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Reviews

by Amy Morris

With spring and the Easter Bunny season upon us, here is a list of books about rabbits that are sure to hop off your childrens’ bookshelves time and time again:

It’s Not Easy Being a Bunny by Marilyn Sadler. In this P.J. Funny Bunny tale, P.J. moves in with many other animals, but learns he is not meant to be anything other than the adorable little rabbit that he is. This is a great book for a beginning reader and full of giggles.

Duck! Rabbit! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal. This modern little classic, designed around simple but amusing illustrations, poses one question – is it a duck or is it a rabbit. By the end of the book, you’re still not sure, but you’ve had so much fun, you don’t care. Story time children adore this one!

The Story of the Easter Bunny by Katherine Tegen. If you’re looking to slip a quick Easter Bunny story into your preschool reading time, this is one to consider. It has a slight fairy tale/fantasy feel and makes kids seriously wonder how the Easter Bunny got started in the chocolate egg business.

By Kristan Whipple

Books have always played an important part in my life. At a very early age, I learned that another world existed within the pages and I would immerse myself in as many books as I could find. By the age of ten, I had already solved countless cases with the Hardy Boys, lived my life as a pioneer with the Ingalls family, and found a key that led to a locked garden.

Herschel Wyatt obit photo

Each month, John Horner digs into the Missouri Valley Special Collections to unearth a story from local history and look at it in new light. This month, John looks at how an officer killed in the line of duty in 1923 is remembered in today's Kansas City Police Mounted Patrol Unit.

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