All Events & Activities: anytime, any location, all ages

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Football’s evolution from sport to religion will be reconfirmed Feb. 1, 2015, when 85,000 fans in Glendale, Arizona, and a global TV audience of more than 100 million obsess over Super Bowl Sunday.

We love football so much that best-selling author Steve Almond says we’ve become blind to the fact that it simply isn’t good for us. Players suffer brain damage. Children and teenagers are susceptible to the same injuries and the same, debilitating, long-term effects. Beyond that is a question of whether our addiction to football fosters a tolerance for violence, greed, racism, and homophobia.

Almond, who contributes to The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and The Los Angeles Times, sits down with longtime Kansas City TV sports anchor (and former Villanova University football standout) Frank Boal for a conversation about Almond’s unflinching book about America’s most popular sport.


Wednesday, January 21, 2015
9:30am @ Waldo Branch

We provide stories and activities for children 12-24 months of age.


Wednesday, January 21, 2015
10:30am @ Waldo Branch

Children ages 2-5 will enjoy stories, songs, and crafts.


Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Kansas Citians go to the polls in April and June to elect a mayor and 12 city council members who will direct the city for the next four years. What are the talking points? The priorities?

Launching a second season of Citizens Project forums co-sponsored by the nonpartisan Citizens Association of Kansas City, a panel of local media representatives including KCUR’s Steve Kraske and The Kansas City Star’s Lynn Horsley identifies and explores the issues the candidates ought to address.

Subsequent discussions in the series — on the third Wednesday in February and March — will feature the perspectives of city administrators and politicos.


Thursday, January 22, 2015

Behind Batman stood Alfred. Behind James Bond stood Q. And behind some of the most influential figures of the past century, from presidents to diplomats to Supreme Court justices, stood Grenville Clark.

The New York-born lawyer, activist, and advisor championed academic freedom, fought a successful public battle with good friend Franklin Roosevelt over FDR’s attempt to “pack” the Supreme Court, and worked closely with the NAACP to uphold civil rights during the tumultuous 1950s and ’60s. He devoted his last decades to a quest for world peace through limited but enforceable world law.

Writer Nancy Peterson Hill, administrator of the Diastole Scholars’ Center affiliated with UMKC, discusses her new book on this largely anonymous, but immensely important, American.


Friday, January 23, 2015

Stories, songs, crafts and more!!


Friday, January 23, 2015

Coterie Theatre actors fold words of inspiration from the late poet, author, and songwriter Shel Silverstein, Charlotte’s Web heroes Charlotte and Wilbur, and a host of others — statesmen, explorers, teachers, scientists, inventors, and even kids themselves — into this rousing and enlightening production.

Recommended for children in grades 1-5.


Saturday, January 24, 2015
(All day) @ Central Library

Richard Berkley spent considerable time on both sides of the camera lens – as the longest-serving mayor in Kansas City’s history and as a prolific amateur photographer who never met a U.S. president, sports star, movie personality, or average Joe he couldn’t capture in color or black and white.


Saturday, January 24, 2015

This class on the fundamentals of Microsoft Word focuses on templates as well as the various menu options.


Saturday, January 24, 2015

The Library’s Winter Reading Program, this year featuring a theme of Love on the Rocks, begins January 20, 2015, and continues through March 20, 2015. Pick up your Winter Reading booklet at your favorite Library location and be sure to check out these films about love gone wrong. This month’s focus: Boy Loses Girl.

In the Stanley H. Durwood Film Vault, Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.