley H. Durwood Film Vault, Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.


Thursday, May 21, 2015

Please join us as we enjoy a movie on our big screen.


Saturday, May 23, 2015

Orson Welles, born 100 years ago this month, would have left an indelible imprint on filmmaking if he’d stopped with Citizen Kane in 1941. But he would work more than four more decades, accruing 35 big-screen credits as a director and more than 100 as an actor before his death in 1985. Recall, or be introduced to, Welles’ genius with screenings of five of his films in May – curated by John Tibbetts, associate professor of film and media studies at the University of Kansas.

In the Stanley H. Durwood Film Vault, Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.


Saturday, May 30, 2015

Orson Welles, born 100 years ago this month, would have left an indelible imprint on filmmaking if he’d stopped with Citizen Kane in 1941. But he would work more than four more decades, accruing 35 big-screen credits as a director and more than 100 as an actor before his death in 1985. Recall, or be introduced to, Welles’ genius with screenings of five of his films in May – curated by John Tibbetts, associate professor of film and media studies at the University of Kansas.

In the Stanley H. Durwood Film Vault, Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.


Friday, June 19, 2015

Doors open: 8 p.m. • Program: 8:45 p.m.

The Library’s annual summer Off-the-Wall film series takes filmgoers Down the Rabbit Hole, celebrating movies about people cast into strange, through-the-looking-glass lands. In Tron, a video game programmer (Jeff Bridges) is transported through a pixel portal into the neon world he created.


Friday, July 17, 2015

Doors open: 8 p.m. • Program: 8:45 p.m.

The Library’s annual summer Off-the-Wall film series takes filmgoers Down the Rabbit Hole, celebrating movies about people cast into strange, through-the-looking-glass lands. In Labyrinth, a girl (Jennifer Connelly) braves a magical maze of muppets to rescue her baby brother from a glam-rock Goblin King (David Bowie.)