This Week in Kansas City History

All Library locations will be closed on Monday, September 7th for Labor Day.

The Worst Fire in Kansas City History

Postcard of the Coates House Hotel

January 28, 1978: Flames engulf the Coates House Hotel, destroying much of the building and causing the worst loss of life by fire in Kansas City history.


The Annexation That Wasn’t

Robert T. Van Horn

January 21, 1879: The Kansas Senate approves a proposal to move the state border eastward in order to annex Kansas City, a plan that is blocked by the Missouri legislature.


Death of a Legend

Arthur Bryant

December 28, 1982: Arthur Bryant, who established one of the most famous barbeque restaurants in the world, dies of a heart attack at the age of 80.


Striking a Chord

Foundry near Leeds, MO. Photo credit Tom Davidson, Jr.

December 16, 1936: One thousand members of the United Auto Workers conduct a sit-down strike at the Fisher Body plant in Kansas City, giving early momentum to what will become known as the General Motors Strike of 1936-1937.


Flying High

B-25 bombers lined up at North American Aviation, Incorporated, almost ready for their first test flight, Kansas City, Kansas. Photo credit Alfred T. Palmer

December 7, 1940: The Army Air Corps announces that a bomber plant, which will employ 26,000 and produce most of the B-25 medium bombers used in World War II, will be built in the Fairfax district of Kansas City, Kansas.


Kansas City Public Library Beta