This Week in Kansas City History

All Library locations will be closed on Sunday, April 20, in observance of the Easter holiday.

Ringing in the New

Construction view of Convention Hall, 1900

December 31, 1900: Fifteen thousand of Kansas City's elite brave the cold to usher in the new century at Convention Hall. The revelers were in an optimistic, even jubilant mood. In just 50 years, the region that is now greater Kansas City had grown from a few small towns into a thriving metropolitan area of 268,000.


Death of a Legend

Arthur Bryant

December 28, 1982: Arthur Bryant, who established one of the most famous barbeque restaurants in the world, dies of a heart attack at the age of 80.


Striking a Chord

Foundry near Leeds, MO. Photo credit Tom Davidson, Jr.

December 16, 1936: One thousand members of the United Auto Workers conduct a sit-down strike at the Fisher Body plant in Kansas City, giving early momentum to what will become known as the General Motors Strike of 1936-1937.


Forgotten, But Not Gone

Nelle Nichols Peters, Architect. Photo credit Jackson County (Mo.) Historical Society Archives

December 11, 1884: Nelle Nichols Peters, whose architectural skills will leave their mark on nearly 1,000 Kansas City apartment buildings and residences, is born in Niagara, North Dakota.


Flying High

B-25 bombers lined up at North American Aviation, Incorporated, almost ready for their first test flight, Kansas City, Kansas. Photo credit Alfred T. Palmer

December 7, 1940: The Army Air Corps announces that a bomber plant, which will employ 26,000 and produce most of the B-25 medium bombers used in World War II, will be built in the Fairfax district of Kansas City, Kansas.