Recommended Reading

Discover books with Novelist Plus K-8

New Books

Browse newly acquired children's books at the library:

Award Winners

Lists of local award winning books for children »

Books We Recommend by Grade

Tumble Book Library

Read narrated children's books online, complete with sound and moving images. TumbleBooks features an optimized site for mobile and tablet users.

Get started with Tumble Book Library now > (Library card required from home)

Reviews

Does chilly weather make you want to sip hot apple cider with cinnamon in it? You aren’t alone. Fall brings with it delicious comfort foods—including pumpkins. Halloween is over, but Jack-o-lanterns are just one way to celebrate with pumpkins. Thanksgiving feasts traditionally feature pumpkin pies for desserts. According to Pumpkins by Anne L. Burckhardt, “Cookies, bread, and soup can be made from pumpkins. The seeds can be toasted for a snack.” So, there are a multitude of fall treats that we can create from this orange gourd. What if you have no idea what to make or how to make it?

All through this HOT summer, we’ve been talking about the cool things happening in our gardens: the plants we’ve grown (or tried to grow!), the creepy crawly pests that have invaded our plots, the tasty treats we can make from the produce of our hard work. We’ve learned a lot about growing our own food, but what about the rest of the things that we eat?

What about the bread that holds our tasty tomato sandwiches? What about scrambled eggs with cheese? WHAT ABOUT CHOCOLATE BARS?! I’m as hungry for information about where my food comes from as I am the food itself, and I’m sure that you have wondered about it, too. This month, I’m going to tell you about some great books that help answer the question: How did my food get to be, well, FOOD?


Market Day by Lois Ehlert is a great book to read with little kids who want to know more about the trip that their food takes from the farm to the farmers’ market. Bright colors illustrate the simple story of the journey taken by some carrots and tomatoes from the dark country fields where they grow to the lively market and then to the kitchen of a hungry family. New readers will need some help with some of the unfamiliar words, but the beautiful folk art pictures will give context clues when the story gets confusing.

Many (if not most) children will be headed back to school in the next couple of weeks. To help kick off the school season, check out these light-hearted books that will entertain even the most reluctant reader.

How Do Dinosaurs Go to School?
By Jane Yolen

Pages