Canadian Consul General Roy Norton Looks Back at an Especially Good Neighbor, Harry S. Truman

Approaching the 70th anniversary of the start of Harry S. Truman’s presidency, Roy Norton – the Canadian consul general to Illinois, Missouri, and Wisconsin – discusses Truman’s appreciation for our neighbor to the north and the consequent political and economic advances on both  sides of the border.
Thursday, February 26, 2015
Program: 
6:30 pm
RSVP Required

Harry S. Truman’s relationship with Canada has received limited attention from historians. But the 33rd president’s appreciation for our “good neighbor to the north” resulted in significant political and economic advances on both sides of the border while fostering an alliance that underpinned America’s global engagement.

Approaching the 70th anniversary of Truman’s move into the White House in April 1945, Roy Norton — the new Canadian consul general to Illinois, Missouri, and Wisconsin — discusses key elements from the period 1945-53 that saw Canada attain its ongoing status as America’s best customer and closest ally.

Appointed less than a year ago, Norton oversees trade and other relations between Canada and his three assigned states from his home base of Chicago.

This event, co-presented by the Truman Library Institute and co-sponsored by the International Relations Council, is made possible by generous grants from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.

Wed, 02/18/2015
Steven Woolfolk
Canadian Consul General Roy Norton Looks Back<br> At an Especially Good Neighbor, Harry S. Truman

(Kansas City, Missouri) - Harry S. Truman's relationship with Canada has received limited attention from historians. But the 33rd president's appreciation for our "good neighbor to the north" resulted in significant political and economic advances on both sides of the border while fostering an alliance that underpinned America's global engagement.

Approaching the 70th anniversary of Truman's move into the White House in April 1945, Roy Norton — the new Canadian consul general to Missouri, Illinois, and Wisconsin — discusses what would become a fruitful period in the two countries' shared history on Thursday, February 26, 2015, at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

His presentation, Truman, Canada, and the Birth of the Postwar World, begins at 6:30 p.m.

Truman's kinship with Canada was evidenced, in part, by his insistence that the U.S. end years of foot-dragging and partner in the construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway, opening traffic from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. The two neighbors' history of friendship and cooperation, the President said, had been "a remarkable example of the way in which free countries should conduct their joint affairs."

Norton examines other key elements from the period 1945-53 that saw Canada attain its ongoing status as America's best customer and one of its closest allies.

Appointed less than a year ago, Norton oversees trade and other relations between Canada and Missouri, Illinois, and Wisconsin from his home base of Chicago. He previously served as his country's consul general to Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio, and before that was minister of congressional, public, and intergovernmental relations at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C. In the latter role, he was responsible for the Canadian government's relations with the U.S. Congress.

This event, co-presented by the Truman Library Institute and co-sponsored by the International Relations Council, is made possible by generous grants from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.

A 6 p.m. reception precedes the event. Admission is free. RSVP at kclibrary.org or call 816.701.3407.

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