This Week in Kansas City History

All Library locations will be closed on Sunday, April 20, in observance of the Easter holiday.

His Own Man

Harry S.  Truman

February 2, 1940: Despite the downfall of the Pendergast political machine, Senator Harry S. Truman decides to run for the Senate again in Missouri while at a meeting in the Hotel President in Kansas City.


The Wight Stuff

Nelson Art Gallery Exterior

January 22, 1882: William D. Wight, who, along with his brother Thomas, will create the architecture firm of Wight & Wight that will leave a neoclassical look on such famous Kansas City landmarks as the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Jackson County Courthouse, and City Hall, is born in Halifax, Nova Scotia.


Plane Speaking

Kansas City International Airport

November 21, 1972: Built at a cost of $250 million, Kansas City International Airport opens, featuring an innovative "Drive to Your Gate" design.


The Show Must Go On

George Warder, a lawyer and real estate investor who moved to Kansas City in 1878

October 26, 1887: The unfinished Warder Grand Theater opens with a production of Othello starring Edwin Booth; the determined audience sits in borrowed chairs without a roof or heat.


Gettysburg of the West

General Sterling Price

October 23, 1864: Confederate and Union forces battle in Westport, on the grounds of the present-day Country Club Plaza, resulting in a Union Army victory when the Confederate forces flee south.